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  • OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

    I invite comments on my initial attempts at overclocking my new build.

    The core is cooled with a Corsair H50 water cooler.



    Hard to see, but that is 180.5 MHz x 21.0
    Core Speed: 3790 MHz


    I basically followed the settings posted to the Overclock.net forum:
    "Bios settings:

    Ai Overclock (manual)
    CPU Ratio Setting (21)
    Speedstep (disabled)
    BCLK Freq (191)
    PCIE Freq (101)
    Dram Freq (auto)
    UCLK (auto)
    OPI Link Data Rate (auto)

    All RAM timings are on auto

    CPU Voltage (1.3)
    CPU PLL Voltage (1.80)
    QPI/DRAM Core Voltage (1.20)
    IOH Voltage (1.10)
    IOH PCIE Voltage (1.50)
    ICH Voltage (1.10)
    ICH PCIE Voltage (1.50)
    DRAM Bus Voltage (1.64) was either that or 1.66

    Rest of voltages on auto

    LLC (enabled)"

    Except for LLC (what is that?)

    I have also see references to turnig on (or off?) hyperthreading -- but have yet to identify this in my settings.

    Initial tests with Prime95 suggest the above changes in my bios are stable.
    sigpic

  • #2
    Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

    get that up to 4ghz 200x20. (or similar to achieve 4ghz) LLC is load line calibration. leave it on. voltages look ok. leave hyper threading on. its what makes those i7s so beastly.

    as for dram frequency put it aroudn 2000mhz but you might need to drop down to 1600ish rams harder to tweek and get right.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

      Very odd day.

      All was fine during the day, running fraps on loop, BCBF2 and TS.

      Same thing tonight but CPU keeps freezing (screen just freezes) about ten minutes or so into the game. Tried with TS off, same thing. Tried with bumb down to 160 x 21 -- same.

      Had the resource monitor running and temps were fine. Load was also no where near the top levels.

      Will try again at stock settings in BIOS to eliminate any possibility it is due to my tweaking.

      More latter . . .
      sigpic

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

        Update:

        I reset the BIOS to defaults, but cranked the core multiplier to 22 (system max).

        This render a stable game, with fraps and with TS.

        I did notice a reoccuring microsec stutter when Fraps is on in LOOP mode, which disappears when the core is running over 3000 Mhz.

        More testing tomorrow.

        Still do not understand why the system would be stable all afternoon, then fail repeatedly later that evening.
        sigpic

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        • #5
          Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

          Ahh, the pitfalls of overclocking. As soon as you undertake any degree of overclocking on your cpu, ram or motherboard frequencies and voltages, you introduce the element of uncertainty: uncertainty of whether your overclocking has caused your computer to become unstable, caused it to crash a game to desktop, caused it to hard freeze, or any other computer hiccups. Basically, any time ANYTHING goes wrong, you'll be asking yourself if it's because of the overclocking.

          Let me share some of the experience I have gained through overclocking my computers.

          You should run your Memory at default frequencies or close to it. In other words, while you're pushing your Core i7 930 up to 3.6 GHz, 3.8 GHz and beyond, you should adjust the DRAM ratios to make sure that your memory is running close to the frequency it was meant to operate at. That means if you're using DDR3-1600 MHz memory, try to keep it as close to or even under 1600 MHz. I believe in the ASUS BIOS it will be as simple as selecting a frequency for your RAM under the choices that are available. The reason I suggest this is because running DDR3 memory at higher frequencies, such as 2000 MHz, will introduce another variable that could be causing system instability while giving you an imperceivable performance benefit. The only difference you will see is when you run synthetic memory bandwidth benchmarks.

