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  • OS question

    So I have all the major components at home in the man-cave awaiting my triumphant return, but I still need to get the OS.

    It's going to be Vista, because I am too old and lazy to learn a new one, but I don't know whether to get the 32- or 64-bit version (it'll be OEM either way).

    The system is going to be a i7 2.66GHz with 6GB RAM and a graphics card with a 4870 and 1GB. It will primarily be a gaming machine.

    So is 64-bit supported enough to be worth it, or should I stick with 32-bit?

    Thanks!


    "Oratio Ultima Regem -- The Last Argument of Kings"


  • #2
    Re: OS question

    I have Vista Basic 64-bit, and I've had almost no problems. Just make sure your components are 64-bit compatible. Most software will work anyway.
    |TG| 16note



    Steam: 16note, Xbox Live: thefifthbeetle

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    • #3
      Re: OS question

      Well with Win7 right around the corner I would look at using the Win7 RC and getting used to that because any version of vista you buy gets a free upgrade to Win7. But as to the 32 vs 64 bit question, 64-bit all the way.
      Reapator, overlord of ponies

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      • #4
        Re: OS question

        As mentioned....

        -No reason to stick with 32 bit. Unless you want to take about 3.5GB of the RAM you have, back, because it won't be of any use then.

        -Don't bother with Vista unless you have the free upgrade path to Windows 7, which will be released in 3 months. Don't spend any more money than you need to, on an OS.
        "But way back where I come from, we never mean to bother. We don't like to make our passions other peoples' concern." -Dar Williams
        Former Captain of the 55th Infantry Division

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        • #5
          Re: OS question

          If you're going to buy Vista right now, just save that money and buy the final version of Win 7 come October. Until then just use Win 7 RC, 64bit of course.

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          • #6
            Re: OS question

            Use the Windows 7 Release Candidate until the full version comes out. Do not use the 32 bit version, especially if you want to actually use that 6GB of RAM. The most total system RAM (including video cards, hard drive cache, sound cards, etc.) a 32 bit OS can use is 4GB.
            sigpic

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            • #7
              Re: OS question

              Thanks guys! Good point on the memory limitation. I've never been good at bit calculations.

              My next question is I have an OEM SATA II drive. I already have rails and screws, and I know I need to get a SATA II cable. Is there anything else I need to procure to install the drive?

              Thanks!


              "Oratio Ultima Regem -- The Last Argument of Kings"

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              • #8
                Re: OS question

                Originally posted by EvilTodd View Post
                Thanks guys! Good point on the memory limitation. I've never been good at bit calculations.

                My next question is I have an OEM SATA II drive. I already have rails and screws, and I know I need to get a SATA II cable. Is there anything else I need to procure to install the drive?

                Thanks!
                Make sure you have a spare SATA connector from your PSU - no reason you shouldn't. PSU Other than that, plug those two cables in and you're good to go.

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                • #9
                  Re: OS question

                  Your motherboard may come with spare sata cables.

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                  • #10
                    Re: OS question

                    Consider getting an external USB2 drive to put all your personal data on. That way when you need to reformat to upgrade, it's easy to move everything over. All my games that don't hook deep into Windows go into G:\Games on my USB2 drive, along with all my other work.

                    And don't install any program to "Program Files" that needs to write to its own directory. (Most older programs try to do that, assuming it's a single-user system and they can scribble anywhere.) You'll get constant nags from newer more-secure Windows from that. Put those programs in a separate top-level directory like OldPrograms. (I don't like spaces in directory and file names, so I use CamelCase.)
                    Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                    snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                    Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

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                    • #11
                      Re: OS question

                      Originally posted by ScratchMonkey View Post
                      Consider getting an external USB2 drive to put all your personal data on. That way when you need to reformat to upgrade, it's easy to move everything over. All my games that don't hook deep into Windows go into G:\Games on my USB2 drive, along with all my other work.
                      Or an e-sata external and it's just as fast as though it was internal. I can't think of any modern motherboard that doesn't have e-sata on the back. And most e-sata external casings also have USB so it'll work with laptops as well. I dread everytime I have to use my external on my laptop with the slow USB speed. Only problem with e-sata though is that it must be plugged in on boot or the BIOS doesn't detect it(poo this in this plug-and-play age). But if you forget to plug it in on boot, just use the USB cable.

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                      • #12
                        Re: OS question

                        Originally posted by blibblob View Post
                        Or an e-sata external and it's just as fast as though it was internal. I can't think of any modern motherboard that doesn't have e-sata on the back. And most e-sata external casings also have USB so it'll work with laptops as well. I dread everytime I have to use my external on my laptop with the slow USB speed. Only problem with e-sata though is that it must be plugged in on boot or the BIOS doesn't detect it(poo this in this plug-and-play age). But if you forget to plug it in on boot, just use the USB cable.
                        You'd have to buy a mid-range to high-end board to find eSATA ports on the I/O back panel. Even then, some might not include a eSATA port on the back and thus you'd need one of those eSATA expansion slot adapters plugged into a free SATA header. (My ASUS P5Q is an example.)

                        If you're going the route of a external HDD, get a 7,200 RPM drive instead of one of those small 2.5" 5,400 drives (which only has a USB port). Then you'd at least be able to get one with eSATA and/or Firewire (and USB) and still get 40-60 MBs of read/write performance instead of half that.
                        |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
                        TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
                        Former 9th & 13th

                        Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
                        Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





                        SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

                        TG Primer and Rules

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                        • #13
                          Re: OS question

                          Yes 64 bit all the way because of the memory limitation. Any hardware or software that has compatibility issues will typically have a patch for it of some sore. I have been running Vista 64 for many months now and I haven't had any issues to speak of.
                          "The mind stretched to a new concept can never return to it's orginal dimension."
                          "What the mind can conceive and believe..... it can achieve."

                          The Mediator






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                          • #14
                            Re: OS question

                            Any current software or hardware will have a patch. Older stuff probably won't. If it's closed source and the company is gone, how could there be?

                            I don't want to scare you away, but any OS upgrade is going to have these risks. Beware of all closed source programs for that reason.
                            Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                            snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                            Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

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                            • #15
                              Re: OS question

                              Originally posted by Acreo Aeneas View Post
                              You'd have to buy a mid-range to high-end board to find eSATA ports on the I/O back panel. Even then, some might not include a eSATA port on the back and thus you'd need one of those eSATA expansion slot adapters plugged into a free SATA header. (My ASUS P5Q is an example.)

                              If you're going the route of a external HDD, get a 7,200 RPM drive instead of one of those small 2.5" 5,400 drives (which only has a USB port). Then you'd at least be able to get one with eSATA and/or Firewire (and USB) and still get 40-60 MBs of read/write performance instead of half that.
                              If it's an i7 board they're all high end since the chipset is so damn expensive. eSATA ports aren't really rare, it's just rare that people use them, like spdif out. Though quick glance showed if you get the absolute cheapest boards it's not on there, bad idea to get those though. And my external casing came with a SATA to eSATA cable slot. And priced together with my hard drive was only $15 more expensive than one of the brand name externals put together for you. They also sell externals with eSATA ports. Well worth the slight cost.

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