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  • At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

    This story appeared on Network World at
    http://www.networkworld.com/news/201...bama-ipv6.html

    At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue
    NTIA workshop is current administration's first attempt at promoting next-gen


    By Carolyn Duffy Marsan, Network World
    September 28, 2010 09:07 AM ET
    Sponsored by:

    The Obama Administration bills itself as the most tech-savvy political team ever, but until now it has ignored one of the biggest issues facing the Internet: the rapid depletion of Internet addresses using the current protocol, known as IPv4, and the imminent need for carriers and content providers to adopt a new standard called IPv6.



    Today, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) will host a workshop on IPv6 that features high-profile executives from government, industry and Internet policymaking organizations.

    This workshop is the first time the Obama Administration has given IPv6 any publicity in the 21 months it has been in office. Indeed, government insiders say Federal CIO Vivek Kundra didn't ask them about agencies' progress on IPv6 until last week, when he began preparing for NTIA's workshop.

    IPv6 is the biggest upgrade in the 40-year history of the Internet. Forward-looking carriers and enterprises are deploying IPv6 because the Internet is running out of IP addresses using the current standard, known as IPv4.

    IPv4 uses 32-bit addresses and can support 4.3 billion devices connected directly to the Internet. IPv6, on the other hand, uses 128-bit addresses and supports a virtually unlimited number of devices -- 2 to the 128th power.

    - About 94.5% of IPv4 address space has been allocated as of Sept. 3, 2010, according to the American Registry for Internet Numbers, which delegates blocks of IPv4 and IPv6 addresses to carriers and enterprises in North America. Experts say IPv4 addresses could run out as early as December but will certainly be gone by the end of 2011.

    The Obama Administration's silence on IPv6 has stood in stark contrast to the Bush Administration, which was aggressive in setting IPv6-related goals during its tenure.

    In 2005, the Bush Administration's Office of Management and Budget (OMB) established and ultimately met a deadline of June 30, 2008 for all federal agencies to demonstrate IPv6 capabilities on their backbone networks.

    The Bush Administration also created an IPv6 testing and certification process for IT products that is managed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Also in 2005, Bush officials proposed a change to the Federal Acquisition Regulations that requires agencies to purchase IPv6-enabled hardware and software; the law went into effect July 2010.

    An NTIA official said the Commerce Department agency has been working behind the scenes with Internet policymaking and technical bodies regarding IPv4 depletion and the need to deploy IPv6. The IPv6 workshop is the first chance the agency has had to raise the visibility of the issue within the Obama Administration and across U.S. industry overall.

    "This is a critical issue, with the depletion of IPv4 addresses expected at the end of 2011," the NTIA official added. "NTIA, the Federal IPv6 task force, OMB and NIST have been working behind the scenes and keeping IPv6 on the radar screen. But we wanted to push this up to the higher levels and get a higher focus on this for all industry and government stakeholders."

    Industry executives involved in the IPv6 workshop were unwilling to criticize Kundra or Federal CTO Aneesh Chopra for their delayed interest in IPv6. Instead, they expressed satisfaction that the Obama Administration is finally giving the issue visibility.

    "What I found striking is that both the U.S. CIO and CTO are together on the same day, on two back-to-back panels, addressing IPv6," said Ram Mohan, executive vice president with Afilias, a registry that operates .info and a dozen other Internet domains, and a panelist at the NTIA IPv6 workshop. "It's fabulous in terms of spurring adoption and in terms of shining a spotlight on this issue."

    "If you look at the 10 or 15 ways that the government may influence change and evolution on the Internet, the two places they can do it best is by voting with their dollars and by articulating and building awareness about the need for change, which is what this workshop is aimed at," said Danny McPherson, vice president for research and development at VeriSign, who is giving a keynote address at the IPv6 workshop.

    "This workshop shows the realization that everyone has got to accept this and to move forward with the coexistence of IPv4 and IPv6 and to understand what that means for their operational, budgeting and development time frames," McPherson added.

    The workshop will feature two panels: one focused on industry issues and the other on government issues. Speakers on the industry panel include: Vint Cerf, one of the co-designers of the Internet's foundational protocol, TCP/IP, and now a Google executive; as well as representatives from U.S. companies such as Comcast, Verizon and Akamai that are leading the charge toward IPv6.