          Overclocking has become so widespread that you can easily find the well-documented upper limits of any mainstream processor. In the case of most Core i7 9xx series processors, the upper limit is somewhere around 4 GHz on decent coolilng. That is useful because it gives you a specific number that you probably shouldn't push beyond, and honestly I would make sure to keep it safely under that unless you decide one day that overclocking hardware to its limits is your calling in life. It's all about measuring the risk vs. the reward. As an example, you're at 3.8 GHz right now which is fantastic. Do you really need to hit 4 GHz then? Sure you might get an extra 200 MHz on your overclock, but you place your processor in further risk of being damaged while gaining an improvement in performance that you will likely never notice. Ask yourself questions such as: if someone set my computer to 3.8 GHz and then changed it to 4 GHz without telling me and I went along doing everything I normally do on this computer, would I even know any different?

          Leaving Intel Speedstep on is a good idea. Under heavy load, the CPU will still ratchet up to it's highest overclocked frequency that you have adjusted in the BIOS. But under lighter loads or when your system is idle, instead of being constantly cranked up to 3.8 GHz, it will automatically step the CPU frequency down to ~2 GHz. That should reduce the power your computer draws, reduce the heat that it generates and also theoretically extend the health of your processor.

          Lastly, processors will degrade very slightly over time. Heavy overclocking will generally accelerate this process a bit. Keep this in mind as it is not uncommon to see that while your CPU is able to hold a certain overlocked frequency right now, 1 or 2 years down the road it might not be stable at that frequency anymore.

          Sorry for the lengthy post, but this is just stuff I thought you should know off the top of my head.

          For reference, I am currently running a Core i7 920 2.66 GHz @ 3.4 GHz on an Asus P6T Deluxe V2. It's been running stable at this overclock for over a year now.
          "Looking for brahs to come fight crime with me" - Unload



          Comment


          • #6
            Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

            Gosh, don't apologize for being expectionally helpful, VooDoo!

            I briefly had the beast running at 4GHz today, with core temp hovering around 55C, but in the mid 70s during BFBC2 with Fraps on LOOP (rec).

            I just took some of your advice and turned Speedstep back on, and reduced my CPU load from 190 x 21 to 180 x 21.

            As you suggest, I am looking for a good balance between power and low temp. I'll likely be replacing the chip every two years, so longevity is not much of an issue, but I do not want to fry my MoB.

            At 4GHz the Corsair H50 radiator was very warm to the touch, and temps were often in the high 70s during full power processes. Temps hit 90 very quickly will running Prime95.

            One set of OCing instructions says that I should not be overclocking my GPU as well. Yet, my 5870 has a built in slider that bumps up the GPU speed a bit. Does this have no utility?

            At my new setting of 180 x 21 prime 95 still heats the cores to 90 within a few minutes, but normal usuage sees temps in the low 50s.

            I'll see how BFBC2 w. Fraps rec moves the temp.

            What you you say is a reasonable temperature target for such a very heavy gaming load?

            Aside from changing DRAM Bus Volt from AUTO (1.5) to 1.64, CPU volt from AUTO (1.2) to 1.3, and QPI/DRAM Volt from AUTO (1.2) to 1.25, I have made no other changes to voltage or RAM.

            My ram is 6G of Patriot Viper Sector 7 PC3-1600 2000MHz.

            Oddly enough, even at 3800 MHz, when I crank all the settings in BFBC2 to or near the max I only get 50 FPS while rec with Fraps and I see a reoccuring stutter. Seems odd to have so much power and a 5870 GPU and still being short of full settings cabability.
            Last edited by E-Male; 09-03-2010, 03:43 PM.
            sigpic

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            • #7
              Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

              Oh I made a mistake in assuming that your memory was rated at 1600 MHz. If you have DDR3 memory that is capable of running at 2000 MHz, then by all means run it at 2000 MHz!

              Those voltage settings look great and are safe. I personally have my DRAM voltage at 1.64, like you, and I have my CPU voltage somewhere around 1.3.

              As far as target temperatures, a lot of this depends on the local climate and your ambient room temperature. As a general rule of thumb, I don't really want my processor exceeding 80 C for a prolonged time when I'm gaming or performing CPU intensive tasks. Prime95 is a different story. Prime95 puts a burden on your CPU in a way that is unrealistic and uncommon in every day use. It is designed to do this in order to fully challenge and test your CPU stability. In other words, don't worry about what temperature your CPU rises to while being loaded by Prime95. Just track what your CPU peaks at during gaming or other cpu-heavy tasks. If it stays under 80 C, you should be perfectly fine.

