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The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

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  • The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

    This might help some of you who haven't tried out Linux before take the step. Not so much for your gaming rig, but maybe on an old compute that is showing it's age.

    The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

    Have fun!

    LINKS

    * *


    Stoop and you'll be stepped on; stand tall and you'll be shot at.

    -Carlos A. Urbizo-


  • #2
    Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

    I'm really trying to warm up to linux. It runs my netbook terrifically, but I just don't have much use for it on my desktop. Maybe if Valve would ever get around to making Steam run on Linux I'd have a reason.


    TG-18th 18th SF Operational Detachment Delta

    If you're playing the game, be in the correct TeamSpeak Channel.

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    • #3
      Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

      Step One: Burn Ubuntu Live CD
      Step Two: Put CD in computer and turn on computer.
      Step Three: Click try Ubuntu without install
      Step Four:????
      Step Five: Profit


      Comment


      • #4
        Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

        Ubuntu's pretty decent. I have it running on a old junker upstairs which also acts as a file server. I even put WINE on there and have no troubles running most of the Windows apps I tried (FileZilla, Notepad++, Starcraft, etc.).

        The only thing I don't like is that it doesn't come loaded with the packages needed to play back non-open media formats (like movie DVDs, etc.). It's also about as resource hungry as Windows XP.
        |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
        TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
        Former 9th & 13th

        Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
        Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





        SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

        TG Primer and Rules

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        • #5
          Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

          The only machines I've been able to spare in the past, are laptops and my netbook. Every single time, for one reason or another, I was never able to get the wireless to work. Which is a deal-breaker.

          In 2007, about a year before I finally got back into FPS/RPG gaming (I quit PC games after I canceled my WoW account for about a year and a half or so) I was able to run Fedora as my main desktop for about 3 months, before I finally needed to reload and go back to Windows. Mostly for the games, partly for my new job. Wine helped delay my return to Windows.

          I would be using Ubuntu or Fedora on my Acer, except for the wireless issue. There are troubleshooting steps out there, but most of them are not in "Linux 101 For Dummies" format, or "haha n00b just ndiswrapper it LOLZ!!111" and I just don't have the ambition to dive in, as I spend enough time wrestling Windows machines and servers into submission for a living.
          "But way back where I come from, we never mean to bother. We don't like to make our passions other peoples' concern." -Dar Williams
          Former Captain of the 55th Infantry Division

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          • #6
            Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

            Originally posted by Spulat View Post
            The only machines I've been able to spare in the past, are laptops and my netbook. Every single time, for one reason or another, I was never able to get the wireless to work. Which is a deal-breaker.:row__738:

            I would be using Ubuntu or Fedora on my Acer, except for the wireless issue. There are troubleshooting steps out there, but most of them are not in "Linux 101 For Dummies" format, or "haha n00b just ndiswrapper it LOLZ!!111" and I just don't have the ambition to dive in, as I spend enough time wrestling Windows machines and servers into submission for a living.
            I am in the exact same boat.
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            • #7
              Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

              It's interesting that the deal-breakers are the proprietary stuff that uses secrecy to tie you to those vendors. Wireless, video cards, and DRM-based codecs all screw us over by using closed "standards" that only rich media companies can break through.

              There's some noise in the Obama camp that there might be some backing for open source and open standards there (perhaps as part of the call for transparency), and Europeans seem to be going that way as well.
              Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

              snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

              Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

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              • #8
                Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

                Originally posted by ScratchMonkey View Post
                It's interesting that the deal-breakers are the proprietary stuff that uses secrecy to tie you to those vendors. Wireless, video cards, and DRM-based codecs all screw us over by using closed "standards" that only rich media companies can break through.

                There's some noise in the Obama camp that there might be some backing for open source and open standards there (perhaps as part of the call for transparency), and Europeans seem to be going that way as well.
                I think it ties into the whole "developing America's infrastructure" thing he's got going. He's mentioned bringing tech up to date a number of times.

                Now as I remember, I HAVE run Ubuntu under a VM before... but then running it in a sandbox almost feels like I'm defeating the purpose of having it in the first place; it isn't running full speed, and dual booting with Vista/7 is a nightmare and something NO ONE should do without the proper research.
                "But way back where I come from, we never mean to bother. We don't like to make our passions other peoples' concern." -Dar Williams
                Former Captain of the 55th Infantry Division

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

                  Originally posted by Spulat View Post
                  The only machines I've been able to spare in the past, are laptops and my netbook. Every single time, for one reason or another, I was never able to get the wireless to work. Which is a deal-breaker.

                  In 2007, about a year before I finally got back into FPS/RPG gaming (I quit PC games after I canceled my WoW account for about a year and a half or so) I was able to run Fedora as my main desktop for about 3 months, before I finally needed to reload and go back to Windows. Mostly for the games, partly for my new job. Wine helped delay my return to Windows.

