Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

August 2011 Rebuild Plan

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • August 2011 Rebuild Plan

    With my machine being so out of date and so many games coming out that need a little more "beef", I started a spec for a new machine.

    Here's what I've got so far;

    http://secure.newegg.com/WishList/Pu...umber=14420551
    • Intel 510 Series (Elm Crest) SSDSC2MH120A2K5 2.5" 120GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)
    • Intel 320 Series SSDSA2CW080G310 2.5" 80GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive
    • SeaSonic X750 Gold 750W ATX12V V2.3/EPS 12V V2.91 SLI Ready
    • EVGA SuperClocked 012-P3-1572-AR GeForce GTX 570 (Fermi) 1280MB 320-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready
    • Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) 4 x 256KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core
    • G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)
    • ASUS P8Z68-V PRO LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS


    It's a pretty expensive build at $1500, so I might be scaling back in some areas. The most likely cuts would be going down to the Core i5-2500 vs i7-2600 and potentially dropping the 120GB SATA3 SSD for an 80GB SATA2 SSD for my boot drive.

    Any thoughts/comments/suggestions?
    Last edited by Apophis; 08-03-2011, 12:08 PM.
    Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

  • #2
    Re: August 2011 Rebuild Plan

    To save some money i would definetly go for the i5-2500K instead of the i7. I did the exact same thing for my upcoming build. If you want to save more money buy a cheaper ram or just buy 4GB instead of 8(you rly wont be using all 8 anyways). and if you want to save more money, dont buy an SSD it helps but its not rly a must have. too expensive for what it does if you ask me.

    I am building a new pc at the moment to. when i first put all the parts i wanted on a list it was 1450 euros. After some changes(all the ones mentioned above) and some more cuts I dropped the price to around 1000 euros.

    Trick is to go cheaper where you can. cut in areas where it wont rly hamper your build performance wise.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: August 2011 Rebuild Plan

      Originally posted by Kwalc View Post
      To save some money i would definetly go for the i5-2500K instead of the i7. I did the exact same thing for my upcoming build. If you want to save more money buy a cheaper ram or just buy 4GB instead of 8(you rly wont be using all 8 anyways). and if you want to save more money, dont buy an SSD it helps but its not rly a must have. too expensive for what it does if you ask me.

      I am building a new pc at the moment to. when i first put all the parts i wanted on a list it was 1450 euros. After some changes(all the ones mentioned above) and some more cuts I dropped the price to around 1000 euros.

      Trick is to go cheaper where you can. cut in areas where it wont rly hamper your build performance wise.
      The memory is a must. I have 8GB right now and quite often I'm running out of memory as it is. I actually pared down the memory from 24GB to 16GB already to save some money.

      The i5-2500 vs. i7-2600 situation is different. I'm not sure how much of a difference I will see in overall performance with multiple applications between the two, but in either case it will be considerably faster than where I am now. It would shave off about $100 from the total if I made that change.

      I will likely end up dropping the SSD out of the picture as that will save me almost $300. I can add that in down the road if I really want to make that switch.

      I use my machine for a lot more than gaming, so that's a factor in all of this too.
      Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: August 2011 Rebuild Plan

        I don't know, I mean I have the intel 510 SSD and I find it the single best upgrade I ever made. My PC boots in about 12 seconds, instantly in TS chrome and anything else. I also put ArmA 2 on it and it runs sooooo sweet. But if you just want it for your OS you could roll back to the SATA 2 model. The difference between them in real terms will be minimal, and both will be so much faster than a conventional drive anyway. The i5-i7 argument is really up to yourself, and how much heavy lifting you will be doing. Like you said in TS, you do a lot of non-gaming stuff, so maybe keeping the i7 is not the worst idea. Could you possibly trim some fat off the power supply price? As for RAM, I say keep it. I have 6GB and sometimes I use well over 4 when gaming and multitasking, so I now take 6GB as a bare minimum for a modern build based on my own, somewhat skewed experience. I would keep the 8gb, incidentally I am considering going to 12gb myself in the future.

        EDIT: Ninja'd

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: August 2011 Rebuild Plan

          I listed an 8GB kit but the wishlist has 2x 8GB kits. So the machine will ultimately have 16GB.

          Good points on the SSD though. Hmm.
          Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: August 2011 Rebuild Plan

            I would recommend staying with the SSD, it is a worthwhile upgrade over using a mechanical hard drive. Many computer upgrades often look good on paper, but end up being very subtle upgrades in real world usage. An SSD is one of the most noticeable upgrades you can make in terms of day to day use. Also, I wouldn't recommend going with an SSD less than 120GB at this point. That space gets consumed very fast and SSDs tend to be at their best with at least 10-20% free capacity.

            I would highly recommend swapping that P67 motherboard out with the Z68 Asus equivalent. The Z68 is the newer, more complete chipset for Sandy Bridge CPUs and the motherboard costs are the same. Take a look at the Asus P8Z68-V Pro - $210.

