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How well would this build stack up against some of the newer games?

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  • How well would this build stack up against some of the newer games?

    Ordering a new laptop, and I checked out some benchmarks, but I would rather hear some personal feed back.

    What do you think about:
    -2x CROSSFIRE Ati 3870 512mb (1024mb)
    -Intel T9600 45nm "Montevina" Core2 Duo 2.8GHz w/6MB L2 On-die cache - 1066MHz FSB 35 watt
    - Kingston 4,096MB (2 SODIMMS) DDR3 1066MHz Dual Channel Memory
    - 250GB 7200RPM Seagate (Serial-ATA II 3GB/s)
    - Full Size Black Aluminum Notebook Cooler - Dual Fans - USB Powered (For up to 17" Laptops)


    Hadouken!!! (>*.*)> ==> ==> ==> ^(X.X)^



  • #2
    Re: How well would this build stack up against some of the newer games?

    That should be okay. Just don't expect to be able to run some of the more demanding titles at full settings.
    |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
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    • #3
      Re: How well would this build stack up against some of the newer games?

      Some of it is sort of impressive. The ram is good and CPU is decent for a mobile, but I am kind of confused about the choice of Gfx. card. There was a big jump in performance between the 3*** series and 4*** series of ATI cards, but this is in crossfire, so in games that perform well in crossfire, it should perform around the level of a 4*** single gpu.

      What price are you seeing this at, and is it at a local shop or online.

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      • #4
        Re: How well would this build stack up against some of the newer games?

        what is the screen resolution? can it hold a 2nd hdd? are you getting a BR DVD drive? what is the price?

        I had a dell 1720 with lesser specs than that and I was playing any game I put in it....

        the resolution of the screen will be the biggest issue. trying to drive a 920x1200 screen is way harder than 1280x800, but the real estate on the wuxga lcd is worth needing to turn down the resolution in game if you have to and getting a little fuzzy.
        Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former. -Albert Einstein
        The two most common elements in the universe are Hydrogen and stupidity. -Harlan Ellison

        If all else fails: "rm -rf /"

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        • #5
          Re: How well would this build stack up against some of the newer games?

          A couple of comments:

          -Dual Core is quickly going the way of NetBurst if you're planning on handling any data intensive work. Notebook CPUs are about 75% as effective clock for clock as a desktop model with similar performance specs due to optimizations to reduce power that the engineers must implement. So that 2.8 ghz dual is more equivalent to a Wolfdale clocked down to 2.1ghz desktop CPU

          -Quite frankly the HD3xxx series is garbage, they are neither up to par on graphical output when compared to the 8xxx series of nVidia cards. On top of that, ATi has significant driver and cooling issues which you will have to be mindful of. If you're buying a laptop your manufacturer will be providing driver support, and if my Sony with an HD 3470 is any indication, manufacturer support is pretty crappy. The 3470 suffers from driver instability, horrible driver heat management, and to top it off the 34xx series chips are extremely vulnerable to damage if the silicon is pushed even marginally close to its heat envelope. Another downplayed flaw with the chip design is that this series CANNOT handle blowing up images very well, at all; if you get this laptop, expect to throw away any hopes of getting greeat anti-aliasing levels as this is where these cards DIE. They simply cannot do it for reasons unbeknownst to me.

          Okay, rant against ATi aside, I do have a HD4850 in my desktop and it performs marvelously, so if you can it would be better to get one of the 48xx series cards if they're available yet as Crossfire support is a mixed bag, and optimizations which might correct the deficiencies of the HD3xxx architecture (Remember the nVidia FX anyone?) are also nonexistent.

          DDR3 is a significant step up from DDR2 in terms of power consumption and heat generation (die shrink from 130nm to 90nm, or something like that), however aisde from that don't expect a great jump in performance if you're coming from a DDR2 box as the top end of DDR2 runs at 1066mhz as well. Kingston is a bullet-proof brand, and I have yet to see a stick of their merchandise fail in over 7 years of buying from them; generally there is a price premium attached to their stuff for a reason...

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          • #6
            Re: How well would this build stack up against some of the newer games?

            Originally posted by CableGuy10 View Post
            Notebook CPUs are about 75% as effective clock for clock as a desktop model with similar performance specs due to optimizations to reduce power that the engineers must implement.
            please provide proof... I was under the impression that laptop and desktop chips were now the same thing... (a t7200 in a desktop is identical to the laptop t7200 - other than the heat spreader possibly)

            Originally posted by CableGuy10 View Post
            -ATi has significant driver and cooling issues which you will have to be mindful of.
            what source are you quoting? I love my 4870... and using the latest omega driver on a laptop will remove any "driver issues" that may be present in old, rarely updates video drivers from oem's. I have never had driver issues from any of my radeon products...
            Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former. -Albert Einstein
            The two most common elements in the universe are Hydrogen and stupidity. -Harlan Ellison

            If all else fails: "rm -rf /"

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: How well would this build stack up against some of the newer games?