    "The main point of the industry panel is to raise the visibility of IPv6 to service providers as an important issue for them for the continuation of their businesses and the importance of it in being able to keep the Internet running in America," said John Curran, CEO of ARIN and one of the panelists. "Some of the largest players are moving in this direction. The federal government is moving in this direction, and it's important to the nation as a whole to move in this direction."

    Curran says it's surprising how many carriers, hosting companies and content providers have yet to announce their IPv6 plans. He's hoping that NTIA's IPv6 workshop will prompt them to commit to a product road map for IPv6.

    "One would hope that if you're a service provider of any form – transit, hosting or content distribution—that you've heard about IPv6 and are planning for it," Curran says. "You'd be amazed at how many still don't have a firm plan or are still thinking this is a hypothetical situation."

    The government panel will feature representatives of the federal IPv6 task force, NIST and the U.S. Defense Department, which is interested in IPv6 to support sensor networks and emerging mobility applications.

    The government panel is expected to discuss the progress agencies are making at adopting IPv6 and following an IPv6 road map that was released last year by the Federal CIO Council.

    "As far as IPv6 goes, this administration has been silent. They've just assumed that agencies have been progressing in their tech refresh," said one federal IT executive. "That's a great assumption, but nobody has done a survey or a report card to see how we are doing against our road map….I'm hoping this administration will re-emphasize the importance of IPv6 and make a strategic commitment to it."

    Read more about lans & wans in Network World's LANs & WANs section.
    Randy = Ace ! - Warlab
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  • #2
    Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

    But, but, ISPs dont like v6 cause it makes filesharing easy and damn near untraceable! Where will the RIAA and MPAA get their kickbacks from if we adopt the only viable standard? Oh, wait, who cares?

    I'm just in it for the show. I guarantee that the interwebs-at-large and corporate america is not going to adopt a v6 standard before we run out of IP addresses. Its going to be absolutely hilarious to watch when people cant get domain names anymore because we're out of IP addresses.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

      Originally posted by Ferris Bueller View Post
      But, but, ISPs dont like v6 cause it makes filesharing easy and damn near untraceable! Where will the RIAA and MPAA get their kickbacks from if we adopt the only viable standard? Oh, wait, who cares?

      I'm just in it for the show. I guarantee that the interwebs-at-large and corporate america is not going to adopt a v6 standard before we run out of IP addresses. Its going to be absolutely hilarious to watch when people cant get domain names anymore because we're out of IP addresses.
      You forget, the whole of the internet isn't solely dominated by business tycoons and large businesses. A lot of the webmasters out there are small fry like myself. Besides, those big guys are domain squatting anyways, the lack of IPs aren't going to affect their means of registering new domains as they already have millions to choose from due to their greedy ass whoring.
      |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
      TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
      Former 9th & 13th

      Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
      Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





      SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

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      • #4
        Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

        would be pretty funny if they didnt implement IPv6 and we just ran out of IPs to allocate.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

          Originally posted by Jackspyder View Post
          would be pretty funny if they didnt implement IPv6 and we just ran out of IPs to allocate.
          Gamer: "Hey why's no one on the [insert game here] server?"
          Server Admin: "We ran out of IPs for everyone. Wait a few years while everyone sorts it out."

          Let's hope they IPv6 becomes standardized and replaces IPv4. Otherwise when the day comes when we're out of assignable IPs, we'll all be suffering.
          |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
          TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
          Former 9th & 13th

          Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
          Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





          SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

          TG Primer and Rules

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

            I'm wondering when the Tea Party is going to start protesting.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

              OK... so domains are NOT going to suffer if we run out of IP's. for several reasons.
              1) they already have their IP.
              2) you can drop an unlimited amount of domains behind 1 IP address, then use local DNS to route to multiple boxes, then to multiple sites on each box. I personally run more than 30, and the only reason they are on 2 separate boxes is because I run them for separate organizations.
              3) static IP's are locked at the provider. so, even companies hosting sites locally, can purchase a static from the ISP. It is the cell phones who will be in trouble first, since they have the most dynamic IP's. then DSL and Cable. Even though for the most part you have the same IP with both, it is still dynamic, and changed every time sync drops.

              I for one cannot believe how incredibly short sighted Al Gore was to assume that we would only need 4.3 Billion IP's when there were more people on the planet at the time the tech was being invented. I understand not foreseeing each person having multiple IP's (I alone have 6 public IP's between work, home, cell, etc. not to mention the 500 or more private IP's I manage behind those public ones.) but still, with tech moving the direction it is, I see phone implants and high res contacts... and I am just joe shmoe. I also see running out of phone number in the US within 5 years. Skype, google voice, cell phones, vonage, magic jack, VOIP, SIP, onstar, sync...

