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Windows keys....selling them legal?

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  • Windows keys....selling them legal?

    Ok here is my question, i have alot of Win XP home keys that i have from computers I have bought and paid for. The pc's themselves have come and gone but i still have Iso disks and valid keys....can i sell them legally?
    "Everyone makes fun of us rednecks with our big trucks and all our guns........until the zombie apocalypse"

  • #2
    Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

    were they OEM key copies?



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    • #3
      Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

      they were keys that came stuck to the PC case, so I dunno?
      "Everyone makes fun of us rednecks with our big trucks and all our guns........until the zombie apocalypse"

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      • #4
        Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

        Those are OEM keys, and are only tied to those systems. So no, you cannot sell them.

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        • #5
          Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

          guess i don't see why? they are my property and they are still valid keys?
          "Everyone makes fun of us rednecks with our big trucks and all our guns........until the zombie apocalypse"

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          • #6
            Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

            yes, but the keys are sold at a low price with a contract saying that they are only to be used with that system (motherboard/cpu, I don't know the exact rules but it is something to that effect).



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            • #7
              Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

              I am not sure it's a matter of legaltiy as a matter of the keys working on other systems. Typically the key on the side of a prebuilt computer only works for that model of computer with specific hardware. If someone has the exact model of system that the key came off of then it should work. Anything else probably will not, somehow the key is tied to the hardware.
              |TG-Irr|Avengingllama
              I used to eat paint chips. Now I just drink the paint because I couldn't find a salsa that went well with the chips and they were dry =)

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              • #8
                Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

                http://oem.microsoft.com/script/Cont...id=552846#faq2

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                • #9
                  Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

                  Originally posted by avenging llama View Post
                  I am not sure it's a matter of legaltiy as a matter of the keys working on other systems. Typically the key on the side of a prebuilt computer only works for that model of computer with specific hardware.
                  When you activate an OS key via MS, a hash of the hardware is sent along with the activation key. Reinstalling and activating the OS after changing major hardware components will cause a different hash to be sent. MS will typically allow this to happen 2 or 3 times before the key is disabled. But, there is an 800 number to call to get it reactivated and it's usually not a big deal.

                  So, although selling an OEM key may not be legal, it is technically possible to use the key on a different system.
                  Twisted Firestarter
                  a.k.a |TG| Harkonian
                  sigpic

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                  • #10
                    Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

                    Originally posted by venman View Post
                    guess i don't see why? they are my property and they are still valid keys?
                    Unfortunately, the keys are not your property. You need to read those license agreements! You were granted a license to USE the software, with the corresponding key, on the computer that sticker was attached to. You do not own the software nor the right to transfer it to anyone else.

                    It's quite similar to buying a movie on a DVD. You don't really own it, just a license to view it under certain conditions and numerous restrictions.

                    Personally, I'm not a fan of this type of "sale". I believe that you SHOULD be able to transfer that license to anyone you see fit. Unfortunately, those legal-types don't seem to agree with me. Damn them.
                    Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

                      Damn them all to hell.


                      Former E1st Heavyweight


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                      • #12
                        Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

                        Originally posted by Apophis View Post
                        Unfortunately, the keys are not your property. You need to read those license agreements! You were granted a license to USE the software, with the corresponding key, on the computer that sticker was attached to. You do not own the software nor the right to transfer it to anyone else.

                        It's quite similar to buying a movie on a DVD. You don't really own it, just a license to view it under certain conditions and numerous restrictions.

                        Personally, I'm not a fan of this type of "sale". I believe that you SHOULD be able to transfer that license to anyone you see fit. Unfortunately, those legal-types don't seem to agree with me. Damn them.
                        I agree also, but I think the OEM copy of windows doesn't fit in the same category as a DVD as you buy the OEM copy at a discount (win 7 pro $269 vs OEM $140) with rules to follow.



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                        • #13
                          Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

                          Originally posted by machowner View Post
                          I agree also, but I think the OEM copy of windows doesn't fit in the same category as a DVD as you buy the OEM copy at a discount (win 7 pro $269 vs OEM $140) with rules to follow.
                          I'm not entirely sure about the license on the retail as I've never read it in as much detail as the OEM. Anyone know if retail keys can be resold?
                          Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

                            Originally posted by Apophis View Post
                            I'm not entirely sure about the license on the retail as I've never read it in as much detail as the OEM. Anyone know if retail keys can be resold?
                            Yes, you can resell your retail key provided you did not use the key to upgrade to some other version of Windows. I suppose the same discounted price principle, if true, would apply to upgrade licenses too.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Windows keys....selling them legal?

                              Originally posted by Apophis View Post
                              Unfortunately, the keys are not your property. You need to read those license agreements! You were granted a license to USE the software, with the corresponding key, on the computer that sticker was attached to. You do not own the software nor the right to transfer it to anyone else.

                              It's quite similar to buying a movie on a DVD. You don't really own it, just a license to view it under certain conditions and numerous restrictions.

                              Personally, I'm not a fan of this type of "sale". I believe that you SHOULD be able to transfer that license to anyone you see fit. Unfortunately, those legal-types don't seem to agree with me. Damn them.
                              They need to refer to it as a license instead of 'a purchased copy of windows' as that is where the confusion comes into play.

                              Example from MS's Genuine Windows FAQ:

                              Q:
                              What do I do if my system fails validation, but I am certain that I purchased/have a genuine copy of Windows?
                              A:

                              When a copy of Windows fails validation, the user is directed to a customized Web page with details about what caused the failure and recommendations for how to fix the problem. This page contains a section with troubleshooting steps. One of these steps will let you check to see whether you can use the online Product Key Update Tool. If your computer came with a genuine product key, but Windows was improperly installed using an invalid product key, the Product Key Update Tool helps convert your computer to a genuine status without having to purchase a new copy of Windows. If this solution does not work, refer to the instructions above for what to do when your system fails validation.
                              http://www.microsoft.com/genuine/downloads/FAQ.aspx

                              http://store.microsoft.com/microsoft...oduct/7ADA0BF6 <- Windows 7 purchase page, no link to a EULA, no reference to the fact that it is a license or any other information to clarify that you aren't buying a copy of Windows. The opposite is there, with a note for: Before you buy which has details about what to do when you buy.

                              If even Microsoft doesn't call it a license, no one will treat it like one.
                              |TG-6th|Snooggums

                              Just because everyone does something does not mean that it is right to do.

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