Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

    Look at this stuff;

    http://www.nanocoolers.com/technology_liquid.php

    That's some serious cool right there.

  • #2
    Re: Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

    Man, that looks slick! Some type of liquid state nanometal, used as a coolant? Where can I get one of these?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

      Moving liquid metal... I smell magnetic interference with everything.
      USAR

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

        Yes squeak there will be horrible magnetic interference I am sure they overlooked that ginormous issue when designing a part to be put in a computer.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

          Originally posted by TG_Mateo
          Man, that looks slick! Some type of liquid state nanometal, used as a coolant? Where can I get one of these?
          i've emailed them to ask as they seem to be the only ones making a LMC system so far, but no reply yet.

          Apparently the ATi is supposedly using the same technology in it's new X850. Not that i can find any mention of it in the X850's blurb though.



          lol micr0c0sm

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

            This seems a little bit familiar...

            http://www.unknownworlds.com/forums/...howtopic=94436


            Originally posted by Black_Viper Of Natural Selection Forums
            Pages: (2) [1] 2 For You Overclockers, Super cooling that lasts...

            Liquid Metal Cooling
            http://www.nanocoolers.com/technology_liquid.php
            Edit: Removed image, looked like crap.

            So does this mean i can overclock my PC to like 5 Ghz?
            I too e-mailed them to get some information, but i havent heard back from them yet... Been 3 days.
            Last edited by Black_V!per; 06-11-2005, 05:24 PM.
            Oyee

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

              That's a coincedence! Did you see we posted within 1/2 an hour of each other?

              Cutting edge, us. Eh? :)

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

                Wow thats freaky, but i beat u, lol, i posted on another forum before the NS forums, id link it, but its got nude pics on there, and i dont think thats allowed here.
                Oyee

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

                  Originally posted by Black_V!per
                  Wow thats freaky, but i beat u, lol, i posted on another forum before the NS forums, id link it, but its got nude pics on there, and i dont think thats allowed here.
                  As long as you warn people of the nature of the link, and you don't display anything offensive here, you should be OK.
                  Become a supporting member!
                  Buy a Tactical Duck!
                  Take the world's smallest political quiz! "I was touched by His Noodly Appendage."
                  TacticalGamer TX LAN/BBQ Veteran:

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

                    The EM pump appeals to me as a physicist. A very simple solution, but how do they find a metal which will stay liquid at such low temperatures? Presumably, it would have to stay liquid when the computer was switched off and sat in a cold house i.e. 10C or less. If it ever solidified, it would reduce in volume and probably cause the pipes to crack. It would then leak out the next time it was heated. It would be good if they stated which metal or metal alloy they used.
                    Wintermute

                    Play EVE online. It's like being an accounting addict in space.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

                      Originally posted by Wintermute
                      The EM pump appeals to me as a physicist. A very simple solution, but how do they find a metal which will stay liquid at such low temperatures? Presumably, it would have to stay liquid when the computer was switched off and sat in a cold house i.e. 10C or less. If it ever solidified, it would reduce in volume and probably cause the pipes to crack. It would then leak out the next time it was heated. It would be good if they stated which metal or metal alloy they used.
                      Wouldn't mercury qualify for this?
                      Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

                        I read somewhere that it was gallium.
                        Become a supporting member!
                        Buy a Tactical Duck!
                        Take the world's smallest political quiz! "I was touched by His Noodly Appendage."
                        TacticalGamer TX LAN/BBQ Veteran:

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

                          pretty nice looking system, and i doubt there will be any magnetic interference if the engineers making it work hard enough. The magnets will probably just direct their force in a highly concentrated way, so as to keep the force contained. If the unit is placed in the computer properly, the magnetic force shouldn't target any of the other components of the computer... It'll be interesting to see how the system turns out.
                          OWN3D!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Water? No. Liquid metal is what you want

                            Originally posted by Crunkimus
                            pretty nice looking system, and i doubt there will be any magnetic interference if the engineers making it work hard enough. The magnets will probably just direct their force in a highly concentrated way, so as to keep the force contained. If the unit is placed in the computer properly, the magnetic force shouldn't target any of the other components of the computer... It'll be interesting to see how the system turns out.
                            Magnets do not 'direct their force' for two reasons.
                            1) They produce a magnetic field, which is not the same as a force, although that is a technicality.
                            2) Magnetic fields tend to be ellipsoidal. This is because magnetic field lines do not end, they always form a loop. You can see this looking at the bottom diagram if you follow the link above. You can think of them as being analogous to contour lines on a map.This makes it hard to produce a confined field.

                            There will be two fields to consider. The field from the electromagnets in the pump and the field from the moving electrons in the liquid metal as it flows around the pipes.

                            Gallium looks like a good bet for the metal.
                            Standard state: solid at 298 K (25C) (but melts only slightly above this temperature)
                            It is the only metal, except for mercury, caesium, and rubidium, which can be liquid near room temperatures. It has one of the longest liquid ranges of any metal and has a low vapour pressure even at high temperatures.
                            Gallium is normally a byproduct of the manufacture of aluminium.
                            The metal expands on solidifying; therefore, it should not be stored in glass or metal containers, as they may break as the metal solidifies.
                            http://www.webelements.com/webelemen...xt/Ga/key.html

                            However it would still solidify at room temperature or below which may crack the pipes.
                            Wintermute

                            Play EVE online. It's like being an accounting addict in space.

                            Comment

                            Connect

                            Collapse

                            TeamSpeak 3 Server

                            Collapse

                            Advertisement

                            Collapse

                            Twitter Feed

                            Collapse

                            Working...
                            X