              Originally posted by CableGuy10 View Post
              A couple of comments:

              -Dual Core is quickly going the way of NetBurst if you're planning on handling any data intensive work. Notebook CPUs are about 75% as effective clock for clock as a desktop model with similar performance specs due to optimizations to reduce power that the engineers must implement. So that 2.8 ghz dual is more equivalent to a Wolfdale clocked down to 2.1ghz desktop CPU

              -Quite frankly the HD3xxx series is garbage, they are neither up to par on graphical output when compared to the 8xxx series of nVidia cards. On top of that, ATi has significant driver and cooling issues which you will have to be mindful of. If you're buying a laptop your manufacturer will be providing driver support, and if my Sony with an HD 3470 is any indication, manufacturer support is pretty crappy. The 3470 suffers from driver instability, horrible driver heat management, and to top it off the 34xx series chips are extremely vulnerable to damage if the silicon is pushed even marginally close to its heat envelope. Another downplayed flaw with the chip design is that this series CANNOT handle blowing up images very well, at all; if you get this laptop, expect to throw away any hopes of getting greeat anti-aliasing levels as this is where these cards DIE. They simply cannot do it for reasons unbeknownst to me.

              Okay, rant against ATi aside, I do have a HD4850 in my desktop and it performs marvelously, so if you can it would be better to get one of the 48xx series cards if they're available yet as Crossfire support is a mixed bag, and optimizations which might correct the deficiencies of the HD3xxx architecture (Remember the nVidia FX anyone?) are also nonexistent.

              DDR3 is a significant step up from DDR2 in terms of power consumption and heat generation (die shrink from 130nm to 90nm, or something like that), however aisde from that don't expect a great jump in performance if you're coming from a DDR2 box as the top end of DDR2 runs at 1066mhz as well. Kingston is a bullet-proof brand, and I have yet to see a stick of their merchandise fail in over 7 years of buying from them; generally there is a price premium attached to their stuff for a reason...
              From the comments earlier, and some of my own research, I haven't quite heard anything like driver instabilities and such. I do remember reading up that the originals weren't the greatest but most of the issues were corrected in releases afterwards. Nor have I heard any significant heat issues that seem as exaggerated by your claims.

              Originally posted by =DdogG= View Post
              what is the screen resolution? can it hold a 2nd hdd? are you getting a BR DVD drive? what is the price?

              I had a dell 1720 with lesser specs than that and I was playing any game I put in it....

              the resolution of the screen will be the biggest issue. trying to drive a 920x1200 screen is way harder than 1280x800, but the real estate on the wuxga lcd is worth needing to turn down the resolution in game if you have to and getting a little fuzzy.
              Display" 17" "WUXGA" Super Clear Ultra Bright Glossy Screen, I doubt I'll be running it at 1920x1200 though.


              Hadouken!!! (>*.*)> ==> ==> ==> ^(X.X)^


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              • #8
                Re: How well would this build stack up against some of the newer games?

                Originally posted by =DdogG= View Post
                please provide proof... I was under the impression that laptop and desktop chips were now the same thing... (a t7200 in a desktop is identical to the laptop t7200 - other than the heat spreader possibly)
                A T7200 in a desktop is identical to a T7200 in a laptop. But why would you put a mobile chip in a desktop? The mobile Core 2 Duos start with a T while the desktop versions start with an E; although I don't know if the T7200 is supposed to be the mobile equivalent of an E7200.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: How well would this build stack up against some of the newer games?

                  Originally posted by =DdogG= View Post
                  please provide proof... I was under the impression that laptop and desktop chips were now the same thing... (a t7200 in a desktop is identical to the laptop t7200 - other than the heat spreader possibly)



                  what source are you quoting? I love my 4870... and using the latest omega driver on a laptop will remove any "driver issues" that may be present in old, rarely updates video drivers from oem's. I have never had driver issues from any of my radeon products...
                  1. Nothing could be further from the truth, the E8400, P8400, and T8300 share nothing in common save for the basic design of the architecture. The E8400 is clocked on paper at 3.0ghz, with a 65W TDP, packaged in LGA775 (Socket T) and has 6mb of L2 cache. The P8400 is clocked at 2.26ghz, with 3mb of cache active, in socket P, which is a different pin layout and number...and 25W TDP. Then there is the T8300 which is clocked at 2.4ghz with 6mb of L2 Cache, and also packaged for socket P with a TDP value of 35W...and thats not even getting into the discussion of the performance-per-clock variations based on the application as the T and P series processors will not stack up as well against the E series, with all things being equal.

                  2. I'm quoting my own computers, the omega drivers are nice but they're definitely a roll-of-the-dice, and are not legal drivers for your OEM laptop; so if you are using them and the computer dies, thats your fault. I have a Mobile Radeon HD 3470 in my laptop and it has chronic heating issues, including crashes and BSODs due to overheating the RV620 silicon. I have one of the highest-end HD4850s, and it suffered (along with the 4600 series, look this up if you don't believe me) from faulty fan control programming where the fan control subroutine in the drivers did not adequately cool the GPU. This was especially problematic with overclockers trying to tweak the 4800 series, and caused no end of headaches for 4670 users as they had to manually set the fan speeds to prevent overheat. The saving grace for ATi on the 4800 series is that the GPU has a max temperature rating of something like 134 deg. Celsius (rough guestimate, I know its over 100 C) which prevented this issue from killing all of their sales until the driver problems could be corrected. I know that up until 9.4 the 4770 was not supported on ATi's own drivers, and that the manufacturers had to release hothacked versions, I don't if subsequent driver releases added support for these new additions to the desktop GPU family.

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