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  • A recent comment on Kotaku

    Every now and then Kotaku will post an article with a featured comment from one of their users and I just though I would share with everyone. A long read but very interesting.

    http://kotaku.com/5430100/?utm_sourc...=Google+Reader
    Reapator, overlord of ponies


  • #2
    Re: A recent comment on Kotaku

    An interesting find. Thanks Reaper.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: A recent comment on Kotaku

      I find it interesting as well. Now, I dont have kids myself, so I cant comment from firsthand experience, but I've seen this go both ways with video games. The truth is that we're coming to an era where technology cant be avoided. It's standard practice for kids to be using computers in school now, and not just in computer class anymore. I've seen several schools (from elementary levels on up) where the school ENCOURAGES kids to have their own laptop at school.

      This forced immersion and the inevitable reliance on technology that we're rapidly racing toward means that kids need to have a background in it. Think about someone you know that cant type 50 words a minute and how frustrating it is to watch it. It's like nails on a chalkboard to me and I almost want to tell them "geez, have you EVER used a computer before?" Imagine how that sentiment is going to evolve in 10-15 years.

      Now, as I said, I've seen this go as horribly wrong as it does right. Yes, gaming does teach hand-eye coordination, has been shown to speed up ocular data processing and retention, and yes, even gives a dose of real-world knowledge from time to time. But it takes balance with the real world.

      So sure, you might be somewhat advancing your kids at an early age, but its important to develop those crucial things like social skills and education. I know books are moving into the digital era now, but it's still nice to hold one in your hands and have to turn the pages once in a while. It's also good for kids to experience things like skinned knees and broken bones from falling out of trees. The same can be said for playing in mudpuddles, having sleepovers, etc, etc. I've seen kids whose parents managed to strike a balance between the real world and the virtual and the kids developed into well rounded individuals by the time they reached high school.

      I've also seen kids who reached high school, never spoke in class, never went out with friends and spent every off hour on some kind of video game system (including computers). I've also seen kids at the high school AND college levels who will type "ur" in place of "your" or "you're" in essays. I've given FAILING grades to students for those kinds of things (back when I was a history teacher). Hey, if you're 16 years old and you dont participate in a class where the teacher is kind enough to never give homework, and on the one assigned essay of the semester you use text message abbreviations in a non-quotation capacity, you deserve to fail and your parents deserve to be flogged over a barrel.

      It's a fine and delicate line to walk, but if you screw it up as a parent (and I'm not ragging on parents, i know plenty of them and I know that there is no instruction manual and most of it is shoot-from-the-hip guesswork as to what will work and what wont), you can cripple your kids life. Eventually, everyone has to go up for a job interview, and if all your resume includes is character references from your WoW guild leaders and you dont know how to properly look someone in the eye, you could be in deep kimchee.

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