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  • new lesson: mobos

    I would like to know the ins and outs of a good mobo. Personaly I like one with the most expandibility which now includes the number of CPUs and PGUs. And can you teach me about server types including their cpu.

    I would very much appreciate this. :)

    BeSiege82



    Interested in listening to guitar playing and a good conversation, look for me on TS.

    "Hope is for the weak. I hope for nothing. I work for things. That is the only way for events to unfold." -Cleverbot

  • #2
    Re: new lesson: mobos

    In terms of building your own computer, build for 3 to 5 years down the line. Don't overspend on a board because you think you can still use it many years later without having to replace it. Most likely, within 4 years or so you're "expandable" board will be fairly outdated where is isn't wise to upgrade just so you can keep the board.

    High-end consumer boards can take 2 single, dual, or quad-core CPUs nowadays. Memory max can range from 2 GBs upwards to 16 GBs. Most consumer boards will have several PCI slots, a possible CNR slot, 1-4 PCI-E slots, passive/hsf cooling for the north and southbridge chips, and tend to have some legacy I/O ports along with 4-8 USB 2.0 ports.

    Server boards tend to have integrated video (don't really need high-end graphics for server apps) or AGP/PCI-E expansion slots. They usually tend to be full-size ATX boards (9 x 12 or larger), features support for 2, 4, and even 8 CPUs (1 to 4 cores), good memory expandability, ECC RAM ratings, lots of PCI expansion room, and tend to be pricier then consumer boards.
    |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
    TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
    Former 9th & 13th

    Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
    Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





    SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

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    • #3
      Re: new lesson: mobos

      A good mobo has good compatibility with a variety of memory brands and has all the features you want. Getting a particular mobo just because it has awesome feature A and B when you don't really need it or it costs a lot doesn't make sense (ie. SLI).

      If you want a dual CPU board, get it. Unfortunately, it doesn't make a lot of sense in a gaming rig (I assume this is a gaming rig although you ask about server stuff). Servers need a lot of CPU power because they deal with many different tasks. Having multiple CPUs helps instead of one powerful CPU. A game is one application so one powerful CPU can actually work pretty well. The cool thing now is it doesn't matter since all the new consumer CPUs are multi-core and plenty of boards support them. My revision 1.0 Gigabyte DS3 wasn't very expensive yet it supports quad core (not 1333FSB though). A year later, I'm not even thinking about upgrading the CPU. My previous AMD 2400+ (socket A) lasted 3 years.

      What you want to look at is the board layout. Do you think you'll have trouble fitting your components in the slots and connecting the cables? Some are crap and put HDD connectors in line with the PCI-e slot. Video cards are getting long so you could have some cabling trouble, even with SATA cables. If you have a few PCI cards, you have to check if they'll fit. A lot of boards put a PCI slot next to the PCI-e slot but it's unusable because you ended up buying a video card that takes up two slots.

      - It's who you game with.

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      • #4
        Re: new lesson: mobos

        I used to go for fancy deluxe models that I would hope would future proof me. now I just go for the cheapest thing I can find.

        I spend the bucks on cpu and vid. mobo and memory I skimp on. I never end up using half the features of deluxe models...

        “Up, sluggard, and waste not life; in the grave will be sleeping enough!” Benjamin Franklin

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        • #5
          Re: new lesson: mobos

          I usually go for mid-range products from companies I trust. Like Sc1ence, I don't go for the deluxe ones since I won't use most of those extra features. But I also don't go with the cheapest since they usually crap out on me after 2-3 years of use.

          If you plan on using more than 1 PCI card (sound card, firewire/usb card, etc.), then I suggest looking for a full-ATX board. It'll be a little harder to work with, but at least you'll have 3-4 slots instead of the 1-2 slots that most micro-ATX boards give you.
          |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
          TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
          Former 9th & 13th

          Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
          Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





          SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

          TG Primer and Rules

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