              I believe assigning a static IP to a person (64 bit IP - basically, instead of 0.0.0.0-255.255.255.255, you get 0.0.0.0-511.511.511.511) then giving them a subnet extension (my IP is 123.123.123.123... then: desktop .001, 2nd desktop .002, laptop .003, phone .004, slingbox .005, printer .006, tv .007, bluray .008, xbox .009, ps3 .010, wii .011, skype phone .012 etc.) would be a forever fix, and allow for connectivity between my device to be seamless across the planet. not to mention a person's phone number(s) - no matter what ISP/carrier - would just be that IP - solving two problems at once.
              Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former. -Albert Einstein
              The two most common elements in the universe are Hydrogen and stupidity. -Harlan Ellison

              If all else fails: "rm -rf /"

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

                Dynamic IP does NOT mean that your address changes each time you lose connection. That's strictly a policy of your DHCP provider. The ISC reference DHCP server attempts to issue the same address on each re-connect, even after the lease has expired. It remembers associations even for expired leases. Only when all addresses in the pool are in use do you start to see reassignments.

                I don't recall for certain if the Microsoft DHCP server reuses the old address assignment but I think it does forget expired associations, so you may indeed get a reassignment if the lease expires. Note that the lease may be longer than the disconnect period, so simply disconnecting doesn't mean you get a new address. But a host can issue an explicit lease release and, with a "forgetful" server, expect a new address to be assigned.

                With plenty of addresses and a server that remembers across expirations, one would expect never to get a new address. This should be the case in an IPv6 environment.
                Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

                  Decent article at arstechnica on the issue:

                  http://arstechnica.com/business/news...ll-be-ugly.ars
                  Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                  snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                  Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

                    what I am saying is: with cable and DSL you do have a dynamic IP, and it usually does change after an outage. IE when you lose sync on the modem - it usually is not just you, and dozens or even thousands of ppl are all reconnecting at the sametime... IP's get rearranged. since dialup is no longer a major player, this would put these dsl and cable dynamic IP's at second greatest risk behind cell phones.
                    Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former. -Albert Einstein
                    The two most common elements in the universe are Hydrogen and stupidity. -Harlan Ellison

                    If all else fails: "rm -rf /"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

                      The outage would have to last longer than the lease time. If your PC is connected directly to the Internet, then in a console window, type "ipconfig /all" to see your expiration time. If you use a router (preferred), look at the router's status page for the lease time it got from your ISP. Except my Linksys with Sveasoft firmware only shows the address it got, not the expiration time on the lease. So I don't know how Comcast has their DHCP server configured. :(

                      The only time I get a new address is when the ISP is radically changing its network, typically after an acquisition and merger.

                      But you're right in that once the address range gets oversubscribed, and your lease expires while you're not online, someone else will snatch up the available address and you'll get a new one the next time you connect. And under those conditions, the provider will set the lease times short (like an hour) to insure that they rapidly expire when people go offline. (There's a registry setting in Windows to make it give up its lease on shutdown, but it's off by default. So it holds its address until the lease expires or you explicitly release it with "ipconfig /release".)
                      Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                      snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                      Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

                        What's going to happen when we run out of IPv4 addresses?

                        For the majority of us, not a whole lot, actually.

                        First of all, what does "run out" mean? The only agencies who can actually be monitored are the five RIRs (regional internet registries), AfriNIC, APNIC, ARIN, LACNIC, and RIPE NCC. The address blocks are usually assigned in /22 blocks (1024 unique addresses ) and up, to LIRs (local internet registries), which would be your big upstream providers. How many unique IPs each LIR has remaining is very difficult to determine.

                        When your dynamic IP lease expires, the address does not go into the global RIR pool. It goes into your ISP's pool, which is quite often isn't even the LIR, and remains in the ISP's available IP reserve until it is allocated to another customer. The only time your ISP would need to acquire additional IP blocks is when it grew. The only time you'd run into problems as an existing customer is if, for some brain-addled reason, your ISP decided to acquire more always-on high-speed customers than it had available IPs. (can you say "breach of contract," folks? Thought you could)

                        Which is not to say the lack of new IPv4 addresses is a non-issue, or even a minor issue. As time goes by, the lack of new IPs will have massively debilitating effects on future growth of the internet. But there are ways to mitigate that. First of all, now that IPv4 addresses are no longer being viewed as essentially a limitless resource, organizations will actually start paying attention to what is using the resource up.

