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  • New Computer Build

    OK,

    So I think after numerous tries in the past I now have the time, funds, etc. to make it happen. Plus my current Pentium D 2.8 GHz is starting to show its age :P. So I am going to finally build a computer. Basically it is going to be used for Video editing and gaming (specifically with Battlefield 3 in mind, although I know the reqs aren't out yet). I have compiled a list of parts although seeing as how I have never built a computer from scratch I don't know if everything is compatible or if something is a piece of junk or missing, etc. Any help or suggestions would be appreciated. If you recommend something else keep in mind that I would like to keep the price as close to $1500 as possible. So away we go...

    MOBO: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813157229

    CPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16819115070

    GFX: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16814130604

    PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817139005

    RAM: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820231426

    HDD: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822136793

    Optical Drive: Unsure, all seem pretty similar, suggestions would be appreciated keeping in mind the video editing aspect.

    Case: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16811139005

    Monitor: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16824236052

    Mouse: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16826104250

    Keyboard: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...%20Black%20106

    Network Card: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833189002

    OS: some flavor of Windows 7 64-bit (64-bit is correct for the amount of RAM I have correct?)

    I don't know if this is everything I need or not so if you spot anything missing don't hesitate to point it out.

    Thanks for your help!

    P.S. I am not planning on using anything from my old computer as I would like to keep that usable, so everything is pretty much going to be new.
    lTG-Irrl Argetnar
    If you hear the chatter of my Vossaraptor you're already dead.
    "Squad attack Tollhouse!" Experiment626
    "Cookies?" Argetnar
    "Yes bring your cookies too!" Experiment626
    sigpic

  • #2
    Re: New Computer Build

    Network card is a waste of money unless you just don't like having $80.

    The CPU comes with a DVD burner at the moment.
    |TG-12th| Namebot

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: New Computer Build

      Ok. Is there anything missing?

      I also have a question regarding inputs. Does the case come with the USB ports, ethernet port and 5mm pin inputs for mics and other assorted stuff or do I need to buy those seperately?
      lTG-Irrl Argetnar
      If you hear the chatter of my Vossaraptor you're already dead.
      "Squad attack Tollhouse!" Experiment626
      "Cookies?" Argetnar
      "Yes bring your cookies too!" Experiment626
      sigpic

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: New Computer Build

        Originally posted by Argetnar View Post
        Ok. Is there anything missing?

        I also have a question regarding inputs. Does the case come with the USB ports, ethernet port and 5mm pin inputs for mics and other assorted stuff or do I need to buy those seperately?
        Those ports are on your motherboard. Looks like you have everything you need in that list.

        A couple comments on your build:

        1. Right now I'm assuming you're going with the stock cooler on the processor. I would recommend picking up a cheap aftermarket heatsink cooler like the Cooler Master Hyper 212 for ~$25.

        2. Some people probably don't care, but I always prefer modular power supplies. I would recommend swapping your PSU for an equivalent model that is modular. It really helps with cable management and having a cleaner build when you can leave out the unnecessary cables.

        3. For the mouse, you may want to go to an actual store like Best Buy to try some out and see what you like.
        "Looking for brahs to come fight crime with me" - Unload



        Comment


        • #5
          Re: New Computer Build

          A single Caviar? You're not gonna spring for an SSD or at least a Raptor for your OS?

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: New Computer Build

            Originally posted by Argetnar View Post
            OK,

            So I think after numerous tries in the past I now have the time, funds, etc. to make it happen. Plus my current Pentium D 2.8 GHz is starting to show its age :P. So I am going to finally build a computer. Basically it is going to be used for Video editing and gaming (specifically with Battlefield 3 in mind, although I know the reqs aren't out yet). I have compiled a list of parts although seeing as how I have never built a computer from scratch I don't know if everything is compatible or if something is a piece of junk or missing, etc. Any help or suggestions would be appreciated. If you recommend something else keep in mind that I would like to keep the price as close to $1500 as possible. So away we go...

            MOBO: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813157229

            CPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16819115070

            GFX: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16814130604

            PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817139005

            RAM: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16820231426

            HDD: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16822136793

            Optical Drive: Unsure, all seem pretty similar, suggestions would be appreciated keeping in mind the video editing aspect.

