Welcome to Tactical Gamer

  • Not as Smart as We Think We Are

    Marshall McLuhan, a Canadian media scholar, put media studies in the daily news and at the forefront of the social sciences in the last century when he drew a convincing connection between content, medium, brain, and society. McLuhan's insights were correct, although his theories about the nature of the connection were often fanciful and quickly disproven.

    Over sixty years after McLuhan's initial connection between mind and medium we are still trying to assess the nature of media's effects upon us. A team of researchers at the University of Rochester just published a study about the impact of gaming upon an aspect of decision making known as "probabilistic inference", and for the Tactical Gaming community, the news appears to be all good.

    Yet when it comes to our media habits, effects are seldom indisputable and they are usually contradictory. Media use gives and takes away. So we need to be a cautious before we jump to the conclusion that gaming has positive real-world consequences.

    You have probably already heard about the latest research published in Current Biology. It was covered by The Economist and most English-speaking newspapers around the world. The researchers' conclusion is unequivocal:

    "Action video game experience results in more efficient use of sensory evidence. Importantly, these improvements are not restricted to the visual modality, but appear in the auditory modality as well. Moreover, 50 hr of action video game training led to qualitatively similar results in a group of NVGPs [Non Video-Game Players], establishing a causative relationship between action video game experience and improved probabilistic inference."

    All this means that video game playing results in a more efficient use of auditory and visual evidence leading to faster and better decision making. Up until now, research into video game effects has only demonstrated that playing video games makes you better at playing video games. Not quite the industrial application that businesses and the military are looking for here. Yet the research paper, imposingly titled, "Improved Probabilistic Inference as a General Learning Mechanism with Action Video Games" concludes that

    "improvements after action game training are not limited to playing the game itself, but generalize to new tasks. Gamers, we propose, acquire the ability to dynamically retune the connectivity between the momentary evidence layer and the layer integrating the evidence based on the statistics of the very task they are performing."

    The new skills we learn while playing video games are transferable to other activities. The Economist suggests that the implications of this research will be found in improved reaction times within the population (after all, 67% of American households include at least one video-gamer). Furthermore, "if video-gamers are really better equipped to make quick decisions, they might also turn out to be better drivers and end up in fewer accidents."

    Forty thousand people died on America`s highways last year. I bet that over the past thirty years of growth in video-gaming, the death rate on America`s highways has seen no significant decrease.

    Video-gaming may make for faster decisions, but speed was at the very heart of the problem of the housing crisis and the stock market -- very smart people very quickly making very foolish decisions.

    Increased speed and efficiency in decision making does not and will not lead to wiser decisions. We have had over twenty years of "improved" networked collective intelligence, yet our major problems remain unsolved and are growing in consequence and severity.

    Gaming will not make us smarter, anymore than the Internet will make us wiser. There is more at work when we make decisions than just speed.

    Being fast at fragging is not an item for your resume. At least, not until further research . . .

    Dr. Strangelove (a.k.a. [TG] E-Male)
    Author of The Empire of Mind: Digital Piracy and the Anti-capitalist Movement, and
    Watching YouTube: Extraordinary Videos by Ordinary People, (University of Toronto Press).
     

     
    Comments 9 Comments
    1. Warlab's Avatar
      Warlab -
      The action gamers were up to 25% faster at coming to a conclusion and they answered just as many questions correctly. - The Economist

      Maybe not any more wiser decisions, but not any less correct.
      I'd not mind seeing that on a resume.
    1. E-Male's Avatar
      E-Male -
      Quote Originally Posted by warlab View Post
      The action gamers were up to 25% faster at coming to a conclusion and they answered just as many questions correctly. - The Economist

      Maybe not any more wiser decisions, but not any less correct.
      I'd not mind seeing that on a resume.
      Yet there is, as yet, no research that demonstrates that as a group, gamers are better employees.

      From what I know of 70 years of research into media effects -- don't hold your breath. It is highly unlikely that gaming makes us better at decision-making in life, or smarter, than the average population.
    1. MacLeod's Avatar
      MacLeod -
      I would like to see a study like this done on RTS gamers, the majority of RTS games require a ton a skill, concentration, and the ability to multitask.
    1. MacLeod's Avatar
      MacLeod -
      Quote Originally Posted by TheSkudDestroyer View Post
      Interesting course but its too bad that they had to preform it on SC, unless your playing in the iCCup league or something of similar level, the game does not require as much tactics and actual think then say the Total War series. SC mostly (note: not always) tests your memorization skills and ability to follow a set pattern, unlike open battles in RTW which require constant on the go thinking and elaborate strategies.
    1. E-Male's Avatar
      E-Male -
      In the past, the gamming community was thought be be highly segmented. We now know that the market is segment more by game theme than by game type, so the issue of differences between RTF vs FPS players is probably a non-starter -- they are, for the most part, the same group.

      See here for some 2009 demographic stats.
    1. Grunt 70's Avatar
      Grunt 70 -
      1000 Points off the bat for not saying the m _ _ _ _ _ is the m_ _ _ _ _ _ .

      At any rate I'm enjoying your observations about how gaming influences culture and vice versa.
    1. Warlab's Avatar
      Warlab -
      Quote Originally Posted by E-Male View Post
      Yet there is, as yet, no research that demonstrates that as a group, gamers are better employees.

      From what I know of 70 years of research into media effects -- don't hold your breath. It is highly unlikely that gaming makes us better at decision-making in life, or smarter, than the average population.
      Given that the study showed that gamers made decisions just a correctly as non-gamers, I'd say faster decision making is a personal asset. One that makes their decision making process better.
    1. Jackspyder's Avatar
      Jackspyder -
      another interesting read there E-Mail. also is it strange i watch your lectures on YT even though im half way round the world studying a different course?
  • Connect

  • TeamSpeak 3 Server Info

  • Advertisement

  • Planetside 2 Outfit

  • Calendar

    October   2014
    Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
    1 2 3 4
    5 6 7 8 9 10 11
    12 13 14 15 16 17 18
    19 20 21 22 23 24 25
    26 27 28 29 30 31

Back to top