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Any Fellow EMT's/Medics? - Questions from a hopeful EMT student

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  • Any Fellow EMT's/Medics? - Questions from a hopeful EMT student

    When it rains it pours gentlemen.

    Found out on the 20th that my job no longer existed, due to the start up I worked for not getting any contracts or VC funds (I blame that on the chief), even though I was planning on taking a New York State EMT class I have officially put in my application for it and hopefully enough people have signed up that it in fact will be offered towards the end of January (two classes a week 4 hours each class until late May).

    For any fellow EMT's/Medics within TG, what can I expect? Though I was successful in passing the New York State Hazmat Basic class, I don't come from a science background and had to study my burro off for it.

    How hard of a class (i know each state is different even though it's very similar) is it, I am looking forward to it to strengthen my resume and my overall curiosity as well as being able to help during MVA's/Extrication calls, as well as the growing number of ALS calls my department goes on with the local Volunteer Ambulance Corps.

    Any insight would be most helpful as well as any insight if anyone of you are paid EMT's.

    Thanks.
    Randy = Ace ! - Warlab
    Level II Volunteer FireFighter
    Level I HazMat Technician
    NYS EMT-B
    Town of Mamaroneck Fire Dept.

    sigpic




    Bring On Project Reality 1.0!!!
    RSS Feeds:Bamboo | | 9/11 - Never Forget |
    Apophis - "TG was created to cater to a VERY specific type of gamer rather than trying to appeal to the greater gaming population.
    Tactical Gamer is not mainstream.
    We are not trying to attract mainstream gamers."


  • #2
    Re: Any Fellow EMT's/Medics? - Questions from a hopeful EMT student

    TurkishDelight is an EMT iirc.
    Skud


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    • #3
      Re: Any Fellow EMT's/Medics? - Questions from a hopeful EMT student

      expect lots and lots of reading Randy, if its anything like the EMT course here you will learn lots of stuff related to pharmaceutical procedures regarding different medication and effects which you'll need to remember. Then stuff like Primary care and Trauma care and all that jazz. The course here is about 396 hours for an EMT not including all the time you spend studying and before you can even go for your EMT you need to be and EMR which is about 140 hours of class room time :)

      So if your only going for 8 hours every week from the end of January till May it sounds more like what we would call an EMR course. Either way good luck if you get in bud!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Any Fellow EMT's/Medics? - Questions from a hopeful EMT student

        Check this thread out. It's from 2010, but has lots of input.
        Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Any Fellow EMT's/Medics? - Questions from a hopeful EMT student

          I have all my books next to me, and I'm more than willing to help you out in any way you need. I was a firefighter for one year, promoted to Captain of a volunteer dept. for a year as well and responded to a healthy number of EMS calls as well. Furthermore, I used the things I learned during my TOD as a FF/EMT in a corrections environment as an LEO for almost 2 years as well.

          Originally posted by Delta
          For any fellow EMT's/Medics within TG, what can I expect? Though I was successful in passing the New York State Hazmat Basic class, I don't come from a science background and had to study my burro off for it.
          Depends what you're asking. What can you expect from the class? A lot of "Do it this way because do it this way and if you don't do it this way, you have failed." It doesn't matter if your way makes sense, or if it would be faster. Get used to doing it the way the instructor tells you, and get used to instructors disagreeing. In the case of instructors disagreeing, go with your class curriculum and/or the book and you'll come out on the winning end every time.

          Get used to memorization. You'll be using loads of mnemonics and abbreviations and all sorts of other things -- be ready to rattle them off the top of your head on a dime. Know exactly what the Glasgow Coma Scale is and how to rate different patients. That's a big one that a lot of my FFs couldn't get their head around without a cheat sheet (which is fine, but know how to do it without a cheat sheet). Talk through everything you do, and be confident. My instructors had to pull me aside during my class and tell me that my level of knowledge and confidence, they felt, was offputting other students from learning at their pace. That's fine. I toned it down after that. But you know something? When I took that to the streets, I had nothing but job offers and compliments from people that weren't even there and only heard about how I carried myself through the grapevine. You can mess up, and you will, but be confident in your knowledge and humble yourself to your ignorance.
          Don't be afraid to ask questions. But, again, most importantly talk through everything you do and treat the class and training as if it were real. You might feel like you look like a jackass to other students, but if they get into the field -- and most generally don't -- then they're going to wish they had taken it more seriously. That's a promise.

