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  • Buying a rifle.

    So I've been thinking about purchasing a rifle for a while now. I'm pretty certain that I'm looking for a .22lr just to get my feet wet. I really haven't shot anything bigger than that and the ammo is dirt cheap.

    I've mainly been looking into Marlin bolt-actions. I'm trying to keep it under 200, and I hear that Marlin's are good quality for the value. I know the Ruger 10/22 is fairly highly regarded (and fairly-highly priced), in fact its the rifle my dad has and the one I have shot. I've just recently heard of Savage, but nothing really substantial enough to base a judgment on. And I heard from my dad that CZ makes them as well (his 9mm is a CZ), but those looked like they were a bit expensive

    I was set to make a purchase on Saturday, but got there 15 minutes before GreenTop closed, and, of course, the only guy I talked to was wearing a Glock polo (although he did recommend the Marlin over the Winchester that was considering). I ended up not buying it, because I didn't have enough documentation. Which ended up being a good thing because now I can ask for an opinion of TG. :)
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  • #2
    Re: Buying a rifle.

    The 22LR rifle I use is a bolt action and has a simple scope on it. I'm no pro but I can put the holes within an inch of the dot so that's good enough for my needs. Likely, you're well-off just getting something used as something new. If you have a proper gunsmith in town, you can probably get something both used and safe for a pittance.

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    • #3
      Re: Buying a rifle.

      I think that for a .22, as long as you go with a name you've heard of, you're going to get a quality rifle.

      You might also consider a Henry lever action if you want a nice rifle that isn't just like all the others...
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      • #4
        Re: Buying a rifle.

        Originally posted by CingularDuality View Post
        I think that for a .22, as long as you go with a name you've heard of, you're going to get a quality rifle.

        You might also consider a Henry lever action if you want a nice rifle that isn't just like all the others...
        Yes, a lever action. Very good suggestion. There is something really cool about a lever action rifle.

        Get that! Get that!

        I, personally, would learn to shoot using the sights before going to a scope. If your shooting ends up taking you to small game hunting (like rabbit or quail) I think you will benefit.
        Iím not racists, I have republican friends. Radio show host.
        - "The essence of tyranny is the denial of complexity". -Jacob Burkhardt
        - "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds" - Emerson
        - "People should not be afraid of it's government, government should be afraid of it's People." - Line from V for Vendetta
        - If software were as unreliable as economic theory, there wouldn't be a plane made of anything other than paper that could get off the ground. Jim Fawcette
        - "Let me now state what seems to me the decisive objection to any conservatism which deserves to be called such. It is that by its very nature it cannot offer an alternative to the direction in which we are moving." -Friedrich Hayek
        - "Don't waist your time on me your already the voice inside my head." Blink 182 to my wife

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        • #5
          Re: Buying a rifle.

          Ooh! That lever action would be fun! I personally am a fan of the Ruger .22 semi-auto rifle. They have a 10-round rotary magazine. Loads of fun to shoot. I'd have a really hard time choosing between that Henry or this.
          http://ruger-firearms.com/Firearms/F...=1103&return=Y

          I've always shot my great-grandfather's old .22 from like 1910. It's a pump action rifle. It's in horrible shape and all rusty looking, but it shoots extremely accurately and the mechanics still work smooth as butter.

          If I was you, I'd check out used rifles. It doesn't matter how old as my 98 year old gun has proven to me. Thankfully, there's no shortage of .22's.
          "Common sense is not so common." -Voltaire

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          • #6
            Re: Buying a rifle.

            I have liked Marlin for their .22's. They seem to be so accurate for a stock gun with out a lot of money tied up into them. I also like the Remington Model 552 Speedmaster pump http://www.remington.com/products/fi...ieldmaster.asp seems like pump .22's are slowly dying out. anyway, the gun does cost a crap load of money cause it is designed just like their centerfire rifles. It can shoot all .22 bullets(shorts, longs, & long rifles). Which this is the magazine capacities, Capacity is 15 (22 Long Rifle); 17 (22 Long); and 20 (22 Short). I have shot this gun before and it seems to also be very accurate(for the price it should be and lined with gold).
            They also have the semi auto version as well that also shoots the different cartidges. I like the fact of being able to shoot different cartridges, shooting the .22 short is not much louder than a BB gun and can kill small rodents with ease at short distance. Important when you don't want the neighbors to know that you are shooting at something.

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            • #7
              Re: Buying a rifle.

              For target shooting, I've always loved peephole sights. How do others here feel about the different kinds of sights available?
              Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

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              • #8
                Re: Buying a rifle.

                Originally posted by ScratchMonkey View Post
                For target shooting, I've always loved peephole sights. How do others here feel about the different kinds of sights available?
                If you're shooting at traditional round bullseye targets, they can't be beat, but for plinking at targets that aren't a black circle, a more open sight is much easier to use...