                  I would be using Ubuntu or Fedora on my Acer, except for the wireless issue. There are troubleshooting steps out there, but most of them are not in "Linux 101 For Dummies" format, or "haha n00b just ndiswrapper it LOLZ!!111" and I just don't have the ambition to dive in, as I spend enough time wrestling Windows machines and servers into submission for a living.
                  The madwifi driver works really well on the Aspire One. I have it on my brother's and it runs great. The only real problem I've run into is that you need to rebuild it after a kernel update.
                  sigpic

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                  • #10
                    Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

                    Just posted a few mins. ago:

                    Desktop Linux: Ready for the mainstream

                    Don't completely agree, but has some good points.

                    LINKS

                    * *


                    Stoop and you'll be stepped on; stand tall and you'll be shot at.

                    -Carlos A. Urbizo-

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

                      Moreover, Linux-based shops would require significantly less training than they would to teach staff Vista or Windows 7 and Microsoft Office 2007.
                      Does it?
                      |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
                      TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
                      Former 9th & 13th

                      Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
                      Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





                      SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

                      TG Primer and Rules

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                      • #12
                        Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

                        They updated to part 2

                        The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 2: Installation


                        .

                        LINKS

                        * *


                        Stoop and you'll be stepped on; stand tall and you'll be shot at.

                        -Carlos A. Urbizo-

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

                          Inspired by a rep comment (thanks, EGG!) I found a couple of pages in which a filthy capitalist embraces open source and open standards:

                          http://news.cnet.com/2010-1071-995823.html
                          http://blogs.sun.com/ontherecord/ent...en_source_open
                          Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                          snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                          Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

                            Originally posted by ScratchMonkey View Post
                            Inspired by a rep comment (thanks, EGG!) I found a couple of pages in which a filthy capitalist embraces open source and open standards:

                            http://news.cnet.com/2010-1071-995823.html
                            http://blogs.sun.com/ontherecord/ent...en_source_open
                            Ahem. We're all capitalists here my friend. Which one of us is to blame for this embracement of open source and open standards? /sarcasm ends
                            |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
                            TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
                            Former 9th & 13th

                            Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
                            Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





                            SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

                            TG Primer and Rules

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: The Beginner's Guide to Linux, Part 1: Finding the Right Distribution

                              Originally posted by Spyder228 View Post
                              I'm really trying to warm up to linux. It runs my netbook terrifically, but I just don't have much use for it on my desktop. Maybe if Valve would ever get around to making Steam run on Linux I'd have a reason.
                              Oh hai, I herd dere wuz dis bunchez of libraries dat wuz implementation of Windows within Unix, effectively an emulator but without it being slow and an emulator

                              CS:S, and HL2 are both in the "Platinum" category, meaning they run perfectly, even better than Windows in some cases.

                              Steam still isn't perfect, although it is in the "Silver" category, meaning there are some features that do not work, and may require some configuration.

                              If you want to just play with it casually, it probably isn't for you, but there are people out there that are making good progress towards making a perfect implementation of Windows on Unix a reality. There are multiple popular Windows programs that run perfectly with WINE, such as Microsoft Office, many games (Souce-run games, COD4, Guild Wars, WoW), and some small apps (I use 7-Zip under WINE to extract .rar files)


                              I use Linux every day, even now as I type this. I know the average person that comes to Tactical Gamer is probably going to demand more from their operating system, and Linux isn't quite ready for the mainstream market. For casual users, it works perfectly. My friend's grandmother in Mexico uses Ubuntu without issue. I got my friend down the street running OpenSuSE 11.0 on his computer (which I built for him :D I didn't want him to waste money on a pre-built computer), although he does run Windows XP within VirtualBox, an emulator (iTunes... damn you...). Linux isn't difficult really, you don't have to know at all how to use a Command-Line Interface (all text), although it certainly is useful.

                              I reccomend OpenSuSE 11.0 because it is a perfect combination of a strong community (sponsored and supported by Novell even. It is considered the open-source version of SuSE Enterprise, a commercial Linux distro), beautiful security, flexibility, and features. Ubuntu, while lacking some flexibility and security (no root password unless you change it..), has a very, very strong community, regular releases, and a very, very large community.


                              Oh, right, driver issues are also a very big problem for many people. I haven't had a problem before, but every now and then people will have a strange setup (usually when they install on a pre-built computer. I despise pre-builds...) and will have a problem with networking or graphics or printing. Ubuntu and OpenSuSE are usually credited with having the strongest driver support in Linux. If the driver doesn't come with the distribution, you can likely find it online. If you can't find it online, then you might have to do some dirty under-the-hood work.
                              Waldo II

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