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More Journalistic Drivel on the Sociology of Gaming

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From Forbes, one of the worst magazines in print, comes this bit of nonsense:

Having this experience in a shared space, where the other players were a constant and palpable off-screen presence was, to me, an ideal form of pure social waste, the pleasure of play derived from the befouling of social bonds in a space where the reduction of other people into digital obstacles was self-evidently petty and artificial. The flourishing of ways to get the toxic nectar of digital play in a format that deprives us of the tempering awareness of others is an epochal coping mechanism, an industry supplying self-medicators in a time of overwhelming pacification, in which subconscious yearning for meaningful forms of physical action and communal purpose have been checkmated in advance by political and legal structures that have grown both more uncontestable and more frighteningly severe. In earlier generations play was sold as a discrete product, in part, because the psychological need it served was self-conscious of its limits. As the industry has shifted toward online play of singular games that have near infinite variation, necessitating 100 hours of play just to reach basic competence, we are indulging a newer and more pathetic emotional need to dissociate from an experience of digitized modernity that has produced as much precarity and punishment as it has progress and communal bonding.

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Comments

  1. JHemp81's Avatar
    Im thinking the author really sucks at online gaming, and is railing against it in retaliation. The needless, almost Lovecraftian vocab usage speaks to a need of the author to feel like a "better person" than the unwashed masses who enjoy community gaming. The End.
  2. BeSiege82's Avatar
    @E-Male

    I can't help but think of works by Sherry Turkle and dana boyd. Not that reading their works will change minds.
  3. Ytman's Avatar
    I actually agree with the article to an extent. Most entertainment is a form of escapism and I can definitely say that I'm more than a little disillusioned in my peers when it comes to political and social involvement. A very many people are apathetic or uninterested in the 'greater picture'.

    There is even a hypothesis as to why we've never encountered any evidence of an advanced space fairing civilization that suggests that at some point an advanced society is more focused on pleasure and entertainment than the struggles of exploration and science.
  4. Grunt 70's Avatar
    The guy writes like an ass....eg.: The flourishing of ways to get the toxic nectar of digital play in a format that deprives us of the tempering awareness of others is an epochal coping mechanism, an industry supplying self-medicators in a time of overwhelming pacification, in which subconscious yearning for meaningful forms of physical action and communal purpose have been checkmated in advance by political and legal structures that have grown both more uncontestable and more frighteningly severe.

    Wasn't it just the other day we talked about how difficult it was to read works written by academia? This is not but is it trying to be? By the 3rd or 4th paragraph I didn't really care what he had to say. Regardless of his thesis it really is drivel...you hit the nail on the head. He says in five sentences what can be said in one.
  5. Kronos's Avatar
    I’ve never liked playing games against other people, and the introduction of the Internet as an intermediary in play seems like the saddest of all possible arrangements. I started in videogames working in the multiplayer testing division for a major publisher, ...
    Seems like two problems right there, doing work that you admittedly don't like and working for a major publisher, who are notorious for disregarding people as replaceable units. IMO it seems reasonable that maybe some of that disassociation and dislike the author feels may be from other sources than the games themselves just in this tiny biographical peek.

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