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  • #16
    Re: Hard drive fails to boot

    Is Linux hard to install? Is linux free?

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    • #17
      Re: Hard drive fails to boot

      Last time I installed CentOS 5, it went on smooth as glass using an old HP Vectra. I now use it as a utility backup box, plugging in USB external drives as needed. The only hitch was that the box had so little memory (128 MB I think) that the installer would not allow a GUI setup. But I was fine with a command prompt only. (I only talk to it over an ssh connection anyway.) It kinda surprised me that Linux had gotten fat enough not to run in 128 MB. (The embedded versions can run in much less memory.)

      Most people who are using Linux for a desktop go with Ubuntu. I'm using CentOS because I'm using it for servers, and CentOS has a very long support period for a given version, which is what you want for a server OS that doesn't get upgraded frequently.

      Oh, and yes, Linux is free. But if you insist, support groups will take your money. ;)

      http://www.ubuntu.com/
      http://centos.org/

      I used to run Fedora, but you have to love to update every 6 months, as that's its support cycle. That was way too frequent for me.
      Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

      snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

      Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

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      • #18
        Re: Hard drive fails to boot

        Originally posted by TG_Blood View Post
        Is Linux hard to install? Is linux free?
        Originally posted by ScratchMonkey View Post
        Last time I installed CentOS 5, it went on smooth as glass using an old HP Vectra. I now use it as a utility backup box, plugging in USB external drives as needed. The only hitch was that the box had so little memory (128 MB I think) that the installer would not allow a GUI setup. But I was fine with a command prompt only. (I only talk to it over an ssh connection anyway.) It kinda surprised me that Linux had gotten fat enough not to run in 128 MB. (The embedded versions can run in much less memory.)

        Most people who are using Linux for a desktop go with Ubuntu. I'm using CentOS because I'm using it for servers, and CentOS has a very long support period for a given version, which is what you want for a server OS that doesn't get upgraded frequently.

        Oh, and yes, Linux is free. But if you insist, support groups will take your money. ;)

        http://www.ubuntu.com/
        http://centos.org/

        I used to run Fedora, but you have to love to update every 6 months, as that's its support cycle. That was way too frequent for me.
        What Scratch said. :)

        The few Linux distros I've used were mostly easily to install. Some required me to hunt around for days for drivers and others didn't need me to do much of anything.

        From the sounds of it, Ubuntu is probably the easiest to work with. A more detailed GUI and drivers that install automatically. Should make one of my recycled builds better.
        |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
        TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
        Former 9th & 13th

        Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
        Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





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