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Remote Desktop Connection, Dynamic IP's, and You

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  • Remote Desktop Connection, Dynamic IP's, and You

    I don't know about you guys, but I absolutely love the remote desktop feature on Win XP Pro (run:mstsc). For those of you who are unfamiliar, Remote desktop allows you to log onto your XP Pro computer from any windows based PC as long as long as both computers are connected through a network or internet connection. At the bare minimum all you need to know is the IP address of your target computer and then the user log on information. If you don't have to log on when you start Windows, you will need to set it up to require logging on, as remote desktop needs to have user with remote desktop permission set up.

    First and foremost, you need to enable Remote Desk Top.
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/u...moteintro.mspx
    Those are the basic set up instructions. If your computer is connected directly to your modem and your IP address is static (meaning it doesn't change) thats basically all you need to know aside from opening port 3389 if you have fire walls up. Enjoy remote desktop.

    I thought I'd share some of the more complicated set up details with you guys since getting remote desktop up and running may be a bit difficult on the standard home network set up which usually consists of a dynamic IP (an IP address that changes because your ISP and/or router changes it regularly) and a gateway (your router) that may require port forwarding.

    Obstacle #1: Your ISP assigns you a Dynamic IP

    If your IP address changes because your ISP assigns a dynamic IP, you won't be able to connect to remote desktop when you're away from home because you'll have no way of knowing what your IP is at any given moment. You could call home and ask someone to check it, or check it yourself every morning before you leave work -- but thats not practical. The way I get around this problem is through a free service called No-IP. This may not be the best option, but it was the first one I found, its free, and easy to use. I haven't had any problems with it yet.
    http://www.no-ip.com/index.php
    Sign up, download their tiny server program, and register a free domain. The way this works is that the tiny server program runs in the background sending your current IP information to a free domain that you name. For example, you register TacticalGamer.hoptoit.org and download their server app. The tiny server now sends your IP information to tacticalgamer.hoptoit.org every so often, updating it as it changes. This way, no matter how your ISP changes your IP, you can always get access to it by going to tacticalgamer.hoptoit.org --- Now instead of typing your IP in somewhere, you would type tacticalgamer.hoptoit.org and that would translate into whatever your current IP is.

    You have now overcome the problem of dynamic IPs set by your ISP.

    Obstacle #2: Your Gateway (the router)

    This presents us with a few problems. Most people have their routers set to DHCP automatic, meaning your router gets all the information it needs from your ISP and that it automatically assigns an internal IP to every computer connected to your router. This creates a problem similar to the dynamic ISP IP because that automatic internal IP also changes. This is easily fixed.

    What you need to do here is set your computer to a specific fixed IP (static). Your router should have a range of values that it auto assigns so all you need to do is pick a value outside of this range. My lynksis, for example, uses all ips above 192.168.1.100 as automatic assignments. I've set my static IP to a value below that -- 192.168.1.85 for example.
    Once you set a static IP for your computer, it will not change.

    Setting the IP requires that you go to:
    Network connections >>
    Local Area Connections > Properties >>
    TCP/IP > Properties >>

    Now select the "Use the following IP Address" option, type in whatever static IP you wish your computer to use. Check the subnet mask and default gateway info on your router and bam. You now have a static internal IP.

    We're almost done! The last step involves port forwarding on your router. Remote Desktop (run: mstsc) uses port 3389. You need to go to your routers port forwarding settings and add the following: Port 3389 Forward to ##your new static IP that you selected##

    Now when you run mstsc (remote desktop) from another computer you access your own computer as follows:

    On any windows computer run: mstsc

    For the IP address, type in the name of the domain that you registered. In our example we used Tacticalgamer.hoptoit.org.

    This now attempts to connect to your current external ip address (the one your router shows to the world). Since it is using port 3389 and we set up port forwarding for 3389 to the computer that you assigned a static IP, this message goes straight to the computer you want.

    A log in screen appears for you and you type in your log on information....

    You are now using your home computer from abroad.



    -- Disclaimer -- I'm not really good with networking, this stuff I figured out with trial and error, those of you that know better correct me. I can answer questions on setting up a lynksis router, but please feel free to provide input for other manufacturers.

    A picture to help a bit.
    [media]http://aycu01.webshots.com/image/44080/2002930093224717144_rs.jpg[/media]
    Last edited by Switch; 02-19-2008, 12:52 AM.
    |TG|Switch

    Better known as:
    That noob who crashed the chopper.
    That noob who ran over the mine.
    That noob who TK'd me with a sniper rifle.
    That noob who hit that APC at 300m with light AT! Our APC...

  • #2
    Re: Remote Desktop Connection, Dynamic IP's, and You

    + 1 rep for helping folks out on a very misunderstood and kind of scary topic

    I don't ever use it though so a bunch of the services that Vista normally run I shut down to save resources from being used up.

    Switch, here is a great program for you to help you with wallpaper, if you are using dual monitor.

    DisplayFusion <--Link

    LINKS

    * *


    Stoop and you'll be stepped on; stand tall and you'll be shot at.

    -Carlos A. Urbizo-

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Remote Desktop Connection, Dynamic IP's, and You

      I'm bumping this since I was recently asked for help on this issue...
      |TG|Switch

      Better known as:
      That noob who crashed the chopper.
      That noob who ran over the mine.
      That noob who TK'd me with a sniper rifle.
      That noob who hit that APC at 300m with light AT! Our APC...

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Remote Desktop Connection, Dynamic IP's, and You

        I use TightVNC a lot to manage my PC here at home while I'm at work.

        All I had to do for it was set up a free account with dyndns.org, then make sure the proper ports were forwarded in my router. I set the TightVNC listen server to run at startup so whenever I send a request to connect, I know it will be handy.

        Easy as pie.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Remote Desktop Connection, Dynamic IP's, and You

          I tried adapting this so I can host SINS games, but it doesn't seemt to work.

          Is there some custom settings I need to input into the No-IP DUC program?
          |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
          TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
          Former 9th & 13th

          Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
          Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





          SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

          TG Primer and Rules

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Remote Desktop Connection, Dynamic IP's, and You

            What is your internet set up?
            Modem, Router, PC?
            |TG|Switch

            Better known as:
            That noob who crashed the chopper.
            That noob who ran over the mine.
            That noob who TK'd me with a sniper rifle.
            That noob who hit that APC at 300m with light AT! Our APC...

            Comment

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