              I personally never overclock my graphics card. I don't think it's worth the risk. I also think graphics cards are more delicate and are already being pushed to their thermal limits at default clocks. For instance, while I'm playing BC2, my GeForce GTX 275 consistently hits a scary 92C!! The last time I ran my graphics card at an overclocked setting for a prolonged time, it eventually burned out. It started off by displaying visual artifacts on screen and it eventually just stopped working altogether.

              FRAPS - When you capture videos in-game using FRAPS, you have to choose capture settings. One of those settings is the framerate that you want your video captured in. So let's say, for instance, you chose 50fps for your video capture. That means when you record in-game, your video will be captured at 50 frames per second (assuming your hardware is capable of rendering the game quickly enough) and consequently, your game will also be capped at 50fps. That's the reason why it appears your framerate is slower or locked at 50 when you record in game. As for the reoccurring stutter, I'm not sure exactly why that happens, it might just be related to the burden of recording a video while playing the game.
              "Looking for brahs to come fight crime with me" - Unload



              Comment


              • #8
                Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

                Thanks again. More details.

                Temp during gamingnow runs between 60 -75 (during a heat wave here). So all is well there. Regular cpu use sees temps drop to low 50s.

                I think the stutter is an effect of various BFBC2 servers, as it is inconsistent (Just now, on TG, no probs).

                I dropped Anti Aliasing down to 4x and A-Filter to 8x -- not at all certain that I see any difference at higher settings but will continue to change the settings and see what results.

                I'll drop my GPU settings down to defaults on your advice and see if any noticable change.

                Currently, on the TG server, I am getting 55 to 60 FPS while recording with Fraps, which is fantastic (mu old cpu would give me something like 18 fps in BF2...).

                So aside from a bit more testing of BCBF2 video testing against the TG server, I think all is fine.

                One area is on clear to me -- the OC of the RAM that you mention above. I have the settings on AUTO at the moment but noticed that I have the option in certain areas to select 2000Mhz -- I`ll note those setting areas and get back to you next week.

                The long weekend, and my next marathon run (Sunday), is upon me.

                Later (and much thanks!),
                sigpic

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

                  Is this the RAM that you're using?

                  http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...-500-_-Product

                  If it is that model, then you might be able to run your memory at 2000 MHz. You can try setting it to that in the BIOS and seeing how it affects your performance. You probably won't notice any difference though. Honestly, if everything is running well right now, which it sounds like it is, I wouldn't mess with it. Just enjoy your computer! And good luck with the marathon!
                  "Looking for brahs to come fight crime with me" - Unload



                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

                    Yes, that is my ram.

                    Curious. The past two nights (and at night only), I have been getting complete cpu freezes while playing BFBC2 -- the screen just freezes -- forcing a reboot. Tried diff bios settings and nothing solved the repeat problem until tonight, when I reset the bios to defaults and set 160 x 22 (which gives 3531 MHz and temps under 65C while Fraps Rec).

                    I changed a few other settings as well -- will have to go back and have a closer look at what I did (damn it for not writing it down at the time...).

                    I will not make any further changes for a few nights, then I'll slowly increase the BCLK.

                    As this time I did NOT make any changes to any voltages, therein may lie my problem.

                    Ahh, the pleasures of OCing . . .
                    sigpic

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

                      Originally posted by E-Male View Post

                      I dropped Anti Aliasing down to 4x and A-Filter to 8x -- not at all certain that I see any difference at higher settings but will continue to change the settings and see what results.
                      Kind of off topic, but you may want to experiment...

                      from

                      http://www.tweakguides.com/Graphics_11.html

                      Antialiasing Levels

                      The first choice you have to make if you want to enable AA is the sample rate, typically expressed as 2x, 4x, 6x etc. This tells your graphics hardware how many pixel samples to take around the area to antialias - the higher the number, the more pixel samples used to blend the jagged lines, and hence the smoother the image will appear at the cost of greater processing power and hence lower performance.

