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  • The Army Reserve...

    Hey guys. Well, I'm basically here to ask everyone's advice.

    A recuiter came into our class two days ago, and I had been thinking of this before he had talked to us, but he had kinda supported my option to think about joining the Army Reserve. I'm 17 right now, Junior in High school, and I was thinking of going into the Army Reserve to try and work using computers. One I love the fact that they can get me my full college I need, because I am not getting any scholarships as of now, and my mom, being single, can't afford me to go, so this seems like a good idea. Plus, I really could use the discipline and pride of joining the Army Reserve.

    Apparently, if I join now, I'd only go one weekend out of every month to go to like, pre basic training, and when I get out of High School, I start basic training. Recruiter said, which this is my only set back, is that there's a really good chance I won't be deployed. Now don't get me wrong I would go for it to serve my country, but I don't think I want to be deployed at all right now, and I don't think I could handle it. But, yeah, I sign up now, and after basic training the contract would be up, and I could either go to college with my full college money I would need with me, or re-enlist, and I think I would take the college option. But I don't know, what do you guys think is a good idea? Try and get into college after high school, or is the Army Reserve a good way to go?
    "...and they call me ready to deploy, engage and destroy, wherever you need me to be. I'm an American Warrior!"

  • #2
    Re: The Army Reserve...

    don't talk to scratchmonkey or switch............jk with you switch and scratch.

    There are quite a few guys at TG in the reserves and in the military, PM skudthedestroyer though i think he might have just left to return to the Airforce (he recently completed Basic).
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    • #3
      Re: The Army Reserve...

      Originally posted by Soulja View Post
      Recruiter said, which this is my only set back, is that there's a really good chance I won't be deployed.
      I absolutely recommend military service, but the recruiter was lying to you. Anyone that enlists now has a really good chance of being sent overseas.
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      • #4
        Re: The Army Reserve...

        Originally posted by CingularDuality View Post
        I absolutely recommend military service, but the recruiter was lying to you. Anyone that enlists now has a really good chance of being sent overseas.
        Oh wow... ok thanks for the heads up, that's the main reason why I haven't joined sooner is because I don't wanna be deployed... I'll have to keep thinkin' about it then. thanks you guys
        "...and they call me ready to deploy, engage and destroy, wherever you need me to be. I'm an American Warrior!"

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        • #5
          Re: The Army Reserve...

          Disclaimer: I have no personal experience in any branch of the military!

          Agree with Cing, you'd have to be very lucky not to be deployed somewhere. A buddy of mine in the USAF Reserves was sent to Qatar after dodging the bullet a previous time. Now, he was working command and wasn't on the front line, but was away from home, work, and friends for 4 months. Something to think about even if you aren't in a front line infantry situation in a combat zone.

          My opinion is, if you don't think you're up for deployment, don't join. It's a commitment you should be comfortable with before enlisting in the Armed Forces.
          "No bastard ever won a war by dying for his country.
          He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country."

          - Attributed to General George Patton, Jr.

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          • #6
            Re: The Army Reserve...

            I am in the British Army "reserve", the TA, and they were honest with us, we finish training in March, and go to Afghanistan in 2010. No crapping around, they spend money to train us to go, the reserve is now a legitimate front line force, which I assume is the same for you guys?

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            • #7
              Re: The Army Reserve...

              What do you plan on doing later in life? Are you definitely going to college after if you enlist? Could you see yourself making a career in the military? One thing to look into is ROTC. I'm in Air Force ROTC right now and I love it. It's allot of work when you pile schoolwork on top of it but in the end I'll have a great job serving my country, and I'll end up working a job similar to what I'd be doing as a civilian (I'm studying Information Technology). As far as scholarships are concerned I know the Army ROTC will pay for your entire education, but the Air Force does not (I'm not completely sure about NROTC, but I believe they offer full scholarship opportunities as well). I have to compete with other cadets for a (partial, not full tuition) scholarship and if you are not in a technical major tough luck. With Army though receiving a scholarship doesn't seem to be that difficult, so I suggest you look into it.

              One of my friends enlisted in the reserve when he was a Junior in High School. He's in his second year of college and has tons of money saved up, as well as the GI bill paying for his school. Granted he is probably going to get deployed in a few years, but he understood that from the beginning.

              I didn't join a squad once and this guy named Nardini took me into the back room and beat me with a sock of oranges.

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              • #8
                Re: The Army Reserve...

