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  • Post Secondary Institutions

    Alrighty, a little background first.
    My school has a program called Health and Career, which gives people a good idea about what it takes to live in this world, how to reach their goals, and how to be healthy.
    It's a very helpful thing, from my perspective.
    Anyways, in grade 10, there's a class that takes up a block on the timetable called Planning 10 (imaginative, no?), which is just further preparation for real life. I'm doing it online over summer so I can take up another class (Introductory Guitar :D).

    The point is coming, just a little more explanation.
    It's gotten me thinking about what universities/colleges I could attend for my post secondary education. I'm thinking the University of BC as it's just over an hour away, more if there's traffic.

    And now to the point!

    What post secondary institutions would you recommend, that have an excellent science department?
    sigpic

  • #2
    Re: Post Secondary Institutions

    Brain, as much I think planning for the future is important, don't freak out about it just yet. You are already ahead of the game by thinking about what you would like to do.

    From my personal experience, life throws so many curveballs, that sometimes you end up going somewhere or doing something completely different than you had expected even a few months prior.

    My advice is to keep your options open, and be open to many different paths in life.

    Just make sure they lead somewhere, and always keep moving forward, in any direction. You would be amazed how many people are like "I really want to do "BLANK" and then I ask them why they aren't doing it. I usually get responses like "I don't know, maybe later down the road...". They wan't something, but they don't want to change, thus they don't change, stay stagnant, and never accomplish their dream or goal. Moving forward is moving forward.

    Sorry I had to insert my little rant inside of your thread :(

    Keep up that interest and spirit ;)
    |TG-X|Turkish

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    • #3
      Re: Post Secondary Institutions

      Heh, I'm far from freaking out, Turk. Just like having an idea of where I may go.

      But honestly, I'm 90% sure i'm studying a science or something academic. It's what I'm best at. That and video games. :row__573:

      I don't think i would be able to stand any other occupation, and if i was in one, I'd be doing my best to say out of it.

      Thanks for your input, though.
      sigpic

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      • #4
        Re: Post Secondary Institutions

        Originally posted by TurkishDelight View Post
        Brain, as much I think planning for the future is important, don't freak out about it just yet. You are already ahead of the game by thinking about what you would like to do.

        From my personal experience, life throws so many curveballs, that sometimes you end up going somewhere or doing something completely different than you had expected even a few months prior.

        My advice is to keep your options open, and be open to many different paths in life.

        Just make sure they lead somewhere, and always keep moving forward, in any direction. You would be amazed how many people are like "I really want to do "BLANK" and then I ask them why they aren't doing it. I usually get responses like "I don't know, maybe later down the road...". They wan't something, but they don't want to change, thus they don't change, stay stagnant, and never accomplish their dream or goal. Moving forward is moving forward.

        Sorry I had to insert my little rant inside of your thread :(

        Keep up that interest and spirit ;)

        Nah its a good thing you put your own input and opinion/experiences in.. I know a lot of younger people my age that go into not gangs but more of family of friends just to find out about stuff thats later in life and all.

        I'm somewhat in the same posistion as brain right now though, going into Junior year of High school, not really wanting to get married so I don't bring any chick down since I'm planning on going into the military to pay for college but same time thinking it would be kind of nice to settle down (nearly impossible with the military carrers, I'm looking into Air Force stuff)

        And off of that how many people we got here that did ROTCing? What type of kid were you in HS and what were experiences in military like?

        I'm thinking that if I stay in long enough I definitely would move up the ranks and if its possible for me to be a pilot in the air force then that would leave me for something to do once I retired from that, and if I don't get to become a pilot I could just stay in the military since they make pretty good wages, enough to be able to retire on when 60 I'm guessing.
        "A Veteran is someone who , at one point in their life, wrote a blank check made payable to
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        • #5
          Re: Post Secondary Institutions

          GI Bill does not apply to everyone. Don't think that just because you're in the military that you'll get your "free education."

          Air Force is extremely overmanned. The only ways to really become a pilot is to go to the AFA or OTS 4 years after you enlist. Even then, you must have perfect vision.

          Oh yeah, and god help you if you admit to drug use.
          Skud


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          • #6
            Re: Post Secondary Institutions

            Originally posted by TheSkudDestroyer View Post
            GI Bill does not apply to everyone. Don't think that just because you're in the military that you'll get your "free education."
            Everyone that serves honorably and wants to participate in the GI Bill may do so. It does apply to everyone in the military. But it's not enough to pay for a four year degree...

            The Montgomery GI Bill - Active Duty (MGIB) states that active duty members forfeit $100 per month for 12 months; if they use the benefits, they receive as of 2007 $1101 monthly as a full time student (tiered at lower rates for less-than-full time) for a maximum of 36 months of education benefits. This benefit may be used for degree and certificate programs, flight training, apprenticeship/on-the-job training and correspondence courses if the veteran is enrolled full-time. Part-time veteran students receive less, but for a proportionately longer period. Veterans from the reserve have different eligibility requirements and different rules on receiving benefits. MGIB may also be used while active, but as each service has additional educational benefit programs for active duty members most delay using MGIB benefits until after separation, discharge or retirement.
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            • #7
              Re: Post Secondary Institutions

              I'll start at the top. Brain: good deal thinking about it now. That shows that you're a step above your contemporaries who are probably more concerned with partying at this point in their lives. Good work.