            You could save about $50 going with a 16GB DDR3-1600 kit over the DDR3-1866 set. I don't think the faster memory is worth the added cost.

            1000W PSU is a lot more power than what you need for that build. Unless you plan on adding a second graphics card for SLI at a later date, I would recommend going with a 750W PSU. I run a Core i7 [email protected] GHz, nvidia GTX 580, 24GB RAM, 5 hard drives and my peak power consumption with a game running is around 500W. You could get the Seasonic X750 PSU which is pretty much the best 750W psu on the planet for about $30 less than the Cooler Master 1000W.

            Personally, I tell people that they would probably never notice the difference between a 2500K and a 2600K. In most scenarios, Hyper Threading really doesn't help much and the speed difference between the two chips is only 100 MHz. You can eliminate the speed difference by simply bumping the multiplier up on the 2500K. If you're interested in reducing the cost of your build at all, take the $100 here.
            "Looking for brahs to come fight crime with me" - Unload



            Comment


            • #7
              Re: August 2011 Rebuild Plan

              Overclock the processor whatever you do, there is stacks of room on those chips, I personally prefer a 'full overclock' rather than any automated turbo type features. I believe, perhaps incorrectly, that the turbo only speeds up 2 cores, throttling back the remaining 2, spreading the load. To echo other comments, SSD is one of yhe best upgrades I've ever carried out. Look for reliability as well as speed, 120gb minimum.


              Comment


              • #8
                Re: August 2011 Rebuild Plan

                Good feedback Voodoo. On a personal note, I too have a i7 920 at stock, did overclocking bring you any real term benefits? I usually stay away from it until near the end of life as I don't want to stress it, but these i7's were built to overclock.......worth it?

                Damn Wicks, Ninja'd.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: August 2011 Rebuild Plan

                  More great input..

                  In terms of the SSD, my OS and application/data drives will ALWAYS be on separate physical drives. So going with an 80GB SSD for my OS drive is overkill in itself in terms of space. Nothing gets installed on my C drive aside from the operating system.

                  Maybe an 80GB SATA2/SSD for OS and 250GB SATA3/SSD for Games/Applications?
                  Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: August 2011 Rebuild Plan

                    Originally posted by VoodooIT View Post
                    I would recommend staying with the SSD, it is a worthwhile upgrade over using a mechanical hard drive. Many computer upgrades often look good on paper, but end up being very subtle upgrades in real world usage. An SSD is one of the most noticeable upgrades you can make in terms of day to day use. Also, I wouldn't recommend going with an SSD less than 120GB at this point. That space gets consumed very fast and SSDs tend to be at their best with at least 10-20% free capacity.

                    I would highly recommend swapping that P67 motherboard out with the Z68 Asus equivalent. The Z68 is the newer, more complete chipset for Sandy Bridge CPUs and the motherboard costs are the same. Take a look at the Asus P8Z68-V Pro - $210.

                    You could save about $50 going with a 16GB DDR3-1600 kit over the DDR3-1866 set. I don't think the faster memory is worth the added cost.

                    1000W PSU is a lot more power than what you need for that build. Unless you plan on adding a second graphics card for SLI at a later date, I would recommend going with a 750W PSU. I run a Core i7 [email protected] GHz, nvidia GTX 580, 24GB RAM, 5 hard drives and my peak power consumption with a game running is around 500W. You could get the Seasonic X750 PSU which is pretty much the best 750W psu on the planet for about $30 less than the Cooler Master 1000W.

                    Personally, I tell people that they would probably never notice the difference between a 2500K and a 2600K. In most scenarios, Hyper Threading really doesn't help much and the speed difference between the two chips is only 100 MHz. You can eliminate the speed difference by simply bumping the multiplier up on the 2500K. If you're interested in reducing the cost of your build at all, take the $100 here.
                    I'm going to take your suggestion on the motherboard. Wishlist updated.

                    Still pondering the memory.

                    As far as the PSU goes, I did want to leave myself open for SLI, hence the reason for going with the 1kW PSU. In addition to whatever video cards and SSD drives I add, I have two normal 2TB drives that will be in the system as well. Maybe I'll drop down to a 750W PSU as you recommend and then if I need the extra power down the road, I can upgrade to a 1kW.
                    Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: August 2011 Rebuild Plan

                      So here's the current build with suggestions applied;

                      http://secure.newegg.com/WishList/Pu...umber=14420551
                      • Intel 320 Series SSDSA2CW080G310 2.5" 80GB SATA II MLC Internal Solid State Drive
                      • Intel 510 Series (Elm Crest) SSDSC2MH120A2K5 2.5" 120GB SATA III MLC Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)
                      • SeaSonic X750 Gold 750W ATX12V V2.3/EPS 12V V2.91 SLI Ready
                      • EVGA SuperClocked 012-P3-1572-AR GeForce GTX 570 (Fermi) 1280MB 320-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 2.0 x16 HDCP Ready
                      • Intel Core i5-2500K Sandy Bridge 3.3GHz (3.7GHz Turbo Boost) 4 x 256KB L2 Cache 6MB L3 Cache LGA 1155 95W Quad-Core
                      • G.SKILL Ripjaws Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800)
                      • ASUS P8Z68-V PRO LGA 1155 Intel Z68 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS


                      80GB SATA2 for OS
                      120GB SATA3 for Applications/Games

                      Still wondering if the SATA3 is worth the extra price in terms of real-world performance vs. SATA2.