                And Gringo is right on target with his suggestion to learn how to use iron sights correctly before trying optics. (pun intended) There are some really cool sights on the market now, but if you don't know how to adjust iron sights, you'll never learn how to really shoot...
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                • #9
                  Re: Buying a rifle.

                  Originally posted by ScratchMonkey View Post
                  For target shooting, I've always loved peephole sights. How do others here feel about the different kinds of sights available?
                  Open sights. With a peephole or scope it is easy to develop the habit of closing the eye not looking at the sight. That is a bad habit. Doing this affects your depth perception and limits you field of vision.

                  Even with a scope you should keep your other eye open. You can use it to orient your initial aim and, because your depth perception is still available, you are much closer to the aim you need. And your peripheral sight can detect things getting into the line of sight that you don't want to shoot.

                  In short your situational awareness is better.

                  With open sights it is easier to learn this.

                  At least that is how I was taught.
                  Iím not racists, I have republican friends. Radio show host.
                  - "The essence of tyranny is the denial of complexity". -Jacob Burkhardt
                  - "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds" - Emerson
                  - "People should not be afraid of it's government, government should be afraid of it's People." - Line from V for Vendetta
                  - If software were as unreliable as economic theory, there wouldn't be a plane made of anything other than paper that could get off the ground. Jim Fawcette
                  - "Let me now state what seems to me the decisive objection to any conservatism which deserves to be called such. It is that by its very nature it cannot offer an alternative to the direction in which we are moving." -Friedrich Hayek
                  - "Don't waist your time on me your already the voice inside my head." Blink 182 to my wife

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                  • #10
                    Re: Buying a rifle.

                    Originally posted by El_Gringo_Grande View Post
                    Open sights. With a peephole or scope it is easy to develop the habit of closing the eye not looking at the sight. That is a bad habit. Doing this affects your depth perception and limits you field of vision.

                    Even with a scope you should keep your other eye open. You can use it to orient your initial aim and, because your depth perception is still available, you are much closer to the aim you need. And your peripheral sight can detect things getting into the line of sight that you don't want to shoot.

                    In short your situational awareness is better.

                    With open sights it is easier to learn this.

                    At least that is how I was taught.
                    Didn't know that.

                    And about the used angle, I'm more than happy to buy used (I'm pretty big on console gaming), but when I checked out the Trading Post, there were only a few in my price range, and most of them were upgraded a bit to much for my taste (a red dot sight for a .22?).

                    Green Top does have a large selection of new and used guns, they have a whole shelf of Mosin-Nagat's for under $120.

                    EDIT: Leave it to a TGer to bring up situational awareness in any and all discussions. :-p
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                    • #11
                      Re: Buying a rifle.

                      Originally posted by El_Gringo_Grande View Post
                      Open sights. With a peephole or scope it is easy to develop the habit of closing the eye not looking at the sight. That is a bad habit. Doing this affects your depth perception and limits you field of vision.

                      Even with a scope you should keep your other eye open. You can use it to orient your initial aim and, because your depth perception is still available, you are much closer to the aim you need. And your peripheral sight can detect things getting into the line of sight that you don't want to shoot.

                      In short your situational awareness is better.

                      With open sights it is easier to learn this.

                      At least that is how I was taught.
                      Well, you're not going to be able to shoot consistently if you let your other eye look around at things. Physiologically, you need to limit the sensory input to your weak eye and use your dominant eye for sighting if you want to see the same results time after time. Squinting your weak eye shut, or looking at things with your weak eye will cause sympathetic nervous responses and distractions with your dominant eye. It might be good to train or plink like that, but if you're actually taking the shot on a deer, or in competition, or in some other situation where the shot is important, you're going to want to close your weak eye.

                      Oh, and depth perception is a bad thing when you're looking through sights. We get it because our eyes are a few inches apart and they each look at things through a slightly different perspective. When shooting, you're concerned with a single perspective, a single line that the bullet is going to travel. We try to get our line of sight as close to the line that bullet is going to travel as possible. Having another line of sight from our weak eye only confuses things...
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                      • #12
                        Re: Buying a rifle.

                        Originally posted by CingularDuality View Post
                        Well, you're not going to be able to shoot consistently if you let your other eye look around at things. Physiologically, you need to limit the sensory input to your weak eye and use your dominant eye for sighting if you want to see the same results time after time. Squinting your weak eye shut, or looking at things with your weak eye will cause sympathetic nervous responses and distractions with your dominant eye. It might be good to train or plink like that, but if you're actually taking the shot on a deer, or in competition, or in some other situation where the shot is important, you're going to want to close your weak eye.