            Case: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16811139005

            Monitor: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16824236052

            Mouse: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16826104250

            Keyboard: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...%20Black%20106

            Network Card: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16833189002

            OS: some flavor of Windows 7 64-bit (64-bit is correct for the amount of RAM I have correct?)

            I don't know if this is everything I need or not so if you spot anything missing don't hesitate to point it out.

            Thanks for your help!

            P.S. I am not planning on using anything from my old computer as I would like to keep that usable, so everything is pretty much going to be new.


            Okay, so I am going to go through your build piece by piece to give you suggestions on how you should proceed further.



            MOBO: Asrock is a great choice, they have been putting out some good boards for the P67 series, another one to look at are the ASUS boards. Their BIOS seems to be more mature at this point compared to Asrock boards as well for the same price point.

            CPU: I have the 2600k, and I must admit it's an amazing performer. Now you said you did video editing and gaming... how would you break that down too? 80% video editing 20% gaming? Or the other way around? Just curious as you may want to save the ~$100 and grab a ~60GB SSD for your operating system if you do not do time demanding video editing/encoding. But, if you're one of those types that need to have the bragging rights of owning a 2600k, by all means buy one... they are great processors.

            GFX: EVGA is a good choice and so is the 560ti. Grab another 560ti and you'll be set for awhile. I see really no problems here if that is what you believe with satisfy your graphic needs. Great thins about EVGA is well, is there lifetime warranty on "AR" models, but also their 90-day step up program. If you feel like the 560ti wasn't enough, then within 90 days, create a step up ticket and send the 560ti into EVGA with some extra cash and you'll get the 570+ or whatever you desire. I will add though, do not forget to register your card's serial on EVGA's website within the time period allowed after you purchase it. If you do not, you lose out on a lot of perks that comes from buying EVGA GPUs.

            PSU: Corsair is a good brand, one brand that does overshadow Corsair though is Seasonic. Seasonic is the standard of PSU's today and have the best internal components. Some of Corsair's PSUs are actually built with Seasonic internals, so you will be safe either way. I will add, as I believe someone else has added before, go with a modular PSU. If possible, a fully modular one... it will be worth that extra few $$$ investment, trust me.

            RAM: Gskill is a good set of ram. But, look for deals. I just saw the 2x4GB 1600MHz CAS 8 pair that I purchased months ago for ~$100 go for $50 a few days back. So keep an eye out.

            HDD: This is one of your choices I do not agree on. First, I would like to explain that SATAIII has absolutely no effect on mechanical hard drives and some of it is a marketing scheme. Our current mechanical drives do not have the speed to even fully saturate a SATAII connection let alone a SATAIII. If you want SATAIII, then go the SSD route.

            Now, with that said... I will explain further why I disagree with the 1x 1.5TB WD Caviar Black drive. The F3 1TB Samsung has similar speeds as the Caviar black at almost 1/2 the price. You can sometimes even get them for $50 per drive. I would suggest grabbing two of those and putting them in Raid 0, which will cost you roughly the same amount as the 1.5TB WD drive... but now you are getting 2TBs of space and much, much faster speeds as the two F3 Samsung drives will be working in tandem for your read/write speeds.

            Optical drive: I believe there is a ASUS one on Newegg that has like 2,000+ positive reviews. I have it, and I would just go with that.

            Case: Corsair, Antec, Lian Li, Silverstone, etc are generally all good cases to look out for.

            Monitor: I have been trying to get people to step back from the TN panels lately and convert them over to IPS type panels. Your ASUS choice is one of many over saturated, low-color accuracy reproduction TN panels that flood the market today. The Dell U2311H monitor is a e-IPS monitor that will blow away any TN panel you put up against. Thankfully, you should be seeing them at a much lower price considering a new U2312H monitor has been introduced. The difference between the two are practically negligible, so you my as well get the cheaper set that has had more revisions to fix issues. Really try to snag one of these if you can, it will be worth the trouble.