                      It's back up to just under $1500 with the changes, so I saved in some areas and then increased the total by adding the second SSD.
                      Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Your mb supports sata 6.0 I really dont think the sdd is worth it for a few seconds less load time....not to mention that from what I have read ssd's seem to fail faster than good quality hd's. Let me say it this way, is there anything so important that the load time of an ssd is absolutely critical?

                        Sent from my SPH-P100 using Tapatalk
                        "Everyone makes fun of us rednecks with our big trucks and all our guns........until the zombie apocalypse"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: August 2011 Rebuild Plan

                          Originally posted by Jeepo View Post
                          On a personal note, I too have a i7 920 at stock, did overclocking bring you any real term benefits? I usually stay away from it until near the end of life as I don't want to stress it, but these i7's were built to overclock.......worth it?
                          The original Core i7 920 definitely held a lot of overclocking potential, but not quite as much as what these new Core i5 2500k and Core i7 2600k processors can do! For the i7 920 specifically, people shooting for the stars were getting around 3.8 GHz to 4.0 GHz. Personally I was looking for something aggressive, but sustainable which is how I ended up around 3.6 GHz. It's hard for me to tell you if it's worth it because I never ran this chip stock lol. I've played with different speeds, but essentially it has been running at ~3.6 GHz for 2 years now. My advice to you is to try out a mild overclock of 3.2 GHz which should be very safe yet still a substantial increase (FSB of 160 MHz for a 20 * 160 MHz = 3.2 GHz).


                          Originally posted by Apophis
                          As far as the PSU goes, I did want to leave myself open for SLI, hence the reason for going with the 1kW PSU. In addition to whatever video cards and SSD drives I add, I have two normal 2TB drives that will be in the system as well. Maybe I'll drop down to a 750W PSU as you recommend and then if I need the extra power down the road, I can upgrade to a 1kW.
                          This a common line of thinking and it is totally valid. A year from now, two GTX 570 in SLI will likely outperform a similar single card solution. But waiting longer than that, say two years from now, the benefits of adding a second GPU over buying a brand new one begin to evaporate. If you think there's a reasonable chance that you will add a second card then it makes sense to go with the 1kW psu you originally chose as it is only $30 more and guarantees sufficient power. (Although it wouldn't surprise me if the gold rated 750W could handle it anyways because it is a beast!)
                          "Looking for brahs to come fight crime with me" - Unload



                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: August 2011 Rebuild Plan

                            Very good suggestions in this thread and I have to agree with the majority of them.

                            I run -

                            i7 [email protected]
                            GTX [email protected]
                            8GB 1600Mhz Gskill CL8
                            Corsair 750HX
                            MSI P67A GD65
                            4x640GB WD Blacks in Raid 0
                            2x2TB Hitachi
                            120GB SSD

                            With that said, I would stay with the 750w PSU... you don't need 1kw to run 2x570s as I know people that even run 2x580s with a good 750w. Get 8GB for memory, memory is ridiculously cheap nowadays that you shouldn't limit yourself to 4GB anymore. In addition, grab the 2500k unless you do serious encoding, etc then you won't see the difference between the two. Grab a decent aftermarket cooler, and overclock it... it will be easy to overclock it 4.5Ghz/4.6Ghz without much work. Prime95 test the overclock, then you're set. Furthermore, my suggestion is to just grab one ~120GB SSD and throw the OS/few games on there... it will keep your cost down that way. If you really want to spend that extra $$$ then throw it on a 580.
                            Last edited by Kappa; 08-03-2011, 02:50 PM.
                            A.E.K.Δ.B.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: August 2011 Rebuild Plan

                              I'm probably not going to bother with overclocking. I spent too much time tinkering over the years and at this point in my life, it's really not worth it. If I need more power for my VM related applications, compiling software, and other such tasks that I do on a regular basis I'll just go with a beefier processor from the start.

                              Agreed on the memory though. There's no way on earth I would be able to drop back to 4GB from the 8GB I'm at now. I need MORE memory.
                              Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

                              Comment

                              Connect

                              Collapse

                              TeamSpeak 3 Server

                              Collapse

                              Advertisement

                              Collapse

                              Twitter Feed

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X