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  • Gaming Issues

    Alright, I know that wireless Internet is basically the a gamers nightmare but why is it so bad exactly? Is it that the connection speed jumps all over the place every second or is it because it has a weak signal most of the time? I am going to be wiring my computer directly to my modem soon, but I'm not sure if this is going to help at all with lag and odd connection issues in games and just while chillin on my computer. Also what would be a good connection speed for game play for both wireless Internet and a modem hookup? My connection for wireless is mainly around 18, 24, and 36 Mbps. Sometimes (a lot more lately) the connection has gone down to 12 and 6. Rarely I get to 48, and once I even got to 54 for a couple of seconds. I really want to know if it is my connection that is making my gaming issues or if my computer just needs an upgrade. Also, the amount of free memory play an important role for games? The total amount of memory on my computer is 74.5 GB and I have 22.9 GB of space left. Is this a good amount or should I clean up more space on my computer?
    |TG| HolyEnd

  • #2
    Re: Gaming Issues

    First the easy question/answer: Normally I recomend at least 10 Gigs of free space to be safe. You could go lower if necessary, but normally I recommend at least 10 gigs free. So yes your 20 gigs should be good. Keep in mind Windows uses 1 to 2 gigs to supplement the system memory. However you can set your 'virtual memory' higher or lower as needed.

    Next question: Why does wireless = bad?

    Well the short answer is constant connection.

    When you are surfing the internet your PC is idle most of of the time. The Network traffic is rather low. Once the information is brought up it is stored on your PC. If you loose a key packet or some other piece of code there is plenty of time for the computer to go request the info be sent a second time. There is really no noticeable loss to performance other then waiting a few extra seconds (at most) for a page to load.

    Now in a game environment you have huge amounts of data being sent all at the same time. If you loose one or two packets the network can correct and still keep up, but if you are constantly loosing packets the program and the network will not be able to keep up and you will either 'skip' or just plain loose connection all together.

    Sorry If I make this example too simple, but I work retail; sometimes I have to try to explain how networks work to people who still don't know exactly how to turn a computer on...

    Think of it as trying to take notes during class. If teacher a writes a few lines then lets you copy them you are just surfing the net. If your pencil breaks (loose connection) you have time to sharpen it and still keep up, despite having to walk across the room to get to a sharpener.

    Now if your teacher writes on the board with his right hand and erases with his left as he goes (yes a real teacher of mine) then you are in an 'online game' If your pencil breaks you loose a lot of time and maybe a lot of information trying to run to sharpen you pencil. Now if you had an automatic pencil (wired connection) you can be up and running again quickly, just 'click'

    So long story short; Constant Connection is the primary reason for a wired network when gaming.

    As to speed: Most home high speeds are between 1.5 Mbs and 5 Mbs for cable. Your wireless router is running anywhere between 6 Mbs and 54 Mbs so the bottle neck for 'speed' is in the modem NOT the wireless.

    A good example for speed is ping. Wired I have about a 54ms (millisecond) ping to www.TacticalGamer.com, by brother down stairs has a wireless connection at 56ms. We both use the same internet connection, he just has a 2ms lag due to the wireless. 2ms is NOTHING so speed is not the issue.

    Now like I said my brother is wireless, he is also a supporting member of |TG| and hugely addicted to BF2142. I had to put high gain antennas on my router so he could play without constantly loosing connection. He has to have minimum of 4 out of 5 bars of signal strength or he drops like a gunship without a pilot at 20,000 ft...

    That said if you ever watch him play you will see "There is a problem with your connection" flashing on his screen once and a while. Yet he rarely drops fully out of the game. If his signal goes down to 3 out of 5 bars he drops out of the game almost every ten to twenty minutes.

    I hope all this helps in some way...

    ~ Draken

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Gaming Issues

      The main issue is usually how strong of a wireless connection you have between the wireless PC and the wireless router/modem (some modems have built-in routers).

      The strength of your connection may be reduced by a operating microwave between the PC and the router, cordless phones, and other 2.4 GHz devices. Also drywall, brickwalls, and internal house wiring may also have a impact on your connection. All of these factors combined can cause your somewhat strong wireless connection to drop and reconnect every so often.

      As for constant-on connections, you can usually have the card stay on and not go into "sleep" mode.


      Personally, all my PCs (and the one laptop) is on a wireless connection. My rig is (fortunately) in the same room as my router, so I get no noticable difference between having my PC on a wired 10/100 connection or a wireless one (54 mbps).
      |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
      TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
      Former 9th & 13th

      Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
      Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





      SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

      TG Primer and Rules

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Gaming Issues

        Also, the amount of free memory play an important role for games? The total amount of memory on my computer is 74.5 GB and I have 22.9 GB of space left. Is this a good amount or should I clean up more space on my computer?
        You're speaking of disk space, not memory.

        The defrag program needs about 15% free space to work effectively. Additionally, the fragmentation is mostly avoided in the first place (on NTFS) if you keep your free space to at least 20%. 22.9/74.5 is well above 20%, so you're ok.

        If you have a better defragger, it can keep related files together, which can make game maps load faster by not being spread out across the disk.
        Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

        snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

        Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Gaming Issues

          @DrakenViator
          Thanks for the help and info. ;)

          @Acreo Aeneas
          I do have a lot of cordless phones in the area between my computer and the router in my home office. I'm not really sure what the walls in my house are made out of but there is like 3 or so walls between my computer and the office modem.

          @ScratchMonkey
          Sorry to get disk space and memory mixed up. I really have no idea why I did it. :D
          My defragger is actually called Defraggler, made by the same company as CCleaner. If there is a better one than that then please let me know.

          Thanks everyone for responding to my post. :D

          Edit: I also wanted to ask if I hardwired my wireless computer to my modem, would it make my connection much better or would it just bit a little bit better?
          |TG| HolyEnd

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Gaming Issues

            If your PC is directly connected to your modem then all the bandwidth is available to you.

            Once you place a router in between, the bandwidth is split up amongst the various computers using the internet through the local network. So during peak usage when everyone on your network is all watching YouTube (or whatever), you're ping on a server will rise accordingly, whether or not you're on wired or wireless.
            |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
            TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
            Former 9th & 13th

            Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
            Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





            SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

            TG Primer and Rules

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Gaming Issues

              Oh, okay. Thanks for the info Acreo Aeneas. :)
              |TG| HolyEnd

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Gaming Issues

                Note that a gaming router lets your game packets (and others deemed "high priority", like VOIP) "cut the line" and go out before web, email, and P2P packets.
                Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Gaming Issues

                  Originally posted by ScratchMonkey View Post
                  Note that a gaming router lets your game packets (and others deemed "high priority", like VOIP) "cut the line" and go out before web, email, and P2P packets.
                  Also Note: Not all gaming packets get this prioritization. Some game-related packets might not be recognized by the router.
                  |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
                  TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
                  Former 9th & 13th

                  Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
                  Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





                  SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

                  TG Primer and Rules

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Gaming Issues

                    As a rule of thumb, if you give all UDP packets high priority, you cover all the common cases. UDP is used for most games, and also for VOIP and DNS.

                    TCP tends to be used for stuff where you need guaranteed delivery but you can afford for it to arrive late. UDP is used when you can afford to drop packets but they need to arrive on time.
                    Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                    snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                    Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                    Comment

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