          Seriously though. I can't say it enough. Talk, talk, talk. Ask your instructors for more information to get as realistic a view of things as you can.
          Instructor: You respond to a 911 call about a fall, 20 year old female has fallen from a tree and is complaining of back and neck pain.
          You: Medic 1 to dispatch responding to a fall call, 20 year old female. Any further information?
          Instructor: Patient is in and out of consciousness, caller reports she is sweating profusely and speaking incoherently.

          Tell your instructor what is going through your mind, "I'll immediately assess the scene for safety. Do I determine the scene is safe?"
          "Yes, there are no obvious threats."
          "I put on my PPE and observe my patient. How is my patient presenting?"
          "You observe your patient's skin is wet and red, breathing is laboured."
          "I greet the patient [then actually greet your fictional patient] and introduce myself as an EMT and ask if they need help, immediately take C-Spine precautions observing the patient's breathing. Is the patient's breathing still laboured, and do I hear any stridor or snoring?"
          "Breaths are laboured and slow. No stridor or snoring."

          Do you get what I'm saying? Talk with your instructor, get a really good mental picture of what is really going on, and really take it seriously. The same with firearms training, you end up playing like you practise when it comes down to it and if you practise like an idiot that doesn't take it seriously, when you get into the time the fit hits the shan, you're going to panic. As we say in firearms instruction, "You only perform at the highest level you have mastered." Master your basics. Many of my fellow officers in the CF didn't take self-defence seriously, nor did they take the UOF continuum seriously, so when the inmates would get into a fight they would often yell meaningless orders like, "Stop fighting" and have no real intent to back it up. Again, master your basics.

          Originally posted by Delta
          How hard of a class (i know each state is different even though it's very similar) is it, I am looking forward to it to strengthen my resume and my overall curiosity as well as being able to help during MVA's/Extrication calls, as well as the growing number of ALS calls my department goes on with the local Volunteer Ambulance Corps.
          The best thing an EMT can do during an MVC -- there is no such thing as an "accident" as that precludes the possibility of guilt just like there is no accidental discharge only negligent discharges ;) -- is get behind the patient and assume C-spine precautions and talk the patient through their situation. It'll be a lot of talking and monitoring. You'll be getting a really in-depth patient history as quickly as you can in case that patient goes unconscious and can't pass it on. Let the FFs do their work and talk the patient through exactly what they're doing. "Okay, I'm going to lay this sheet over your shoulder and head allright? These firefighters are going to break some glass, so don't get worried, okay? You're almost out."

          And never get complacent with MVCs. Your patient can go from Code Green to Code Red in the literal blink of an eye. Treat it seriously, and be ready to rapidly extricate if your situation changes. Get an idea of what shape the patient is in from the get-go. Don't be afraid of "hurting your patient" because you can't keep perfect C-Spine when extricating rapidly because the car just caught fire. Either they were going to burn alive, or you were going to rapidly extricate.

          Besides, you're only going to do a "full extrication" (i.e. the hydraulic spreaders etc.) if you...
          a.) have a patient in mostly-stable condition and not requiring any ALS care
          b.) have a patient that is trapped and cannot be extricated in any other way

          Lastly, Delta -- and feel free to ask me plenty more, I love talking about my favourite line of work -- document everything. And I mean everything. Learn how to write objectively. The best advice I was ever given was "paint me a picture". I asked what that person meant, and he said, "I wasn't there, and I want to know exactly what happened as if I were."

          Write objectively, be as detailed as you can be. I used to write some pretty awesome narratives that I'd be happy to dig up if you're wanting some examples.

          Do not lie, do not second-guess yourself a hundred times, and leave the calls at the station. You will get eaten alive by the things you're going to see and experience if you take it home with you. I know first-hand. I was beat up for months when I made a mistake that resulted in me losing a patient.

          I responded to a MVC/vehicle fire/structure fire. Driver of the vehicle had come off the road, down a ditch, back up the ditch, through a shed, into the porch of a home. I arrived on scene with a new FF who had a stack of certifications and other "smart guy" documents that could fill a room, but didn't have the sense god gave a fruitfly and also had no real practical experience. I asked the crowd around the vehicle where the driver was, and everyone said he was fine/they didn't know where he was. My first mistake was pulling into the driveway for the easiest attack route...

          Vehicle was fully involved with the fire spreading to the street-facing wall of the home. I went back to my engine/tender, pulled an attack line, snaked it, and instructed my FF (and thank god we had just refreshed his memory on how to run a pump or I would have had to do the whole job myself) to finish pulling the rest of the line from the truck and to turn the pump on but only when I gave the thumbs-up. I donned my SCBA and the rest of my PPE, activated my PASS device, and gave the thumbs up to this dufus. Oh, and did I mention that we responded as a 2-man truck when it should've been 3-4?