              Now, as far as schools to consider, it really entirely depends on what manner of science you're interested in. Science is a HUGE field. Psychology, engineering, biology, chemistry, physics...theres a myriad of fields and each one has many many possible degrees you can earn from it. What you need to do is to consider exactly what you want.

              Now, at 15 or 16, I can tell you that you probably dont have the slightest clue. Even if you do, chances are that you're going to change that before you reach your destination.

              That being said, find a school you want to go to. It really doesnt matter where. All schools in the US have general education requirements you have to earn to graduate. That means that no matter what your major is, you still have to take things like english, math, history, and foreign language. Colleges also allow you to enroll as an undeclared major for the first two years, basically saying that you havent yet decided what your final college plans are. That, IMO, is the best way to go if you're not 100% positive about your career plans. You have two years to take classes, soak it up and figure out what you want. Use those two years to crank out all the general education requirements and you can spend your last two (or three depending on your major) focusing entirely on your major intensive classes.

              So like I said, pick a place and go there. You can always transfer schools if you decide that another school has a better department for what you want to pursue (assuming your grades are good enough). If you had a narrower view of what science you'd like to go after, I could probably recommend some good schools.

              Next:
              Originally posted by Fenian420 View Post
              And off of that how many people we got here that did ROTCing? What type of kid were you in HS and what were experiences in military like?

              I'm thinking that if I stay in long enough I definitely would move up the ranks and if its possible for me to be a pilot in the air force then that would leave me for something to do once I retired from that, and if I don't get to become a pilot I could just stay in the military since they make pretty good wages, enough to be able to retire on when 60 I'm guessing.
              Fenian, I was in Naval ROTC at the university of colorado. What kind of kid you were in high school doesnt matter as long as you do what you need to do when you get to college. We had kids from all walks of life and backgrounds in NROTC. Nerds, jocks, former druggies, alcoholics, party kids, wallflowers, you name it, we had some.

              I've explained ROTC a bunch of times before, but I'll do it again to humor you. ROTC is just like the rest of college with a few extra requirements and rewards. You generally have to wear your uniform all day at least once a week. Depending on your unit, you may have to do such things as go to PT (physical training) a few times a week, stand watch in the unit spaces, raise and lower the colors, do service projects for the school on odd occasion. At CU, we had to stand watch on the battalion quarterdeck twice a week for an hour each time. We only had to attend PT if we didnt pass our PT test (once a semester) with an excellent rating. We had to wear uniforms every thursday all day. We had Naval Science classes to attend. We had to attend two stadium cleanups after football games per year. For that, I had a full tuition scholarship, all books paid for, medical and dental insurance and a stipend of 300+ dollars per month. After I got out, I had a career as a naval officer waiting for me, guaranteed.

              Scholarships for ROTC are very competitive. If you want one out of high school, you need to apply as early in your junior year as possible. They dont just hand them out like candy. The selection process is much more rigorous than just getting into college. It involves filling out the application, writing an essay, getting recommendations (from teachers, public officials, politicians and the like), interviewing with a ROTC selection officer (always going to be an officer for whatever service you're applying to), getting accepted to at least 5 colleges and then being assigned to one. When you fill out your application, you have to list 5 schools you've applied to and have a decent shot at getting into. You rank these in order of your preference. If you're given a scholarship, they assign you to a school based on where in line you were when your scholarship was awarded. If you're the valedictorian of your class, you'll probably get your first choice. If you're in the top 10%, probably top 1-3. Top 20%, fourth or fifth choice. And you are ASSIGNED to go there, meaning you cant just say "oh, i think i'd rather go to this other school instead."

              However, there are other ways of getting a scholarship after you're in school. All ROTC programs have what they call a "college program", where you take the military science classes and do everything the scholarship students do without any of the benefits. If your performance is exemplary, you'll probably be awarded a scholarship. This can range anywhere from one semester in to your senior year.

              In the military, if you do your job and do it well, you will definitely advance in rank. You can choose to stay in or get out after your mandatory ROTC commitment is up (generally 4 years after graduation). If you want to be a pilot, you're going to have to work very hard and have the best grades in college that you possibly can because flight school slots are very limited and they only want the best. Both of my parents were in the navy for 25+ years as officers (both retired as Commanders) and they now live comfortably on their retirement pay, which is approximately 50% of what their active duty pay was when they retired. They get that benefit, as well as life insurance and health/dental insurance for the rest of their lives. So yes, being an officer for 20 years (required to retire at max retirement pay) will definitely allow you to live decently by the time you're 60 and retired.