                      Importantly, since your resolution can also affect how many pixel samples are already being taken, and hence how smooth your graphics appear in general, you can experiment with altering both your resolution and AA level to see which provides the best combination of performance and image quality. For example 8x AA is typically sufficient at 1280x720, while you may only need 2x AA to achieve the same effect at 1920x1200, and your overall performance may be better as well. There is no hard and fast rule as to which performs or looks best, it depends on your particular hardware combination, monitor limitations and taste. Remember that on LCD monitors, when the display is not at its native resolution, a crude form of antialiasing with no performance impact is already in effect because your graphics card or monitor has to digitally rescale the image and in doing so has to recalculate and blend pixels - see the end of the Resolution section for more details.
                      Anisotropic Levels

                      You can select from a variety of texture sample rates that range from 1x to 16x depending on your particular graphics hardware. The higher the sample rate the crisper distant textures will appear at the cost of lower performance. The performance impact will differ, however more recent graphics cards now use highly optimized methods of selective AF, and can do even 8x or 16x AF with minimal impact on FPS, even at high resolutions.
                      Skud


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                      • #12
                        Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

                        ok one thing ill say is did you flash to the latest R3E bios? that can sometimes make a fair difference. i run a very stable overclock with an i7920 and R2E mobo of 4ghz with 200x20 1.25 volts and 1.64 on the ram for 1600mhz (wont run at 2000 even though thats the spec i bought it at :( ) 1.3v or less should be all you would need for a stable 4ghz overclock. as for temps hitting 90s in prime. no program or game or anything will ever stress your cpu like that so dont worry about it. the crashing problems you are getting might be related to something else.. make sure you are all driver updated and stuff.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

                          Originally posted by E-Male View Post
                          Update:

                          I reset the BIOS to defaults, but cranked the core multiplier to 22 (system max).

                          This render a stable game, with fraps and with TS.

                          I did notice a reoccuring microsec stutter when Fraps is on in LOOP mode, which disappears when the core is running over 3000 Mhz.

                          More testing tomorrow.

                          Still do not understand why the system would be stable all afternoon, then fail repeatedly later that evening.
                          If you have EPU Engine installed, I'd remove it immediately. That's what causes an unstable system in most overclocks on ASUS boards. People don't realize that EPU engine itself is a software overclocker and is adding on to what you've already done in BIOS.
                          |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
                          TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
                          Former 9th & 13th

                          Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
                          Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





                          SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

                          TG Primer and Rules

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                          • #14
                            Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

                            Originally posted by Acreo Aeneas View Post
                            If you have EPU Engine installed, I'd remove it immediately. That's what causes an unstable system in most overclocks on ASUS boards. People don't realize that EPU engine itself is a software overclocker and is adding on to what you've already done in BIOS.
                            Do you have any details on diabling the EPU engine ine the RIII ?? I cannot find much in the forums. Is your info current?

                            Are you referring to the C1E and Speedstep options?

                            Does this install go under another name -- such as TurboV EVO?

                            Thank you,
                            sigpic

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: OC'ing a Rampage III, i7-930, 6 gig Viper II 2000 MHz

                              Originally posted by E-Male View Post
                              Do you have any details on diabling the EPU engine ine the RIII ?? I cannot find much in the forums. Is your info current?

                              Are you referring to the C1E and Speedstep options?

                              Does this install go under another name -- such as TurboV EVO?

                              Thank you,
                              Speedstep and C1E are fine. As for EPU engine, you'd have to install it yourself. So if you don't know about it, likely chances are you never installed it. If you have and don't remember, it should show up in "Programs and Features" in Control Panel as "EPU Engine" or something similar. All you'd have to do is uninstall it.
                              |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
                              TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
                              Former 9th & 13th

                              Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
                              Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





                              SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

                              TG Primer and Rules

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