          Attack went as planned except the FF charged the line with a kink still in the bay, so I had to go waste more time tugging on the line to unkink it which is hard with hundreds of pounds of water and a powerful pump... Anyway, no signs of remains, fire went out without many issues, and all backup units started showing up. As I'm attacking the fire, a squad unit (usually for MVCs/support/medical calls -- a much smaller vehicle than an engine, larger than a brush truck, and the most 'general response vehicle' most depts. have here) shows up as was standard response. They go around the back of the house - I neglected to do that due to the severity of the fire and the obvious indications the fire had not yet spread - and find the patient with a garden hose over his head with 3rd-degree burns to a majority of his body. They call code red - meaning get the ambulance here yesterday - but because of where I had parked the engine, the ALS unit had to walk a little farther and had a little more difficulty accessing my patient.

          I became complacent and took the word of people that didn't care. It wouldn't have mattered if I parked in the street and assumed patient care, that guy would have probably died anyway. But that call ate me up for months. MONTHS I couldn't get the radio traffic out of my head, and seeing that stretcher come from the back of the house with white sheets draped over it. For months, I got scared I was doing everything wrong and that I wasn't cut out for the work until a Lt. I greatly respect told me that I did everything I could with the knowledge I had.

          And that's what'll end up making you the best EMT/FF/LEO/whatever line of work you decide to go into - doing the best you can, the absolute best - with the knowledge you have at the time. Good luck and if you need any help, let me know. I have plenty of stories I could tell and I'm more than happy to share.

          EDIT1: I know this is long-winded, but one last piece of advice: start viewing the world as a flowchart and start playing the "if then" game as much as you can.

          The if-then game is basically asking yourself, "What if this happens, then what do I do?"
          For example, I'm responding to a possible stroke. That's my starting point. My patient care starts from the moment I receive my call. From the time I get that call to the time I drop the patient off, I'm constantly asking myself questions about if something happens, how should I respond?
          If my load-and-go assessment (red) at patient call is incorrect, do I downgrade to stay and play (green) or do I stay at red? What is my condition for staying red? What if this is an MOI and not an NOI as I initially suspect?
          If patient's vitals are in good shape, but NVA is suspected, then what? What if patient fails their stroke screen? How bad did they fail it? What if they pass? What if this is an OD? What if patient suddenly becomes cool, pale, a diaphoretic? What if the patient starts complaining of nausea? What if the patient loses consciousness? What if the whole area is a crime scene? What if, what if, what if.

          The important thing about the if-then game is to have an answer to everything. Be confident in your answer, know the reason why you want to do it that way. Have a plan in place and maintain a high index of suspicion to modify your internal flowchart as the scene, your patient, and your environment changes. Cool beans? Cool beans.
          Last edited by LordFuzzywig; 01-04-2013, 07:15 AM.

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          • #6
            Re: Any Fellow EMT's/Medics? - Questions from a hopeful EMT student

            well.. tl;dr most of this thread, just gonna skip to my version of "what to expect."

            I took my exams in PA and for the most part, the nation is pretty on par for testing. Just a few protocol differences here and there. My class contained about 40 students. I was top of the class and my partner was the only one that failed the first hands on and also failed the retest. I did all I could for the poor student, but some people just can't (or wont) grasp the concepts. But everyone else? They all passed. Its not really all that hard long as you study and read what your supposed to. I advise against accelerated courses if your considering it. Those are for people whom already have an idea of whats involved.

            If your looking for paramedic, then really prepare to grind your memory recall buttons. Its nearly maddening but you get plenty of time to learn everything and get hands on training here.

            Job wise, there isn't much for EMT-B/I around here unless you have your EVOC, which I don't nor have sponsorship to get it. But medic wise, jobs are pretty plenty and many ERs are hiring paramedic only as assistants.

            Take your time, breathe, when in doubt ALWAYS ask your teacher.
            The soldier formerly known as, Eroak.

            From the TG Primer: 2) Create an environment where there is
            mutual respect for your fellow gamers
            and where all members
            would be working together to advance the enjoyment of their hobby.
            Former TGU Dean, 3rd, 9th, & 56th IHS member.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Any Fellow EMT's/Medics? - Questions from a hopeful EMT student

              Thank you all for your feedback and suggestions, very much appreciated!!