            Mouse/Keyboard: Both of these I believe are complete personal preference and feel, so I'll leave that up to you. I will suggest though to go out to a store and test a few out so you don't end up with a mouse that will cramp up your hand. Additionally, you may want to check into mechanical keyboards, some may require a minor investment but they are more than worth it. Mechanical cherry brown/black switches are amazing for gaming, and may be worth it to you.

            Network card: Don't need one, throw it out and save yourself the money. Put it on a better video card, or a SSD.

            OS: Yes, 64bit is correct for the amount of RAM you have.

            ____________

            CPU cooler: I will add this to your list though. If you grab a "k" series processor you my as well overclock it. If you choose not to, you'll atleast have better cooling than those abysmal Intel heatsinks provide.

            1. CM 212 Plus - ~$25

            2. Noctua D14/Thermalright Silver Arrow - ~$50-70+ depending

            Now option one will provide most users with what they will need. It will also give you the cooling to get that 2500k/2600k up to 4.5Ghz without worry. With that said, option 2 will give you the best cooling that air can currently provide and you can get up to 5GHz before you start seeing heat problems. Provided that your chip can stable out at 5Ghz in the first place.


            _____________

            Well, that's my input.

            :D
            A.E.K.Δ.B.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: New Computer Build

              For $22, these mice would be far better choices in my opinion:

              Gigabyte M6880 (Laser): http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16826146010
              Pixxo G235U (Laser): http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16826664019

              Both come in at $20 and both have high-DPI lasers with bindable extra buttons. Better than the rather basic Logitech you picked out.
              |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
              TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
              Former 9th & 13th

              Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
              Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





              SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

              TG Primer and Rules

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: New Computer Build

                I agree with what has been said about the 2600k already. If you are building this primarily for gaming, you would be better off getting a 2500k and spending the $100 you save on a faster GPU. Same thing with the network card, put that money on the more important components. Those two savings alone put you into either a nice SSD or just shy of upgrading the 560ti to a 580. I also agree with getting a better CPU cooler from the start. No sense getting a K series processor if you are going to keep it stock, and an overclock requires better cooling. Finally, learn from my mistake when you buy your DVD drive. I purchased the cheapest/best rated one I saw on Newegg and did not realize that it was IDE until it came time to install it. Those stupid ribbon cables really restrict the airflow in your case. Take 10 seconds and make sure your drive is SATA.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: New Computer Build

                  The mouse was just a place holder when i was going through my mental check list of stuff I need for a computer.

                  Anyways, changes I am seeing are:

                  -buy a heat sink
                  -different monitor
                  -Modular PSU (how about one of these?)
                  1. COOLMAX CUL-750B 750W: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817159111
                  2. SeaSonic M12II Bronze series 620W: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817151095
                  -Optical Drive with SATA
                  -Two 1 TB drives through raid 0
                  -Possibly more powerful gfx card/SLI two 560Ti 's

                  I do have a couple questions

                  1. As a first time builder I am rather ignorant of this, but I am assuming all the internal cables I need come with the components, correct?
                  2. How do I know if my PSU has enough power for the system
                  3. I read an article on building PCs and in it they used this gray thermal paste stuff. Do I need to pick up some of that?
                  4. I don't need a sound card do I?
                  5. What do I need to set the HDDs up with Raid 0?

                  Just to answer the question since it has been raised a couple times, I do a decent amount of encoding so I would appreciate the extra power.

                  Thanks for everyone's help with this!
                  lTG-Irrl Argetnar
                  If you hear the chatter of my Vossaraptor you're already dead.
                  "Squad attack Tollhouse!" Experiment626
                  "Cookies?" Argetnar
                  "Yes bring your cookies too!" Experiment626
                  sigpic

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: New Computer Build

                    1. Assuming you do not buy all OEM or open box, the needed cables should be supplied. All of your power cables are included/attached to the PSU and the motherboard you chose comes with 2 SATA cables. Your display/sound/input/etc. cables should all come with or attached to their respective items. If you plan on having 2 hard drives in raid 0 with a SATA DVD drive, you might need to pick up an additional SATA cable. Some of the DVD drives do come with a cable, though, so check that before you buy. Anything like an extension or unusual adapter will more than likely not be included.

