Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The fanless spinning heatsink

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The fanless spinning heatsink

    http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/8...ink-is-the-fan

    Thereís a fundamental flaw with fan-and-heatsink cooling systems: no matter how hard the fan blows, a boundary layer of motionless, highly-insulating air remains on the heatsink. You can increase the size of the heatsink and you can blow more air, but ultimately the boundary layer prevents the system from being efficient...But what if you did away with the fan? What if the heatsink itself rotated? Well, believe it or not, rotating the heat exchanger obliterates the boundary layer, removes the need for a fan, and itís so efficient that it can operate at low and very quiet speeds.

  • #2
    Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

    I saw this yesterday as well and have to admit it looks pretty interesting. If the actual, functional design can live up to those claims then I will buy one!
    "Looking for brahs to come fight crime with me" - Unload



    Comment


    • #3
      Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

      I don't understand ... how is the heat conducted from the slug to the spinning part?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

        Through the impeller shaft.

        http://prod.sandia.gov/techlib/acces...010/100258.pdf

        Start on page 10.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

          The extra torque on the motor required to spin that thing probably gives it a poor expected lifetime.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

            I worry more about the bearings than the motor itself.

            I am interested to see if anything commercial comes of it. There is always a disconnect between the R&D exercises versus commercialization of sed R&D.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

              Originally posted by draeh View Post
              Through the impeller shaft.

              http://prod.sandia.gov/techlib/acces...010/100258.pdf

              Start on page 10.
              Through the air layer- "Heat flows from the stationary aluminum base plate to the rotating heat-sink-impeller
              through this 0.03-mm-thick circular disk of air."

              It is a pretty neat find and will make an interesting read.
              Viking

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

                Originally posted by draeh View Post
                I worry more about the bearings than the motor itself.
                That would be my concern as well.

                It looks like it's gonna be a pain to install...
                |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
                TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
                Former 9th & 13th

                Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
                Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





                SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

                TG Primer and Rules

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

                  Should be some interesting engineering if it needs to spin horizontally - since most towers, thus mobos, thus CPUs are vertical.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

                    Maybe I am missing something, but where would you need bearings?
                    Viking

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

                      it is still a fan on top of a heatsink... It's like that dyson fan... that has "no blades." sure it does, it just hides them in the base. All they did was push the outlet air through a tube.....

                      same concept. reinvent the heatsink / fan.... oh wait, we just redesigned it. If it works better or more efficiently then great! but don't call it something it's not.... a "fanless spinning heatsink" that has rotating blades on the top to move the air.... and is connected to a stationary heatsink.... and pushes air over fins....

                      got to love marketing.
                      Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former. -Albert Einstein
                      The two most common elements in the universe are Hydrogen and stupidity. -Harlan Ellison

                      If all else fails: "rm -rf /"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

                        Originally posted by DaViking View Post
                        Maybe I am missing something, but where would you need bearings?
                        The heat sink rotates connected to a shaft that is in virtual (~0.3mm air gap) contact with the plate bolted to the CPU. Like all motor assemblies it has bearings (or god help us a bushing that will wear out really fast).

                        Originally posted by =DdogG= View Post
                        it is still a fan on top of a heatsink... It's like that dyson fan... that has "no blades." sure it does, it just hides them in the base. All they did was push the outlet air through a tube.....

                        same concept. reinvent the heatsink / fan.... oh wait, we just redesigned it. If it works better or more efficiently then great! but don't call it something it's not.... a "fanless spinning heatsink" that has rotating blades on the top to move the air.... and is connected to a stationary heatsink.... and pushes air over fins....

                        got to love marketing.
                        Sort of. The heat sink is not stationary.

                        The innovation is that the heat sink itself is now the fan blade pushing air over its own fins. Like a traditional cooler it has a base plate sitting on the CPU. Instead of heat tubes that transfer heat to the sink it uses the motor shaft as the conductor to the spinning heat sink. The heat sink is designed like fan blades to pull in air at the center of its impeller shape and expel it along the curves. Their whole point was to design a cooler that removes the air barrier that is always present in traditional designs. Marketing phrases or not, it is a new concept unlike a traditional cooler.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

                          If it means I don't have to vacuum/blast the dust out of my heatsinks, then I'm all for it :D

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

                            Originally posted by WhiskeySix View Post
                            If it means I don't have to vacuum/blast the dust out of my heatsinks, then I'm all for it :D
                            An old toothbrush and a vacuum/set of lungs works quite well, recently cleaned all the gunk (and I mean Gunk) outta my PC by taking out all the parts and dismantling the heatsink (stock intel cooler), used a synthetic fiber cleaning brush which is used for cleaning machine parts, vacuum and some good old lung power.

                            Worked great, brought my temps down by about 12 degrees C, probably in most part because I replaced the thermal paste.

                            It took me best part of a day to do it. :( So if this new heatsink can prevent me from having to dismantle the HS and clean out all the Gunk in the fins I will be all over it. :icon14: Has to work well though.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: The fanless spinning heatsink

                              Okay, I was misunderstanding what you guys were talking about. It was said that someone was more worried about the bearings than the motor. I was including the bearings as part of the "motor" and thought you guys were talking about some magic bearings somewhere else, which I didn't see a need for.
                              Viking

                              Comment

                              Connect

                              Collapse

                              TeamSpeak 3 Server

                              Collapse

                              Advertisement

                              Collapse

                              Twitter Feed

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X