Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Maj. Dick Winters. RIP

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Maj. Dick Winters. RIP

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/nati...others_is.html

    o7
    Do or do not, there is no try....
    -- Yoda, Dagobah

  • #2
    Re: Maj. Dick Winters. RIP

    He will be missed but not forgotten anytime soon, RIP.
    Randy = Ace ! - Warlab
    Level II Volunteer FireFighter
    Level I HazMat Technician
    NYS EMT-B
    Town of Mamaroneck Fire Dept.

    sigpic




    Bring On Project Reality 1.0!!!
    RSS Feeds:Bamboo | | 9/11 - Never Forget |
    Apophis - "TG was created to cater to a VERY specific type of gamer rather than trying to appeal to the greater gaming population.
    Tactical Gamer is not mainstream.
    We are not trying to attract mainstream gamers."

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Maj. Dick Winters. RIP

      He was an inspiration. A humble man rising up to the greatest of challenges. He and the men of Easy Company are but a microcosm of the heroism of our grandfathers - may they all rest in peace with the thanks of a grateful world.
      I got yer Dancing With the F**&ing Stars right here!!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Maj. Dick Winters. RIP

        I'm glad Ambrose wrote the book and HBO did the movie on the Band of Brothers. Otherwise, a lot more people would have no idea who he is or what he did. We need more stories like his to be told. Thanks for the heads up gunjunkie.
        sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Maj. Dick Winters. RIP

          Read this in the headlines today. I think I actually almost started crying. Great man. If I can, I will be attending his funeral.

          [unit][squadl][command2]

          KnyghtMare ~You could always tell the person holding the gun to your head you would like to play on a different server...

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Maj. Dick Winters. RIP

            They were al great men. And not just united states.
            sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Maj. Dick Winters. RIP

              I saw that in the paper. Sad to hear of his passing, but his memory will last for years to come...



              Interested in listening to guitar playing and a good conversation, look for me on TS.

              "Hope is for the weak. I hope for nothing. I work for things. That is the only way for events to unfold." -Cleverbot

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Maj. Dick Winters. RIP

                A hero by any other name. May he rest in peace.
                |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
                TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
                Former 9th & 13th

                Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
                Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





                SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

                TG Primer and Rules

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Maj. Dick Winters. RIP

                  Originally posted by Dredge View Post
                  Read this in the headlines today. I think I actually almost started crying. Great man. If I can, I will be attending his funeral.
                  You can't. He didn't want a fuss, so he requested that the news not be released till after he was buried. Which, from everything I've read and heard about him, fits. He was humble to a fault, and he told people he was no hero. Which was of course not true. Millions of men served in that war, and most of them did their jobs, and many of them fought bravely. Few were heroes, and Winters, and the rest of Easy, and the 506th and the 101st and the rest of the Airborne in particular stand out.

                  People with fierce egalitarian sensibilities protest there is no such thing as an elite unit. General Shinseki notably issued berets to every single American soldier (the Rangers switched from black to tan berets) arguing that every American soldier was elite. This notion was, and is, total bull****. When Hitler threw the dice for the last time, and the SS entered the Ardennes for the last battle, the draftee units on the line broke. They were infantry sure, and green, and the SS were a lot of things, but in 1944 they weren't green or lightly equipped. The fact is, the Infantry broke. So as the draftees broke and ran, the Airborne rode in trucks to the sound of the guns. They spent Christmas in a little town in Belgium called Bastogne. They huddled in freezing holes, with scant rations and poor clothing and low ammo. Richard Winters ate 5 cold white beans for Christmas dinner in 1944. Meanwhile the ones who had run were being reorganized, with hot food and gas powered heaters and plenty of tanks. Patton broke through to Bastogne on December 26th, allowing supplies and medevac for the 101st.

                  Voltaire once observed that a rational army would run away. The soldier must be rational, professional. The warrior is not always rational. Horatius, Leonidas, Chamberlain, Devereux, Winters, Puller, Chontosh, men like them are not rational. Heroism is irrational, and those who venerate reason over courage can't ever really understand men like them. It doesn't make any sense to volunteer to be dropped behind enemy lines. What if Ike's weathermen were wrong? What if the break in the weather they predicted had not emerged? What if the 101st, and the 82nd, and British 6th Airborne had dropped into occupied France and not been relieved by the infantry and armor coming across the beaches? Well, they would have been butchered, and the survivors thrown into the stalag. So why did they do it? Their answers range from the mercenary (double pay) to calculating (better to fight alongside volunteers then draftees). It doesn't really hold up though. Only a third of the men involved in the US military would hear shots fired in anger. If you could type, or had any experience with electronics or machinery, chances were your billet would involve hot food, showers, and a low likelihood of being killed or wounded. If your goal was to survive, then you'd have a better chance going through a normal pipeline. Winters, and the men he commanded, were not in it to survive. They were in it to make a difference. They were volunteers all, which means something more than being a draftee. They chose to place their fragile bodies between home and war's desolation, dedicating themselves to the defense of the Republic. To accept greater risk for no benefit is irrational, and that's what makes the difference between a soldier and a warrior.

                  Comment

                  Connect

                  Collapse

                  TeamSpeak 3 Server

                  Collapse

                  Advertisement

                  Collapse

                  Twitter Feed

                  Collapse

                  Working...
                  X