                DON'T do it for the money. I'm just saying that "most of the time" those who do it for the money are the ones who end up hating the military. Can't wait to get out, pissed at the recruiter for tricking them, etc. If you have thought about military service before you needed money, then it wouldn't be a bad idea. There are more ways to pays for college. Students loans can pay for most of it if need be, but a part time job can help. Anyway point being if college is something you want its possible to attain it, be it the military or student loans.



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                • #9
                  Re: The Army Reserve...

                  24 years retired AGR Army National Guard, 20 years working in SIDPERS (Military Personnel), 10 years fixing recruiters mistakes, omissions, and gaffs. Personally it I had it to do over, I would have joined the Air Guard or Reserves (my local Air Guard has the polar flight missions). Look at their computer training specialties.

                  If you like the Army, check out your National Guard units and if you live close to the state border check the neighboring state’s units. Check out your local reserve units: Army Reserve, Guard, Navy/Marines, Coast Guard, Air Force Reserve, and Air Guard. See what their missions are and what open slots they have. If you want the Army Reserve (or other) visit them on a drill weekend. Ask to talk to a member in the MOS you want. If they don’t have your MOS, well the recruiter is blowing smoke. Ask when they were last deployed or will be deployed. The Guard used to deploy only as units and the Reserves piecemeal, now it’s all parts are parts. If an Active, Reserve, or Guard unit needs your specialty to deploy and you have little or no deployment time they can scoop you up into their unit to wherever they are going. Your odds of never being deployed are low, you can personally be deployed and your unit can be deployed.

                  Remember Rule Number One: The recruiter is in it for themselves not you. The have a quota each month/quarter to meet. 100 referrals becomes 30 potential candidates becomes 8 signed recruits becomes 6 trained soldiers. A lot of legwork, long hours and fast talking. Their divorce and suicide rates are high than norms.

                  It you are still serious invite the recruiter to your home to talk to your mom and it possible a family friend with service experience. It’s like buying a car; don’t listen to this week’s or today only specials. Don’t sign anything till you are sure and have talked it over. There are all sorts of bonuses: enlisting, college, GI Bill, student loan repayment, etc… Get all that apply for the amount of time you are willing to serve.

                  Remember Rule Number Two: You are signing for eight (8) years statutory obligation of military service. This includes Active Duty time, Ready Reserves time (Reserves and Guard), and Inactive Reserves time (USAR Control Group: AT, Reinforcement, Standby, DEP, ROTC, Retired, Inactive, etc…). Most bonus options require 6x2 enlistments: 6 years Ready Reserves and 2 years Inactive Reserves. Have any recruiter promises written down in the contract (DD form 4) and bonus contract. Information Technology Specialist (25B) is 28 weeks with just BCT and AIT plus a week or two for hurry up and wait (i.e. fill week). Find out what your alternate specialty will be if you fail to complete the 25B course for any reason (washout, drugs, Article 15, needs of service, etc…). Don’t find out too late that your alternate is ground pounder, tread head or gun bunny.

                  Officer training: Everybody wants to be an officer. Commissioned officers are management. Most ROTC’s (and other sources) only make it to 1LT or Captain before the BS drives them out. Keeping good captains is harder than recruiting privates.
                  Look at Warrant Officer programs instead. Warrants are highly specialized experts and trainers. Warrant Officers remain single-specialty Officers with career tracks that progress within their field, unlike their Commissioned Officer who focus on increased levels of command and staff duty positions. The Warrant Technical Specialties require E-4 or higher grade and Warrior Leader Course.


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                  • #10
                    Re: The Army Reserve...

                    Ok thanks guys for the info on this, it's really helped me think about it. I'm still going to still think about a little bit more though, but thanks everyone. I'll update later on my decision.
                    "...and they call me ready to deploy, engage and destroy, wherever you need me to be. I'm an American Warrior!"

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                    • #11
                      Re: The Army Reserve...

                      As an Army Vet...if you want to do something with your life outside of military life (meaning you don't want to spend your whole life in), then I encourage you to check out the Air Force. They will more likely get you in a "technical" field, whereas the Army will make you promises then place you in Combat Arms. The Army taught me how to blow stuff up and shoot at people, granted all redeeming qualities, however it kind of tunnels you into only a few professions. The Army is really active in recruiting Intelligence positions, which might be for you if you can score high enough on the ASVAB.

                      Just a few ideas.

                      B
                      "Don't tell people how to do things, tell them what to do and let them surprise you with their results." Gen. George Patton

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                      • #12
                        Re: The Army Reserve...