              Class started this past Tuesday and is again this evening, It seems like its going to be very interesting, with a lot of topics to memorize but it also is going to be fun with the skills challenges/scenarios. The instructor is a pretty funny guy besides being well versed, he is a chief/head of a local Towns EMS as well as a Paramedic and obviously State Certified instructor.

              All in all its going to be a good hard time, glad I am taking it with another vol ff from my department but fortunately even though the class is smaller than 32 people they are still having it which I feel is an advantage.

              But thanks for the posts and feedback extremely appreciated!!
              Randy = Ace ! - Warlab
              Level II Volunteer FireFighter
              Level I HazMat Technician
              NYS EMT-B
              Town of Mamaroneck Fire Dept.

              sigpic




              Bring On Project Reality 1.0!!!
              RSS Feeds:Bamboo | | 9/11 - Never Forget |
              Apophis - "TG was created to cater to a VERY specific type of gamer rather than trying to appeal to the greater gaming population.
              Tactical Gamer is not mainstream.
              We are not trying to attract mainstream gamers."

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Any Fellow EMT's/Medics? - Questions from a hopeful EMT student

                Randy, wish you the best of luck and follow LordFuzzywig's advice. Treat every practice as the real thing. Also, one thing I found that helped, outside of class, practice hands on skills to the point they become second nature. Muscle memory helps a lot when your brain is distracted by the scene around you. I'm retired now, but the training came in handy. I did SAR in Rocky Mountain Nat'l Park with Larimer CO SAR and the CAP. Most of my cases were lost hikers dealing with dehydration and hypothermia. Worse case by far was a solo climber who put his belay on wrong and went over the edge. He was the only case where I witnessed CPR revive someone twice.
                sigpic




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                • #9
                  Re: Any Fellow EMT's/Medics? - Questions from a hopeful EMT student

                  Well a few weeks ago I took the New York State Test and well the state test was lets just say interesting. I had to remember that what you answer on the state test is not what you would answer in the field.

                  I did rock the Practical Assessments though, really did well with the Medical Assessment and finally honed my skill on the Trauma assessment. New York State recently changed the 15min time allotted for Trauma to 10minutes. So getting the full trauma assessment down in 10 minutes definitely took a lot. I am glad I did a lot of hours with the Harrison EMS I definitely learned a lot and I was able to see a lot as well.

                  We shall see in a few weeks if I pass, I really hope I do, this was one of the toughest classes I ever took and I have learned a lot and am hoping to apply for jobs upon passing.

                  Anyways just thought I'd give an update and such hope all is well with everyone!!
                  Randy = Ace ! - Warlab
                  Level II Volunteer FireFighter
                  Level I HazMat Technician
                  NYS EMT-B
                  Town of Mamaroneck Fire Dept.

                  sigpic




                  Bring On Project Reality 1.0!!!
                  RSS Feeds:Bamboo | | 9/11 - Never Forget |
                  Apophis - "TG was created to cater to a VERY specific type of gamer rather than trying to appeal to the greater gaming population.
                  Tactical Gamer is not mainstream.
                  We are not trying to attract mainstream gamers."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Any Fellow EMT's/Medics? - Questions from a hopeful EMT student

                    Funny, I got my results after the test was over for the practicals. Written was a no brainier and everyone passed in my class. I'm glad you stuck through it and I hope for the best of outcomes. I'm sure you passed!
                    The soldier formerly known as, Eroak.

                    From the TG Primer: 2) Create an environment where there is
                    mutual respect for your fellow gamers
                    and where all members
                    would be working together to advance the enjoyment of their hobby.
                    Former TGU Dean, 3rd, 9th, & 56th IHS member.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Wanted to let you all know that I did in fact pass!! Wow. What a huge relief and accomplishment I must say for myself!! Now it's off to applying for jobs and actually start to earn a somewhat livable wage etc.
                      thanks to all for the helpful advice etc. there were only two failures in our class and I've kept a good relationship with my instructor in that he said he'd be more than happy to write a recommendation for me and that I may use him as a reference.
                      So far so good.
                      Randy = Ace ! - Warlab
                      Level II Volunteer FireFighter
                      Level I HazMat Technician
                      NYS EMT-B
                      Town of Mamaroneck Fire Dept.

                      sigpic




                      Bring On Project Reality 1.0!!!
                      RSS Feeds:Bamboo | | 9/11 - Never Forget |
                      Apophis - "TG was created to cater to a VERY specific type of gamer rather than trying to appeal to the greater gaming population.
                      Tactical Gamer is not mainstream.
                      We are not trying to attract mainstream gamers."

                      Comment

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