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  • NAS drive?

    I am delving into the world of NAS and want one for the home for back ups and sharing files with friends and family, I do not need it to be wireless.

    I will not be using this as a server for gaming or anything, mainly I just want it for backup and sharing with fast enough read/write speeds to and from the device, my network can handle high speeds probably faster than the drive itself.

    So This Drive just came out and it looks good from the benchmarks, I just do not understand 2 things in the benchmark.

    NASPT Directory Copy?
    NASPT content creation?

    These seem to be the slowest read/write speeds and I am not sure what they mean, does anyone here know what they mean, and do you think it would be a good purchase for my needs?

    The drive inside is a Seagate Barracuda LP 2 TB (ST32000542AS), I think the drive is non-removable. ;)

    I am new to all this NAS stuff, so any help is appreciated! :icon14:

    Iomega NAS drive 2TB

  • #2
    Re: NAS drive?

    Directory Copy is just that, you copy an entire folder and all it's subfolder and files worth from one desktop onto the attached storage. Often times with these one-stop solutions is that they do not offer the performance of a dedicated server box, so hence both directory copy (large and many files) and content creation (creating something in real-time and storing it directly to the drive) tend to be the slowest since these solutions often lack in the processing power range and multiple/RAIDed drives (which offer much better write/read speeds).

    Here's a more detailed explanation on how SmallNetBuilder runs their various performance tests in their NAS reviews: http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/nas/n...owall=&start=1

    If you're planning on sending files to the NAS from multiple computers at a time, these single-drive NASes will slow down to a crawl if not lock up altogether, so keep that in mind. The other issue is how much backup space do you need for the entire network?

    (As an aside, SmallNetBuilder is probably the best place to look for reviews on things like NASes, routers, modems, etc.)
    |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
    TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
    Former 9th & 13th

    Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
    Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





    SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

    TG Primer and Rules

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    • #3
      Re: NAS drive?

      Thanks Acreo, think I will do some more research, I would love a large multi raid setup but money is tight. :)

      If you're planning on sending files to the NAS from multiple computers at a time, these single-drive NASes will slow down to a crawl if not lock up altogether
      Is this true for users accessing files from online outside the network?

      Thanks.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: NAS drive?

        For the dollar, this isn't a bad solution for simple and 2TB of storage. However, since performance is really not a concern if you are not running shared applications or games from the drive, you might get more for the dollar if you have an old PC around that can handle a few big drives. Slap a fancy Linux NAS distro on it if you want to get more advanced features than just a shared place to store files.
        |TG-12th| tHa_KhAn

        XBL GT: Khan58

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        • #5
          Re: NAS drive?

          You might get more for the dollar if you have an old PC around that can handle a few big drives. Slap a fancy Linux NAS distro on it if you want to get more advanced features than just a shared place to store files.
          I have thought about using my old pc but I still use it with my TV, but I may look into this further, the old PC would actually be a better setup speed wise compared to the NAS, but it can only use PATA drives which have a max capacity of 750GB, I would want at least 2TB, worth looking into though.

          Thanks.
          Last edited by MrMojay; 03-17-2011, 03:24 PM. Reason: added extra.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: NAS drive?

            Originally posted by MrMojay View Post
            If you're planning on sending files to the NAS from multiple computers at a time, these single-drive NASes will slow down to a crawl if not lock up altogether
            Is this true for users accessing files from online outside the network?
            Yes, essentially. The problem is a single drive is great if you're performing one read/write task at a time (so basically simple file storage). So basically if there's 5 people who need to "sync" files with the drive, they'd basically should get into a line and after one is done, the next person goes onto the NAS and does what they need to do.

            Otherwise, if all 5 people went on, there would be a total of (at least) 10 simultaneous writes and reads. The built-in OS/firmware might prioritize in a linear fashion to give access to the first two people or it might not. In either case, it's gonna seem like files aren't moving back or forth for a majority of the users on the NAS.

            If you don't want to get into this sort of situation, you have two approaches:

            First Approach: RAID drives
            I'd probably build a simpleton box (basic one core processor) and pack it with several hard drives in RAID 0 (strip raid) or RAID 10 (strip and mirror with both benefits). That way, you have plenty of processing power and the RAIDed drives offer plenty of space and speed to allow several users to go on without completely taxing the I/O performance of the machine.

            Here's a more visual and more descriptive article on RAID 10: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nested_RAID_levels

            So with RAID 0, it would be:

            1 TB + 1 TB
            - each file is split in half and each half is stored on one of the drives
            - unfortunately, if one drive fails, then you just lost every file on the RAID

            RAID 10 would look like this:
            - there are several configs, essentially you could do it with 2 drives, 3 drives, 4, 6, 8...etc
            - theorectically you could do it with 1 drive, but you can see how stupid that is...

            2 drive config:

            2 TB + 2 TB
            - essentially does what the above does, except you have the mirroring benefits of RAID 1 (files are duplicated and backed up)
            - drives should be ideally set in in pairs, so that if one drive in a pair fails, you can just replace the drive and the RAID array would be rebuilt without any data loss
            --- however if both drives in a pair fails, then you are screwed as you just lost a whole chunk of every file stored in the array

            Second Approach: Separate Drives for Each User

            ** This is the way I'd approach it without needing to mess with RAID configs. Pretty straightforward and simple to setup. **

            So essentially here, you'd put in several few hundred GB HDDs and not RAID them. And then dedicate each drive to a single user. Again, you'd need the simple box from above, but this time we don't RAID any of the drives.


