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  • Video card -> 7pin to component -> Television

    This setup isn't working for me, should it?

    Philips 27PT6441 27 inch TV

    Nvidia 8800gs



    From the video card I have a 7 pin(S video looking connector) to component dongle, that connects to a 12ft component cable, which goes into the component set on the TV.

    When plugged in I receive a very garbled image. At one point while playing around with the settings(mainly resolution and refresh rate) I managed to get the image viewable but it was skewed diagonally and triplicated. Obviously my desktop though, so I am transmitting the image.

    I am guessing that it is the timing of the signal that I haven't got right, but I have almost exhausted my options for tweaking it. Anyone see anything obvious that I have missed or know a secret code to input?
    |TG-12th| Namebot


  • #2
    Re: Video card -> 7pin to component -> Television

    Make sure the pins in your cables are all in working order. I tried hooking my tv up to my computer via a HDMI<>DVI cable unsuccessfully (biggest irritation was that my computer fully recognized the TV, even the model number and everything) and I never figured out what was wrong until my brother looked inside the HDMI end of the cable and saw that one of the leads was broken. (Lesson learned: Fry's may actually sell some reasonably-priced cables but just order through Newegg/MWave next time.)

    That said...
    S-Video -> Component tends to be a little finicky, so you might consider (if your TV has the port) a straight S-Video cable.
    S-Video relevant resolutions (Wikipedia):
    720 x 576i @ 50 Hz
    720 x 480i @ 59.94 Hz

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    • #3
      Re: Video card -&gt; 7pin to component -&gt; Television

      To clarify, my understanding is that the 7 pin plug carries signals for S-video, component, and composite. So the dongle doesn't actually transform any signaling. I'm not sure if this changes your suggestion.
      |TG-12th| Namebot

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      • #4
        Re: Video card -&gt; 7pin to component -&gt; Television

        Do you have a picture of this 7-pin plug?

        Does it have two rows of pins, 3 on top and 4 on bottom with a black plastic part under the 2nd row?

        I did a quick search and found this converter. I'm not sure I'd trust that vendor as it does seem a bit flaky to me, but at least it seems like a genuine enough product.

        (I've never seen a 7-pin S-Video connector, though Wikipedia assures me they exist.)
        |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
        TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
        Former 9th & 13th

        Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
        Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





        SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

        TG Primer and Rules

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        • #5
          Re: Video card -&gt; 7pin to component -&gt; Television

          Originally posted by Namebot View Post
          To clarify, my understanding is that the 7 pin plug carries signals for S-video, component, and composite. So the dongle doesn't actually transform any signaling. I'm not sure if this changes your suggestion.
          We need to make a clarification of terms:
          Composite: Video is one plug, Yellow RCA. Color and Brightness are one signal.
          Component: Video is three plugs, generally a Green, Blue, and Orange-ish RCA. Brightness and Color are separated, with Color split into another two signals, for a total of three separate feeds.

          Assuming that it is in fact component and not composite: S-Video isn't going to carry a component signal, as it splits the video into only two signals (Color and Brightness). The problem with 7-pin S-Video is that it's non-standard. Generally, one of the extra pins will carry the old yellow RCA Composite feed while the other two are...well, a crap-shoot. They might be control signals, they might be nothing, it varies between each device. As such, S-Video-to-Component has an extra step in conversion, trying to further separate the color signal, which is probably where you're running into problems.

          Best advice? If your TV has it, just use a 4-pin S-video cable. It'll work just fine in the 7-pin port on your video card. Otherwise? You might want to use an S-Video-to-Composite cable instead.

          Originally posted by Acreo Aeneas View Post
          (I've never seen a 7-pin S-Video connector, though Wikipedia assures me they exist.)
          7-pin S-Video is a computer/laptop thing. Basically, it's done that way so you have access to both S-Video and a yellow RCA plug on output. However, like I said, it's non-standardized, so it's more or less random what a particular device does on those three extra leads.

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          • #6
            Re: Video card -&gt; 7pin to component -&gt; Television

            It is component, the card also came with a composite adapter(EDIT: actually the composite dongle didn't come with it, but I have one and know the difference). The coming with the video card part is mostly what led me to believe that it would work easily enough. Just try S-video then? :(
            Last edited by Namebot; 09-22-2010, 08:19 AM.
            |TG-12th| Namebot

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Video card -&gt; 7pin to component -&gt; Television

              Originally posted by Flarfignuggen View Post
              We need to make a clarification of terms:
              Composite: Video is one plug, Yellow RCA. Color and Brightness are one signal.
              Component: Video is three plugs, generally a Green, Blue, and Orange-ish RCA. Brightness and Color are separated, with Color split into another two signals, for a total of three separate feeds.

              Assuming that it is in fact component and not composite: S-Video isn't going to carry a component signal, as it splits the video into only two signals (Color and Brightness). The problem with 7-pin S-Video is that it's non-standard. Generally, one of the extra pins will carry the old yellow RCA Composite feed while the other two are...well, a crap-shoot. They might be control signals, they might be nothing, it varies between each device. As such, S-Video-to-Component has an extra step in conversion, trying to further separate the color signal, which is probably where you're running into problems.

              Best advice? If your TV has it, just use a 4-pin S-video cable. It'll work just fine in the 7-pin port on your video card. Otherwise? You might want to use an S-Video-to-Composite cable instead.



              7-pin S-Video is a computer/laptop thing. Basically, it's done that way so you have access to both S-Video and a yellow RCA plug on output. However, like I said, it's non-standardized, so it's more or less random what a particular device does on those three extra leads.
              It must be only found on certain laptops. None of my dedicated video cards that had S-Video outs ever were 7 pin (they were all the standard 4 pin).
              |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
              TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
              Former 9th & 13th

              Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
              Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





              SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

              TG Primer and Rules

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