                    2. http://images10.newegg.com/BizIntell...alc/index.html This gives you a decent idea how much you will need if everything is running 100%. Add some headroom for fans or USB devices like it suggests and don't forget that overclocking will also up the needed wattage.

                    3. You definitely need to use it on any heat sink you get, but in most cases it will either come pre-applied or they will include a small tube of it. You can take a look at the Newegg pictures and it should show what comes with it. You can always buy a small tube of it in case you need to reapply it someday. A $13 dollar tube of Arctic Silver 5 would last you a very long time.

                    4. The motherboard includes onboard sound that works perfect for normal speaker/headphone setups. You can get 7.1 surround from the 8 port analog outputs on the motherboard or you could use one of the S/PDIF digital outputs. There are some special things that dedicated sound cards can do that your onboard sound can not, though I am totally unqualified to give specifics.

                    5. Again, unsure of specifics since I have never tried to put together a raid array, but your motherboard specifies that it does support raid 0. If your motherboard's user manual is anything like mine, it should give a nice instruction sheet on how to set one up.

                    Since you will be doing some heavy encoding, the hyperthreading you gain from going with the 2600k would probably be worth the price increase.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: New Computer Build

                      1. Generally, the motherboard you purchase will include the SATA connectors you need to connect your hard drives and DVD drive. Obviously, power cables will come with the power supply.

                      2. There are PSU calculators out there that can calculate how much you need based one what you are using in your PC. Generally speaking 650Watts is more than enough for a typical, single GPU PC. You can go with 750W if you want to play it safe. 750 Watts should be enough for two GTX 560 Ti cards in SLI. There's a shell shocker deal going on right now for a Seasonic X650 650Watt PSU for $110 and it is a really good deal.

                      http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817151088

                      It probably expires soon. If you don't catch that deal, I would just recommend going with one of Corsairs HX models.

                      3. The stock cooler comes with some paste pre-applied and I believe if you buy an aftermarket cooler it should also include some. If you want to play it safe or if you really believe in having the best, you should get a thing of Arctic Silver 5 although it costs $12 I think.

                      4. Most motherboards include built-in audio these days. Personally I think it's good enough although some people may tell you to buy a separate sound card. For now, just use the motherboard's onboard audio and if you find out it isn't good enough for you, you can always buy a sound card down the road.

                      5. I would not recommend doing a RAID 0 setup for a first time builder. Yes it will make your hard drives feel quicker, but it can be complicated to set up for someone who doesn't have experience doing it and you also double the chances of losing all your data since you lose the entire volume if either hard drive fails. Just go with one hard drive for now.
                      "Looking for brahs to come fight crime with me" - Unload



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: New Computer Build

                        Originally posted by VoodooIT View Post
                        1. Generally, the motherboard you purchase will include the SATA connectors you need to connect your hard drives and DVD drive. Obviously, power cables will come with the power supply.

                        2. There are PSU calculators out there that can calculate how much you need based one what you are using in your PC. Generally speaking 650Watts is more than enough for a typical, single GPU PC. You can go with 750W if you want to play it safe. 750 Watts should be enough for two GTX 560 Ti cards in SLI. There's a shell shocker deal going on right now for a Seasonic X650 650Watt PSU for $110 and it is a really good deal.

                        http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16817151088

                        It probably expires soon. If you don't catch that deal, I would just recommend going with one of Corsairs HX models.

                        3. The stock cooler comes with some paste pre-applied and I believe if you buy an aftermarket cooler it should also include some. If you want to play it safe or if you really believe in having the best, you should get a thing of Arctic Silver 5 although it costs $12 I think.

                        4. Most motherboards include built-in audio these days. Personally I think it's good enough although some people may tell you to buy a separate sound card. For now, just use the motherboard's onboard audio and if you find out it isn't good enough for you, you can always buy a sound card down the road.