            Honestly, it's not the most ideal solution to use hard drives to backup hard drives simply because they typically don't last more than 3-5 years with heavy heavy use. The ideal solution would be high density RW disks (like DVD-DL disks, Bluray disks, etc). You backup essential files to one or two every week. Larger backups are then performed to a separate set of disks (which you reuse every time) every month (hence why they are RW disks). DVDs are pretty cheap per spindle. The big downside is the amount of time you'll be sitting there burning data.


            Another even further approach would be to back up to the "cloud". Essentially here if you have a managed server without restrictions, you could (with a very very fast connection perform weekly syncs to that server. The assumption here is that since they are managed boxes, any hardware failures etc would be fixed replaced without you having to worry about it. And since it's offsite and connected to the internet, you could get at it any place, anywhere you have a active internet connection.

            The huge downside here is how much data you're moving, how fat your local pipes are, and how fast the connection is. For most people this is not feasible for anything over a few GBs.

            Originally posted by MrMojay View Post
            I have thought about using my old pc but I still use it with my TV, but I may look into this further, the old PC would actually be a better setup speed wise compared to the NAS, but it can only use PATA drives which have a max capacity of 750GB, I would want at least 2TB, worth looking into though.

            Thanks.
            You could do this and use the second approach from above (dedicate a single drive to each user so that they can all log in to the NAS server.

            Make sure you check your BIOS to see if there are updates for it so then your mobo will recognize any hard drive over 1 TB and 2.2 TBs. If it's a really old board, you might just be better off building a new simple box if the board can only handle up to 500 GBs or something (unless this works for the biggest user).

            And Khan's approach of using a Linux NAS distro would be ideal. Free and simple without clutter.
            Last edited by Acreo Aeneas; 03-17-2011, 06:30 PM.
            |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
            TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
            Former 9th & 13th

            Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
            Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





            SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

            TG Primer and Rules

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: NAS drive?

              Ok thanks Acreo, I have some thinking to do. :icon14:

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: NAS drive?

                I am still considering using the old pc and daisy chaining 4 500GB drives inside it by stripping down the stuff i do not need as it would be a faster box with a pentium 4 2.6GHZ CPU overclocked to 3GHZ with 2 GB of ram, and as I understand it, the transfer of files depends greatly on your network, CPU and the amount of ram in the machine and not of the speed of the hard drive so the old pc is a good option for speed and there is also the learning curve of learning linux or Ununtu server editions. :)

                I have also read a review of the NAS drive I mentioned in my first post and the cloud features sound interesting, but would an old pc running linux or ubuntu outclass this NAS?

                Old PC specs are:

                Pentium 4 2.6GHZ overclocked to 3GHZ, runs fine.
                Asus P4B533 motherboard.
                2GB DDR ram PC2100. (I think)
                DVD-CD Rom. Freecom.
                500watt Antec PSU, quite old!

                I am guessing the CPU and ram in the NAS runs a bit faster electronically than my old pc, but still?


                Iomega 2TB Network Drive!
                Last edited by MrMojay; 03-30-2011, 08:44 PM. Reason: old specs

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: NAS drive?

                  Originally posted by MrMojay View Post
                  I am still considering using the old pc and daisy chaining 4 500GB drives inside it by stripping down the stuff i do not need as it would be a faster box with a pentium 4 2.6GHZ CPU overclocked to 3GHZ with 2 GB of ram, and as I understand it, the transfer of files depends greatly on your network, CPU and the amount of ram in the machine and not of the speed of the hard drive so the old pc is a good option for speed and there is also the learning curve of learning linux or Ununtu server editions. :)

                  I have also read a review of the NAS drive I mentioned in my first post and the cloud features sound interesting, but would an old pc running linux or ubuntu outclass this NAS?

                  Iomega 2TB Network Drive!
                  Yep, the old PC as a NAS box would outpace the Iomega hands down (assuming it's connected to the network via gigabit ethernet). You can definitely daisy chain the HDDs, just keep in mind that if these are older IDE drives, that you properly set up the jumpers on the back to have 1 master and 1 slave per IDE channel (each ribbon cable should really only connect 2 HDDs).

                  The old P4 and 2 GBs of RAM should be plenty.
                  |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
                  TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
                  Former 9th & 13th

                  Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
                  Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





                  SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

                  TG Primer and Rules

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: NAS drive?

                    Originally posted by Acreo Aeneas View Post
                    just keep in mind that if these are older IDE drives, that you properly set up the jumpers on the back to have 1 master and 1 slave per IDE channel (each ribbon cable should really only connect 2 HDDs).
                    That's good advice, Thanks!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: NAS drive?

                      I dumped my fileserver PC long ago and switched to a Synology DS 207+ NAS (2x 1TB RAID1), because it's smaller, quieter, consumes less power and you don't have to troubleshoot if the GFX fries one day, because it doesn't have one ;)
                      If the PC is the financially sound solution for you, then go for it. And if you can learn a bit about Linux in the process, that's time well invested too.
                      former TacticalGamer European Division



                      A Tactical Gamer since 2005 (the glorious days of BF2)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: NAS drive?

                        I am still considering the NAS because it will cost me about 300 euros for 4 500GB PATA drives, 500GB SATA drives would only cost about 160 because they are more popular and sell better, which is a shame but that's supply and demand for you.

                        The NAS I am looking at is about 170 euros.

                        I also like that it uses very little power and that it is quite small compared to the old war horse as I will be connecting it to the hub under my stairs which is tight for room, I could throw the old PC in there but with the NAS I can mount it onto the wall beside the hub.

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