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  • 2D & 3D artists

    Guys, I have actually been pulled into a game dev project. It has been suggested that I learn 2D and 3D modeling and texturing software. I do not know where I should start. I don't know what programming languages would be good to know when dealing with this as well.



    Interested in listening to guitar playing and a good conversation, look for me on TS.

    "Hope is for the weak. I hope for nothing. I work for things. That is the only way for events to unfold." -Cleverbot

  • #2
    Re: 2D & 3D artists

    You're probably going to want to have a look at each of those subject fields and decide which one you have the most interest in as they are all very large topics that will be a lot to learn if you have never dabbled in any of them before.

    I'm more than happy to offer advice, but it's kinda difficult without knowing some more specifics about budget, licensing situation and the environment (in terms of engine, platforms etc) you are working with. In general though, Blender for 3D modelling, GIMP or Paint.NET for 2D work and Python for an introduction to programming. :)

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    • #3
      Re: 2D & 3D artists

      Well, I have been exposed to the basics of Java. Python sounds like a good language to learn or would C# be better?



      Interested in listening to guitar playing and a good conversation, look for me on TS.

      "Hope is for the weak. I hope for nothing. I work for things. That is the only way for events to unfold." -Cleverbot

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      • #4
        Re: 2D & 3D artists

        Ah OK. Depends on your confidence with Java then. For better or worse I always recommend Python to people completely new to programming because it provides a high enough level of abstraction that you can learn about basic syntax, debugging and generally get stuck in without having to worry about compiling, garbage collection and typing all that much. However, it's certainly limited in it's educational capacity simply because there is only a limited amount you can learn without 'looking under the hood' as it were.

        If you are comfortable with the above concepts and OOP from your work in Java then by all means give Python a cursory glance and move on to something else, you could definitely do worse than C# due to it's strong similarities to Java while introducing you to the C 'family'.

        Do you know what you are going to be using for the game itself? For example the Unity engine heavily uses C#, Unreal uses a language somewhat similar to Java. If you are willing to put some time aside and don't mind reading around a bunch then you can pick up any language, even diving straight into C is by no means insurmountable if it turns out that will be the most useful for the project itself.

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        • #5
          Re: 2D & 3D artists

          Making games is hard work... I've tried a couple of times in python, C++, javascript and c# and normally come unstuck with making AI :)

          I'd second Blender for 3d and GIMP and Inkscape for 2D if you don't want to spend anything. All are free/open source

          Whilst Python is by far my favourite programming language of all time and amazing for scientific or web applications I find it's a bit limited for games.

          I wouldn't touch java with a million foot pole but that is purely my opinion... The whole language makes me queasy.

          Unity and C# definitely the "easy" way to go in my opinion, c# is a pretty decent language, there are a bunch of unity tutorials, it has zero cost at the start, 2d support. a broad range of supported platforms and some pretty decent assets available. (You can also code in javascript if you prefer.)

          They do encourage a fairly loose coding style for c# which I don't like but it's really easy to make a bunch of stuff as a DLL in visual studio and import it into your unity project.
          sigpic

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          • #6
            Re: 2D & 3D artists

            2D and 3D modeling is not going to involve much programming unless you are programming their tools and/or graphics from scratch.

            As for 2D graphics, Photoshop is the industry standard and something you will eventually have to learn. If you decide to learn GIMP as well, that's extra, but in most job postings I've seen, I've only seen GIMP mentioned perhaps once or twice. And as far as I know, very few dev teams use GIMP instead of Photoshop, unless budget is some extreme consideration.

            3D modeling is going to be Maya and/or Max (Autodesk 3DS Max or Autodesk Maya). The two are probably going to be combined into a single product in the future considering the two have a lot of things in common now including interfaces and uses.

            As for programming languages, see what engine you will be using. Unity is very flexible (my dev team uses Unity) and can be programmed using a variety of languages, including Java, C#, and C++. Unreal uses their own scripting language which resembles C/C++, but isn't the same (there are even some custom libraries, etc). Kahn Academy is probably one of the better online resources for learning a programming language without paying for classes and it lets you learn it at your own pace.

            With my own development team, some pointers:

            1) Figure out if you are cut out for 2D/3D work. Not everyone has the creativity, know-how, and ability to use the various tools out there. Equipment and software can get very expensive depending how much art you'll be doing for your team.
            2) If you do want 2D/3D work, ask their existing artist to help you out. Show you the ropes, so to speak. It helps a lot since some of the tutorials out there can be dry and/or confusing.
            3) 3D work is going to require modeling, rigging (skeleton), and animating models. If you go the artist route, that is going to be a must down the road for games development. Probably the same goes for concept/sketch art, unless your team has a dedicated concept artist. Lastly, you'll want to learn how to create textures and apply them both in Maya/Max and whatever game engine tool you use (assuming it supports texturing in the editor).

            Usually artists are dedicated to a single and/or related tasks. In games development, that's: Concept Artist, Modeler, Texture Artist, Rigger, Animator, Level/World Designer, etc. In smaller teams, artists usually take on all or most of these. In larger teams, they might have 1 person for each task. See what your team wants/needs and what size they are.

            And welcome to the growing community of game developers! :)
            |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
            TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
            Former 9th & 13th

            Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
            Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





            SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

            TG Primer and Rules

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            • #7
              Re: 2D & 3D artists

              Originally posted by Acreo Aeneas View Post
              Usually artists are dedicated to a single and/or related tasks.
              Yeah, I had a friend who spent two years making roads for an AAA game :)
              sigpic

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              • #8
                Re: 2D & 3D artists

                Get yourself a wacom tablet, I love mine, they get kind of pricey though.

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                • #9
                  Re: 2D & 3D artists

                  I second the Wacom comment, couldn't live without it. Zbrush is a great 3d tool as well which I love more than air, though it has a more sculptural approach to geometry creation which is better suited for persons with good artistic and sculptural backround. It is often used in conjuction with 3d max & Maya to finish up high resolution depth information such as skin, clothing wrinkles and the such.

                  These programs often have very different UI and naming conventions for certain things, so you could save some learning curve later by finding out which programs you may be associating with and download a trial for those.

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                  • #10
                    Re: 2D & 3D artists

                    I'm not made of money... I have to look at pricing, but I don't know when I will hear back from any places I applied to. If I can't get a job over the summer, I may just take some C# or Python classes over the summer at the college I go to.



                    Interested in listening to guitar playing and a good conversation, look for me on TS.

                    "Hope is for the weak. I hope for nothing. I work for things. That is the only way for events to unfold." -Cleverbot

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                    • #11
                      Re: 2D & 3D artists

                      You can download a fully worrking copy of 3ds max without any limitations if you are a student, for free.

                      http://www.autodesk.com/education/free-software/all

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