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  • Computer vulnerabilities

    Three CERT alerts in my mailbox today:

    Microsoft PowerPoint Multiple Vulnerabilities
    http://www.us-cert.gov/cas/techalerts/TA09-132A.html

    Apple Updates for Multiple Vulnerabilities
    http://www.us-cert.gov/cas/techalerts/TA09-133A.html

    Adobe Reader and Acrobat JavaScript Vulnerabilities
    http://www.us-cert.gov/cas/techalerts/TA09-133B.html

    Note that the Acrobat vulnerability affects all platforms, so you're not safe just because you don't use Windows.

    I highly recommend subscribing to CERT alerts. It's very low volume. (About 15 alerts in the last 5 months.) Set up a mail filter in your mail program to send them to their own folder so they don't end up lost in your Inbox. In their own folder, you can quickly spot that a new alert is available and take quick action to download a patch or mitigate your vulnerability.

    Sign up here:

    http://www.us-cert.gov/cas/alldocs.html
    Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

    snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

    Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

  • #2
    Re: Computer vulnerabilities

    Originally posted by ScratchMonkey View Post
    It's very low volume. (About 15 alerts in the last 5 months.)
    :) That is pretty low volume. Going to sign up for it now. :icon14:
    |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
    TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
    Former 9th & 13th

    Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
    Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





    SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

    TG Primer and Rules

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Computer vulnerabilities

      Microsoft Video ActiveX Control Vulnerability
      http://www.us-cert.gov/cas/techalerts/TA09-187A.html
      http://www.microsoft.com/technet/sec...ry/972890.mspx
      http://www.kb.cert.org/vuls/id/180513

      Microsoft Windows comes with an ActiveX component called "ActiveX control for streaming video," which is provided by msvidctl.dll. This component provides a number of Class Identifiers (CLSIDs) that are marked as Safe for Scripting and Safe for Initialization, which means that they can be used by Internet Explorer. The ActiveX controls provided by msvidctl.dll fail to properly handle file input, which can result in stack memory corruption. This can allow the Structured Exception Handler (SEH) to be overwritten, thus allowing subversion of the program execution flow.
      There is no fix. The suggested solutions are to disable 45 controls in this DLL or disable all of ActiveX.

      Here's Information Week's coverage, posted an hour ago:

      http://www.informationweek.com/news/...leID=218400787

      "A browse-and-get-owned attack vector exists," acknowledged Microsoft security engineer Chengyun Chu on the company's Security Research & Defense blog. "A user needs to be lured to navigate to a malicious Web site or a compromised legitimate Web site to be affected. No further user interaction is needed."

      And legitimate Web sites may be compromised merely by hosting content submitted by users. Such content or advertisements could be crafted to exploit the Video ActiveX Control vulnerability.

      Chu notes that Outlook Express and Outlook will open HTML e-mail messages in the Restricted sites zone by default. This prevents ActiveX controls from being used when reading those messages. However, clicking on a link in such a message could still initiate a browser-based attack.
      Note that advertisements can host the hostile content. Yet another reason to use some kind of ad-blocker. I'm wondering how well Apophis trusts his advertisers?
      Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

      snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

      Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Computer vulnerabilities

        Interesting stuff
        "But way back where I come from, we never mean to bother. We don't like to make our passions other peoples' concern." -Dar Williams
        Former Captain of the 55th Infantry Division

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Computer vulnerabilities

          Thanks for posting Scratch. Nice discussion and plenty of links here.

          DB

          «That looks like a really nice house except for that horrible bathroom.» Donrhos

          | |





          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Computer vulnerabilities

            Remember to check up-thread for subscription information for the very-low-traffic CERT alerts. Anyone supporting computers (for any OS) should be subscribed.
            Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

            snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

            Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Computer vulnerabilities

              Microsoft knew about this months ago, and crackers have already been spreading malicious code with it for a month now. The earliest that any patch might be available is the 14th, if MS puts effort into it.

              http://news.idg.no/cw/art.cfm?id=56A...CE0CF546FB3CFA
              Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

              snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

              Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Computer vulnerabilities

                Breaking news:

                Firefox 3.5 Vulnerable to Critical Javascript Attack
                http://www.pcworld.com/article/16839...pt_attack.html

                If you're using 3.5, here's a temporary fix. (3.0 isn't vulnerable.)
                http://voices.washingtonpost.com/sec...ss=securityfix

                FF added new JS features in 3.5, and you need to disable the "just-in-time" compiler. In the URL box, enter "about:config" to view the special FF settings. Find the setting "javascript.options.jit.content" and change it from true to false to turn off JIT until an official fix is available.
                Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Computer vulnerabilities

                  More on the earlier Microsoft advisory:

                  http://blogs.technet.com/msrc/archiv...-released.aspx
                  Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                  snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                  Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Computer vulnerabilities

                    http://www.us-cert.gov/cas/techalerts/TA09-204A.html

                    Adobe Security Advisory APSA09-03 describes a vulnerability affecting the Adobe Flash player. Flash player version 10.0.22.87 and earlier 10.x versions as well as Flash player version 9.0.159.0 and earlier 9.x versions are affected.

                    An attacker could exploit this vulnerability by convincing a user to visit a website that hosts a specially crafted SWF file. The Adobe Flash browser plugin is available for multiple web browsers and operating systems, any of which could be affected. An attacker could also create a PDF document that has an embedded SWF file to exploit the vulnerability.

                    This vulnerability is being actively exploited.
                    Be very careful playing video on the web. Don't open Acrobat files from strangers.
                    Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                    snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                    Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Computer vulnerabilities

                      Adobe promises patch by Friday:

                      http://www.theregister.co.uk/2009/07...tch_pre_alert/
                      Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                      snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                      Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Computer vulnerabilities

                        http://www.us-cert.gov/cas/techalerts/TA09-209A.html

                        Microsoft found a typo in Active Template Library (ATL), a framework used by many companies like Adobe and Cisco to write their applications. This typo is responsible for the earlier vulnerability in the MS web video player system. So both end users and developers need to look at this one! If you program using ATL, you may be shipping vulnerabilities to your customers.
                        Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                        snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                        Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Computer vulnerabilities

                          This one's kind of scary:

                          https://www.isc.org/node/474

                          This doesn't affect end users, but it does affect anyone running the BIND DNS server as a zone master. I expect a lot of hosting services are gonna get hammered by this one. You may see a lot of sites go unreachable over the next week as BIND servers shut down unexpectedly.
                          Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                          snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                          Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Computer vulnerabilities

                            Couple of patches today, one rated "critical":

                            http://www.computerworld.com/s/artic...barrel_patches

                            The issue is that someone can email you a malicious Office file that tricks the underlying Visual Basic machinery into downloading and running evil code and taking over your machine.
                            Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                            snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                            Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Computer vulnerabilities

                              IBM Gifts Computer Security Expo Attendees With Virus-Filled USB Sticks
                              http://gizmodo.com/5544593/ibm-gifts...led-usb-sticks
                              http://www.theage.com.au/technology/...0521-w1gv.html

                              Original source:
                              http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sec...0521-w1gv.html

                              "At the AusCERT conference this week, you may have collected a complimentary USB key from the IBM booth," Wightwick wrote.

                              "Unfortunately we have discovered that some of these USB keys contained malware and we suspect that all USB keys may be affected."

                              Wightwick said the virus spreads when the infected USB device is inserted into a Windows computer but noted it should be detected by the majority of current anti-virus products.
                              Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                              snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                              Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                              Comment

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