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  • Great White Shark Attack

    I have been a TG member for over two years and understand it is about community.

    I brief surmise of who I am would be a creature of the sea. I am Mediterranean blooded. Corsican. Also, I have family that live by the sea in the south of France, in Cannes. I was raised there in summers past and would look into the deep blue, knowing Great Whites are out there before it was even reported well in Biological circles. Also I am English. If one thing about the nature of the English is the sea. I even describe myself as a 17th Century British frigate.

    Recently, an event took place that left me in utter shock. I wont go into details until I understand more myself.. But as a community I understand we give each other advise.

    So here is the rub. This event I can only describe in shock and panic like that when a Great White Shark attacks. The only other way is to think how it must be like to be on a real battlefield, with hell going and you desperately needing your friends about you. The real deal. Life doesn't get more clear at that moment and it is terror mixed with imminent danger. I play PR and that is fun. The real thing is by far replaced and when describing this to friends you must make this awareness, as like them I can bimble about with the best of them, even if I think it is tough.

    I'd like to hear stories of veterans here. When they are in the grass and the bullets are flying. I want to know how they coped. I guess here there are more vets than shark attack survivors.

    I outlaid information because to me the shark is my animal spirit it seems. I want to plug in to my spirit for guidance. The sea to me is important symbolically. I even come from Bath, Aqua Sulis, home of the Earth Goddess of water. Old country. I'm a water boy alright.

    So please keep this respectful. It is a respectful question: Veterans at that very point of the world changing colour, and reality kicking in, when danger was infront of you and you look to your friends, how did you cope?

  • #2
    Re: Great White Shark Attack

    It's called training mate. When guys are in the midst of stuff, most of their action should be instant "Reaction" which has been taught to them, time and time and time again. As a result, most will probably testify to reacting to that particular environment and dealing with it, rather than burying ones head in the sand and hoping the problem goes away!
    BlackDog1




    "What we do in life... echoes in eternity!"

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    • #3
      Re: Great White Shark Attack

      Yeah, I kinda answered the question to myself as soon as I wrote it but can't edit or delete the thread anymore.

      Thanks for the answer though.

      Admin you can delete this thread, it's irrelevant now.

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      • #4
        Re: Great White Shark Attack

        Definately training. I can't tell you how many hours of "up downs" I've done where basically you raise your rifle, practicing aiming and switching to and from safe. So many times that its second nature to me when raising my rifle. And thats just one tiny aspect of training.

        I would compare it to a sports skill. For instance a basketball player may spend countless hours fine tuning the mechanics in his shot but during game time hes not thinking about the mechanics....its just second nature.
        __________________
        |TG|||---DoRo---||

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        • #5
          Re: Great White Shark Attack

          Originally posted by Blackdog1-22 Reg.SAS View Post
          It's called training mate.
          Good point.

          I ponder: When "bad apple" soldiers and cops act in an unprofessional manner (such as in the tales in the "cop hate" thread), is that a failure of training?
          Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

          snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

          Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

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          • #6
            Re: Great White Shark Attack

            no...it's the failure of the trainee to take his profession and training seriously. You see it everywhere, just cops and military sell more papers than a Best Buy employee. Also Blackdog's answer hits the nail on the head for you. Not many Vets will tell you their "war" stories, we tend to be tight lipped and unless you have been there most likely you will not understand. It's personal, not to you but for us. Hell the only person I talk to is my brother, because he has been there and has seen worst than I have and vice versa.
            |TG-Irr|Duc748s

            sigpic

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            • #7
              Re: Great White Shark Attack

              Thank you Duc. Respectfully, again I do not want to know war stories for exactly as you outlined. That is personal to you and others. I would like to thank you though for sharing your thoughts. I can not comprehend and do not want to.

              Both Blackdog and Duc have given the answers already knew. It is only relevent to these people in their lives, again I ask to get this thread deleted or dropped.

              This is a respectfull thread about coping in times of the unbelievable trauma and horror that can strike a person. It's been answered. Admin close this thread please.

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              • #8
                Re: Great White Shark Attack

                Tai - no reason to close as others might have similar questions and maybe this could help. I was hoping to not come off as a jerk but I believe in giving straight answers. So I hope I didn't offend. The best solution I can give you is to talk to someone, believe me it helps. Who you talk to is up to you but if things are "swimming around" in your head and you need to find some answers or closure, talk. And not on the internet, to a real person. There are a lot of groups out there with people that were in similar situations, so they can understand and help find out what works and what doesn't and offer support. It works so don't dismiss it, we can't do everything alone. Sometimes we need help and sometimes we have to ask for it.
                |TG-Irr|Duc748s

                sigpic

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                • #9
                  Re: Great White Shark Attack

                  Thanks again Duc.

                  Yeah. It was to do with a spot and the Big C. And being told to "wait to see if it grows" but not really talked to about the C at that time, so left in the dark swimming. I hadn't even thought of it till I left the doctor, thinking it was just some kind of fungus or something after recent travelling as I went in, and looking back at the 'wierd converstion'. I wasn't prepared to wait but act, I tried but couldn't it was too intense, for example cancer runs deep on the french side of my family. Both my grandfather and mother had it, mum survived after alot of treatment, my grandfather didn't. So it was red alert time and I wasn't messing around; I hit the roof waiting. So a second visit to the doctor and it is booked to come out in a month. I certainly called in the friend calvary during that time.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Great White Shark Attack

                    No amount of training could prepare you for a life-altering event such as being diagnosed with a dangerous disease. Outside influences can be anticipated and the best reaction can be trained into an individual's muscle memory. As for your situation, Tai, I say go with routes more conducive to such a personal event. Family, friends, religion, etc.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Great White Shark Attack

                      Am man

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                      • #12
                        Re: Great White Shark Attack

                        Originally posted by Gillespie View Post
                        No amount of training could prepare you for a life-altering event such as being diagnosed with a dangerous disease.
                        Or having your legs or arms blown off in the line of duty. Very sorry to hear your news Tai, however.... medical science is a great deal different today than from your grandfathers day and you should take some comfort in that.

                        If you have not read about him in the past, I highly recommend you read about one of the UK's greatest legend's that overcame adversity to the best of his ability and found a way to fight on.

                        Douglas Bader was possibly one of the greatest pilots we ever had in WW2, a true fighter ace that as you probably know, lost his legs in a crash landing. He did not let anything defeat him and swore to himself that he would not only fly again, but would fight again.

                        Sure enough he did and proved to the air ministry that he could fly a plane just as well if not better than many of the new pilot rookies and sure enough he got back into the sky again. Even the Germans who caught him twice I believe after being shot down, gave him a huge amount of respect for his constant desire to fight and to do what he could to beat his enemy.

                        You know your enemy and I encourage you to fight it with all your might, and YOU WILL be victorious!

                        Good luck m8!
                        BlackDog1




                        "What we do in life... echoes in eternity!"

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