                        That five-year-old network printer in your office? Does it really need a globally unique IP? And if it has to be on the network, maybe it can get by with NATing, instead?

                        The RIRs are also likely to start assigning and allocating much smaller IP blocks, maybe as low as /24 (256 unique addresses), which will allow for much greater granularity and flexibility in use of what little address space we still have left.

                        So yes, a big deal, but no -- you aren't very likely to wake up one morning and find your favourite TG server offline due to lack of available IP addresses.
                        Last edited by Cheburash; 10-04-2010, 12:03 PM.




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                        <23:03:38> "|TG|Smachin<BF Admin>" was kicked from the server by "|TG-70th| Zhohar" (UNDERAGE ban.)
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                        • #13
                          Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

                          Originally posted by Cheburash View Post
                          The only time you'd run into problems as an existing customer is if, for some brain-addled reason, your ISP decided to acquire more always-on high-speed customers than it had available IPs. (can you say "breach of contract," folks? Thought you could)
                          They already put quotas on their "unlimited" data plans. So I'm sure they could get away with putting another quota on their "always on" feature.

                          That five-year-old network printer in your office? Does it really need a globally unique IP? And if it has to be on the network, maybe it can get by with NATing, instead?
                          Printers are rarely put out on the actual Internet using a public IP address now. So those aren't an issue. The issue is with devices that need a public address, like a cell phone, or any home device that needs to be accessed from outside. And the number of devices that could benefit from outside exposure is growing. Currently they have to use kludges to make themselves visible through a NAT firewall. (Think networked webcams, TiVo's that offer remote scheduling, IP telephony, and even peer-to-peer game servers (which are really just a variation on P2P file sharing).
                          Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                          snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                          Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

                            The below article actually is quite interesting.......and goes in line with my original post and the replies of other members.

                            Hackers waiting for IP addresses to run out
                            Cyber criminals are ready to pounce when current IPv4 web addresses run out and firms migrate to IPv6, a security firm warns.


                            By Tom Brewster, 13 Oct 2010 at 14:41
                            Hacker

                            UK businesses should prepare for the day when the current generation of IP addresses runs out as the shift to new systems could leave them open to attack.

                            This was the warning of MWR InfoSecurity, which has suggested the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority is running out of addresses that it can issue.

                            Hackers have been watching the situation closely and looking at ways they can exploit companies when firms have to link their old IPv4 systems with the new protocol IPv6.

                            “The UK will run out of addresses in the existing IPv4 system some time in the next 300 days and the rest of the world is not far behind,” explained Ian Shaw, managing director of InfoSecurity.

                            “Addresses will then have to be issued in a new protocol IPv6. The problem is that the old systems will not talk to the new ones and vice-versa easily. Firms will have to put in middlemen to link current and new systems and this will increase the risk of attack and business complication hugely."

                            Thus far only limited investment has gone into migration to the new address system and not many businesses have quite grasped the severity and proximity of the problem, according to Shaw.

                            “Now companies are going to have to invest heavily at a time when they can least afford to,” he added.

                            “If they don't, they risk losing day-to-day business to more nimble competitors and experience increased security incidents if they get the implementation wrong."

                            This is not the first time a warning has been put out over IPv4 addresses running out.

                            Two years ago, the so-called father of the internet Vint Cerf said the addresses would run out by 2010 and preparations needed to be made.

                            While his prediction may be just out, the time is evidently drawing nearer.
                            Randy = Ace ! - Warlab
                            Level II Volunteer FireFighter
                            Level I HazMat Technician
                            NYS EMT-B
                            Town of Mamaroneck Fire Dept.

                            sigpic




                            Bring On Project Reality 1.0!!!
                            RSS Feeds:Bamboo | | 9/11 - Never Forget |
                            Apophis - "TG was created to cater to a VERY specific type of gamer rather than trying to appeal to the greater gaming population.
                            Tactical Gamer is not mainstream.
                            We are not trying to attract mainstream gamers."

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: At long last, Obama highlights IPv6 issue

                              Link for above story:

                              http://www.itpro.co.uk/627655/hacker...ses-to-run-out
                              Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                              snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                              Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                              Comment

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