                        Oh, and depth perception is a bad thing when you're looking through sights. We get it because our eyes are a few inches apart and they each look at things through a slightly different perspective. When shooting, you're concerned with a single perspective, a single line that the bullet is going to travel. We try to get our line of sight as close to the line that bullet is going to travel as possible. Having another line of sight from our weak eye only confuses things...
                        Understand that I learned (was taught) how to shoot for hunting purposes. Mainly small to medium size game. Often you don't have but a second or two to acquire the target, aim and shoot. Even with something like turkey it is rare you have a completely stationary target.

                        With that in mind you keep your eyes open for target acquisition. Depth perception is pretty important most of the time. You might be reacting to a blur on the edge of vision. Automatically closing one eye when bringing the gun up could mean you loose sight of the target for a fraction of a second, thus you miss and go home hungry.

                        You can teach yourself to not use the other eye when using the sight. Let it go lazy and conscientiously ignore any input that it captures. But subconsciously pay attention to anything that might spook the dear and ruin the shot. You have to remember that an animal doesn't just present itself, broadside, out in the open to you. You usually only see, say an antler or a hind quarter sticking out from behind some brush. You have to patiently wait, with gun aimed in the general direction, for a shot to become available. The deer might move feet or yards before that happens. Having both eyes open allows you to get an idea of what is coming next. It allows you to adjust to the situation easier.

                        When you are ready to shoot and you take in your breath to steady your aim, that is when I would finally close the other eye. But not until then. I personally don't have a problem keeping it open during the shot.

                        For shooting at something like a running rabbit with a .22 closing one eye while aiming seems, to me, not very smart. Those things move fast and can change direction very quickly. Have awareness of a upcoming obstacle or hidy hole or ditch letting you know what the game might do is very important. I guess with this kind of shooting it is more instinctual than it is actual, concentrated aiming.

                        I will defer to you for target or competition shooting. Never done it so I will assume you are right. That goes for big game at really long distances. Never shot at anything past 100yards except maybe for stationary bottles or wood floating down the river.
                        Last edited by El_Gringo_Grande; 07-02-2008, 11:11 AM.
                        Iím not racists, I have republican friends. Radio show host.
                        - "The essence of tyranny is the denial of complexity". -Jacob Burkhardt
                        - "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds" - Emerson
                        - "People should not be afraid of it's government, government should be afraid of it's People." - Line from V for Vendetta
                        - If software were as unreliable as economic theory, there wouldn't be a plane made of anything other than paper that could get off the ground. Jim Fawcette
                        - "Let me now state what seems to me the decisive objection to any conservatism which deserves to be called such. It is that by its very nature it cannot offer an alternative to the direction in which we are moving." -Friedrich Hayek
                        - "Don't waist your time on me your already the voice inside my head." Blink 182 to my wife

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                        • #13
                          Re: Buying a rifle.

                          Shooting with my weak eye open came naturally to me. I find it unnatural to close it, although it doesn't seem to make any difference if I do. But, my gf can't shoot straight without her weak eye closed. Maybe it depends on what feels most comfortable to the individual?

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                          • #14
                            Re: Buying a rifle.

                            Originally posted by sordavie View Post
                            Shooting with my weak eye open came naturally to me. I find it unnatural to close it, although it doesn't seem to make any difference if I do. But, my gf can't shoot straight without her weak eye closed. Maybe it depends on what feels most comfortable to the individual?

                            Could very well be a personal thing.

                            I did almost all my shooting at small game, mainly game birds like quail and dove. I had a very bad shot to kill ratio and the guys I went hunting with told me to keep both eyes open and my ratio went up instantly.

                            I think it was because when hunting that type of game the target is often moving directly away or towards you very rapidly. Depth perception plays a role, i believe, in those types of shots.

                            I also noticed that bow hunters rarely closed one eye.
                            Iím not racists, I have republican friends. Radio show host.
                            - "The essence of tyranny is the denial of complexity". -Jacob Burkhardt
                            - "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds" - Emerson
                            - "People should not be afraid of it's government, government should be afraid of it's People." - Line from V for Vendetta
                            - If software were as unreliable as economic theory, there wouldn't be a plane made of anything other than paper that could get off the ground. Jim Fawcette
                            - "Let me now state what seems to me the decisive objection to any conservatism which deserves to be called such. It is that by its very nature it cannot offer an alternative to the direction in which we are moving." -Friedrich Hayek
                            - "Don't waist your time on me your already the voice inside my head." Blink 182 to my wife

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Buying a rifle.

                              I bought a Rossi Matched Pair rifle (.22/410) and like it a lot.. good bang for the buck (pun intended). It's very well made for the under $200 I spent on it. It's a single shot break barrel.

                              Having the .22LR barrel and the 410 barrel gives a little variety to play with. They also make a Trifecta model with three barrels - .22LR, 20 gauge, and .44 mag for under $300.. nice deal.
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