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Acreo Aeneas

New Graphics Card: Part 1

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So I'm still using a rapidly aging GTX 670 (2 GB) and had been waiting for AMD's Fury lineup of dGPUs. Well they are out, the top two cards are where I expected them to be price-wise. The Nano was the one that interested me for it's form factor and performance ability potential. The performance is there. I'd say within striking distance of the 980Ti, but not at the current price point of $650. I was rather hoping some of the rumormill of it being a $400 card was accurate. Guess not. I'll have to wait for it to drop in price by at least $200 before considering it. I just don't have a $650 graphics card budget. $400 would have been a absolute limit. Now I can't even afford that since I've seen spent the money on bills. The GTX970 Mini, however, was disappointing in comparison. Meh.

You're probably asking why I'm considering such a small card when I have a full tower? Simple, I plan on building a new smaller rig next year. This time, it's very likely I'll be doing a AMD rig. I've had Intel rigs for the past 3-4 cycles. Think I'm just tired of looking at grim upgrade potentials years down the road. If I want the latest Intel CPU, I'd have to get rid of my current motherboard as well. That means I'd have to get a new copy of Windows 10 as well. That's easily another $200 down the drain. It's a non-starter for me. I'm still of the mindset that I should be able to get the latest CPU for my respective platform 2-3 years down the road before I have to upgrade the motherboard. Sadly I can't just pop out my 3770K for a 6700K. It's been 3 years since I upgraded from a E8400 to the 3770K (which also required me buying a new board). We've gone through 3 successive "generations" of chips since, hence the starting "6xxx" vs. my current "3xxx". On the flipside, it doesn't look like AMD users can get the latest and greatest and just it in next year when the new Zen chips out. Then again, they were due for a socket change at their yesteryear's standard (assuming Intel's yearly tick-tock cadence is the new/current norm).

Let's see what SFF dGPUs are out these coming months before the release of the Zen CPUs.

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  1. ScratchnSniff0's Avatar
    [mywhine]
    I really REALLY hate having to upgrade more than one piece at a time on my computer. Actually, let me rephrase that; I love upgrading a computers parts, but I hate having to pay so much for them. Having to buy a new motherboard every time I get a new CPU is outrageous, and the expense becomes almost un-affordable when the memory/psu/etc has to be upgraded. As fast as technology is upgrading, this becomes unsustainable to the broke-but-still-enthusiast gamers.

    I am not saying we should never move forward with technology; what I think a can say is that if there were more competitors to the AMD/Intel/nVidia monster machines, we might have at least somewhat cheaper prices so that we don't have to break the bank to upgrade a part or two. One of the perks of owning a computer over a console, in my humble opinion, is/should be the ability to upgrade a part at a time so that one can keep somewhat of a pace with current technology, without having to buy a whole new system. I think it would be amazing if they just had one socket even every 5 years instead of every 1-2, it would make things much easier for the consumer.
    [/mywhine]
  2. YerMom's Avatar
    The most important question in any hardware statement today is this:

    Do you game in 4k or just in HD?

    If you game in 4k, then you should care about what graphics card you have.
    If you game in just HD, that 670 is probably good for the next generation games (Battlefront, Fallout 4, etc) but may not run the games on ultra.

    I'm running a gtx 650 Ti Boost TF3 with 2 gigs and an i5-3570k and I run every game on the market up to Battlefield 4 on Ultra. Anything beyond that is iffy. I've preordered Battlefront. I highly doubt I'll run it at 1080p on Ultra, but maybe.

    That said, I absolutely cannot run any of those games at 4k on ultra. I don't have the hardware for it anyway, so it's not a big deal to me yet.

    I KEEP seeing people say "I need this 960. I need this new CPU. I need this new mobo." I built my PC a year ago to last me years. The i5-3570k is easily OC capable up to like 5ghz with water cooling. I have two slots so I can SLI cards and PLENTY of room for advancement there. I have enough RAM slots for 32 gigs of RAM. This PC will last me years and years by only upgraded my GPU and RAM occasionally. Right now, if I got a new 960, I could probably run everything on 4k on ultra, no big deal.

    Maybe it's just me, but I don't see why people NEED these new things. Again, if they're doing 4k, then sure, whatever. But, if all these guys are just playing HD, there's really no need for a 960 with a brand new i7 and 18 gigs of RAM. In fact, there's no need for over 8 gigs of RAM at all on any machine that isn't doing major video editting or graphical animation or anything of the sort. Us gamers, even the most hardcore of us, will likely never use over 8 gigs of RAM.

    Mom
  3. YerMom's Avatar
    I like to use this as a perspective enhancement device:

    I was recently paying for 105mbps internet. My download speed was 8MB/s max.

    I've now downgraded to 50mbps internet. To those that are troubled mathematically, that's HALF the speed.

    I now download at 6.4MB/s max.

    Was it really worth paying the difference? Hardware is largely the same. You can buy that 960 all day long, but there's a very damn good chance that it will be bottlenecked on just about any processor on the market that we can afford. As I said above, we don't need more than 8 gigs of RAM ever unless you're doing epic stuff well beyond gaming. And, while a lot of games are going more towards CPU than GPU these days, older CPUs are still powerhouses if you use them correctly.

    Mom

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