                        5. I would not recommend doing a RAID 0 setup for a first time builder. Yes it will make your hard drives feel quicker, but it can be complicated to set up for someone who doesn't have experience doing it and you also double the chances of losing all your data since you lose the entire volume if either hard drive fails. Just go with one hard drive for now.
                        1. Yes

                        2. PSU calculators are some of the worst things to actually calculate what you need. Reason? 99% of the PSU calculators out there only calculate what you're pulling from the wall and does not include the efficiency of the PSU itself. So when you actually calculate things, you end up getting a number much higher than what your system actually needs to run. 650W is actually good enough for two 560ti's in SLI and I even know some people that run them just fine with even less... that's including a few hard drives and an overclocked processor. One of the big misconceptions out there is how many watts you need to run computers these days.

                        3. Not much to add on this one, I do recommend OCZ Freeze though as it tested to be better than artic silver and many others and it doesn't require a "burn in" time like some pastes do. I think you can actually grab this stuff to at like $5-6.

                        4. Again, not much to add here. Your motherboard will have onboard audio, but soundcards will normally always provide superior audio over onboard. Asus, Auzentech, are just some to look for. Try to stay away from creative, it may be just a personal preference but I don't like there drivers. If you need X-fi for positional audio in games, Auzentech provides cards with them without the creative drivers.

                        5. Raid 0 is a very easy setup these days. If he is planning on throwing this much cash onto a computer, I would think he would also invest into the research involved into learning quickly how to do it. Additionally, Raid 0 will not make the drive just "feel" quicker... it provides a significant performance increase over a single drive any day. Yes, it does have a higher fail rate because you are using two drives instead of one... but I honestly cannot remember the last drive that has failed on me. Buy good brands that are known for low failure rates, and that F3 Samsung is a well tested hard drive.
                        A.E.K.Δ.B.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: New Computer Build

                          1. As a first time builder I am rather ignorant of this, but I am assuming all the internal cables I need come with the components, correct?

                          Not always. Most boards come with at least 1 SATA cable and perhaps 1 ribbon cable. Some boards may include more. Generally you won't find more than 1 or 2 SATA cables included with your board unless the manufacturer feels extra generous. So if you're hooking up multiple HDDs and have more than one optical drive (read: CD/DVD drive), then it's a good idea to pick up a few extra ones when you order your parts (or get them from www.monoprice.com).

                          2. How do I know if my PSU has enough power for the system?

                          The quickest way is to use a PSU calculator to estimate potential usage: http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculator.jsp

                          Most calculators assume you know enough about PSUs and can get your own PSU's efficiency (usually on the label or box) and work out actual power output internally. It would be very hard to make any calculator accurate given the wildly different efficiency ratings of every PSU out there (even the major brand ones). Also, depending on the granular options on the calculator, the PSU wattage and amperage given is a theoretical maximum. Meaning at some given point, your rig is not going to draw that amount of power. Typically I call this the "safe number". As time and usage goes on, most PSUs lose some of their efficiency and maximum load capability (internal hardware wears down over time especially heavy 24/7/365 usage).

                          Two other methods include:

                          1. Use a milimeter to measure draw. (Tedious)

                          2. Use a Kill-A-Watt. (Nice and quick) This is probably a good way to see what you are drawing at the outlet and if you know your PSU's efficiency rating at certain loads, you can quickly work out how much your rig is actually using (the rest is lost in conversion from AC to DC or heat exchange).

                          3. I read an article on building PCs and in it they used this gray thermal paste stuff. Do I need to pick up some of that?

                          Depending on your heatsink, you might not. If you have a Tuniq heatsink for example, paste isn't needed unless you mess up the quality paste they preapply for you. I generally remove the pads/paste that come with most heatsinks (especially stock heatsinks) and apply a fresh layer of Arctic Silver 5, Antec Reference, or another silver-based or ceramic thermal paste.

                          Most/some DIYers at least have one stick of Arctic Silver around for their building/upgrading needs.

                          4. I don't need a sound card do I?

                          No, unless you have great ears and think onboard sound sucks.

                          5. What do I need to set the HDDs up with Raid 0?

                          Up to you. It'll give you a speed boost in terms of write/read, but if a hard drive fails, you lose all of your data, unless you back it up to another drive or media.
                          |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
                          TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
                          Former 9th & 13th

                          Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
                          Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





                          SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

                          TG Primer and Rules

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