              Also, to reiterate what skud said, you're boned if you ever mention drug use to anyone that counts. My recommendation would be to quit now anyway, not just for the military, but for life in general. I'd make that recommendation to anyone. It's expensive and a waste of time and contrary to what high school kids seem to think, its really not that cool. Oh yeah, did I mention it can kill you?

              Originally posted by TheSkudDestroyer View Post
              GI Bill does not apply to everyone. Don't think that just because you're in the military that you'll get your "free education."

              Air Force is extremely overmanned. The only ways to really become a pilot is to go to the AFA or OTS 4 years after you enlist. Even then, you must have perfect vision.

              Oh yeah, and god help you if you admit to drug use.
              The GI bill, as Cing pointed out, does apply to everyone who serves honorably.

              Also Skud, you're grossly misinformed about the ability to be a pilot, regardless of service. You MUST be an officer to be a pilot, which can be achieved by graduating through one of the service academies, ROTC programs or Officer Candidate programs during a course of enlistment.

              Your vision does not have to be perfect 20/20 to apply for flight status, but needs to be correctable to 20/40 or better. All of the armed services allow laser eye corrective surgery for pilots and flight officers as of this time, and will pay for the surgery.

              As far as being overstaffed, that may just be a recruitment line. I know for a fact that the navy is STARVING for pilots right now, and from friends I have who are air force pilots, the air force isnt doing so hot on lining them up either. A big part of flight school is academics, which is where 90% of the trainees wash out and take up a different MOS. Most people seem to think that you just go fly. Wrong.

              If theres any other related questions I can help with, let me know.
              Last edited by Ferris Bueller; 07-09-2008, 07:47 AM.

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              • #8
                Re: Post Secondary Institutions

                Heh, I'm most likely gonna study a physical science (i.e. physics, chemistry, astronomy), but atm, I'm leaning toward astronomy or cosmology.

                And so you're saying I should just spend the first year or so acquiring credits, and then the rest working like crazy on the academic parts?
                sigpic

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                • #9
                  Re: Post Secondary Institutions

                  Generally the first two years. Most degrees require a total of 120+ credits to graduate. Of that, most states and colleges have 60 credits of general education requirements. That's approximately two years worth of course work. Some people like to mix and match if they already have a declared major, others like to get them out of the way first. Some degree programs require that you have them done first. For example: the undergraduate nursing program at CU-Denver requires that you have all 60 of your general education requirements done before you can even enter the nursing program.

                  In all, the way you orchestrate college is entirely up to you. Just make sure you know the requirements and go from there. In my experience, getting the mundane stuff out of the way first allows you a greater ability to focus all your attention on your major.

                  If you're looking to do astronomy, that's generally a post-graduate degree (Ph.D.) requiring an undergraduate degree is physics or another related physical science. Depending on your grades and SAT scores, I'd recommend Cal Tech, MIT, Stanford, Cal Berkeley, Johns Hopkins, University of Colorado, University of Hawaii and University of Ohio. All of those schools have excellent programs in the physical sciences and many of them have Nobel Prize winners teaching classes.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Post Secondary Institutions

                    As much as I appreciate the input Ferris, I live in Vancouver, BC, Canada, and will probably have most of my higher education in Canada.

                    Thank you though. :D
                    sigpic

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                    • #11
                      Re: Post Secondary Institutions

                      Does Canada have higher education??? J/K :p

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                      • #12
                        Re: Post Secondary Institutions

                        Originally posted by HiTestFest View Post
                        Does Canada have higher education??? J/K :p
                        That's what I was wondering :D
                        |TG-X|Turkish

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                        • #13
                          Re: Post Secondary Institutions

                          Originally posted by brain21 View Post
                          As much as I appreciate the input Ferris, I live in Vancouver, BC, Canada, and will probably have most of my higher education in Canada.

                          Thank you though. :D
                          I can't imagine it will be much different. Throughout the world, higher education trends the same: a couple of years of general education, a few years towards a specific discipline or degree, and then more specialized post-graduate and doctorate work.

                          Pick a school, even a cheap local school, get your general studies out of the way and then you should have a better idea of where and what you want to study for your degree.
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                          • #14
                            Re: Post Secondary Institutions

                            Keep this in mind.

                            Most professors consider freshmen worthless. They know most will drop out. Most the rest are only at University to party or because their parents want them to be there.

                            So I suggest from day one show interest in whatever you choose. Ask a TA and/or professor how you can help. Take the crap jobs. Help with data collection. Offer to go to the library to get the Journals they need.

                            The benefits of this are many. But what it really gets you is somebody(s) that can help you decide what you actually want to do. Even if you find that, say, cosmology isn't your cup of tea your newly found friends can and will guide you to subject that is your true calling.

                            Of course all I am suggesting is do some good old fashion hard work and you will be rewarded for it. This applies to many pursuits in life.
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                            • #15
                              Re: Post Secondary Institutions

                              Originally posted by CingularDuality View Post
                              higher education trends the same: a couple of years of general education, a few years towards a specific discipline or degree, and then more specialized post-graduate and doctorate work.
                              At MIT, "general education" means calculus, physics, and some "simple" programming courses. ;)
                              Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

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