                        Originally posted by Soulja View Post
                        was thinking of going into the Army Reserve to try and work using computers.
                        "Work using computers" could mean anything. It's hard to be in the work force and not use a computer. Stock boys and secretaries use computers. About the only people who don't are those who are too techno-phobic, and they're carried by everyone else as charity cases.

                        Try to be a bit more specific about your relationship with computers. For example, were I of a mind to go military (too old even if I wanted to), I'd try to be a flight line mechanic, as I find avionics interesting.

                        Depending on your interest, college might even be the wrong way to go. Get a degree, of course, just to have something for corporate HR departments to check off their application forms. But colleges aren't necessarily any good at preparing you for technical work. (I rarely use the stuff I learned at MIT, and tend to build more on what I got in the workplace and in community college vocational training.)
                        Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                        snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

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                        • #13
                          Re: The Army Reserve...

                          Originally posted by ScratchMonkey View Post
                          "Work using computers" could mean anything. It's hard to be in the work force and not use a computer. Stock boys and secretaries use computers. About the only people who don't are those who are too techno-phobic, and they're carried by everyone else as charity cases.

                          Try to be a bit more specific about your relationship with computers. For example, were I of a mind to go military (too old even if I wanted to), I'd try to be a flight line mechanic, as I find avionics interesting.

                          Depending on your interest, college might even be the wrong way to go. Get a degree, of course, just to have something for corporate HR departments to check off their application forms. But colleges aren't necessarily any good at preparing you for technical work. (I rarely use the stuff I learned at MIT, and tend to build more on what I got in the workplace and in community college vocational training.)
                          /Agree

                          I got into computers by taking an entry-level job swapping out off-lease Dells for Ford and following a script, and then working a mostly-scripted helpdesk. I knew a lot about computers, but the corporate-level networks and whatnot were something I had very little knowledge of. And NO knowledge of server OSes whatsoever.

                          7 years later (5 years of applicable experience), with the experience I gained I can pretty much ignore jobs titled "Bachelor's degree required" (and I typically avoid businesses who state that, as most sane IT managers pick real-life experience over what you did in a lab) because I have equivalent experience, and simply worked my way up and learned everything as I went.

                          Had I not ventured off to California (though I arguably acquired the best experience with the jobs I took out there) and followed up with a couple of specific courses (like Terminal-Services specific training for example), I probably would have a house and a 3 series BMW by age 25. Though the money isn't everything. At this point, once I have a new job [at my career level], I could buy a house if I wanted to. That is, if I wanted to stay in Michigan. Which I don't.

                          Computers are stressful. But point being, I'm adding to the above commentary on "really think about what you ultimately want to do" before you enlist. The military isn't a job you join, then go "OOPS", and just quit. I'm speaking from the point of being a military brat, as well, and having a line of military service going back many years in my family.
                          "But way back where I come from, we never mean to bother. We don't like to make our passions other peoples' concern." -Dar Williams
                          Former Captain of the 55th Infantry Division

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                          • #14
                            Re: The Army Reserve...

                            This is all great advice from everyone. If you don't want to be deployed, don't join at all. Plain and simple. I spent 5 of my 6 year commitment in the Air Force Reserves, activated. Please don't get me wrong. I LOVED every bit of it and really miss it. Being active within the Guard or Reserves can be extremely rewarding. But you need to do it for service for your country above all else. I could care less about the benefits. It was the mission that made me happy.

                            As stated above from Nardine, ROTC is a fantastic path to go down if you're not ready to be deployed yet, but want to in the future. You get your college education, a commission, and it's a great college experience. I spent my first year of college in ROTC, but got out because I decided to go enlisted instead (because I wanted an enlisted only position). Even though I didn't complete it or get my commission, it was extremely rewarding and I thoroughly enjoyed it. Be prepared for 5 AM P.T., though. The Physical portion of ROTC was actually more strenuous than in Basic Training! Got me in great shape, though.

                            Good luck with your choices and take a good look at everyone's advice here. LOT's of experience in this thread.
                            "Common sense is not so common." -Voltaire

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                            • #15
                              Re: The Army Reserve...

                              ROTC and College are two good ways to go. ROTC gives you an officer's billet out of college, plus you take your college experience with you into the military. After that mandatory time served you have a whole host of options opened to you, both in and out of the military.

                              **

                              "Remember to pillage BEFORE you burn!"




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