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  • Attack at Charlie Hebdo, Paris

    Undoubtedly people are aware of the attack carried out by two or three individuals in Paris at a Newspaper Office in Paris, France. A dozen people dead and many wounded in what was clearly an execution and is an attack against the freedom of speech. I had recently watched an interview done by Al Jazeera with Charlie Hebdo cartoonists on the subject of depicting the prophet muhammad where their 2012 running of satirical cartoons made much commotion.



    The biggest irony of the terrorist actions today, is that they have brought only more attention to what much of our world didn't care about. When you tell the free world what we can't do, we'll only do it more. So with that in mind I hope you all enjoy;




    "I'd rather die standing than live on my knees." - Stephane 'Charb'onnier


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  • #2
    Re: Attack at Charlie Hebdo, Paris

    Crusade when?
    Skud


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    • #3
      Re: Attack at Charlie Hebdo, Paris

      It is very interesting to see how some will defend the freedom of speech, but the instruments that will keep these freedoms free, we are trying to get rid of. Its difficult to keep freedom without the tools to secure them.

      |TG-IRR|

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      • #4
        Re: Attack at Charlie Hebdo, Paris

        The fallout from this attack is very muted and incredibly tolerant. Millions of people marched for the 17 who died and several who were injured over that last week around the world today. No talk of invasion or of revenge, just solidarity and justice where it is deserved.



        I've heard many people of late, from all sides say effectively the same thing; this is the new normal. Life in the 21st Century is currently defined not by any world war, thank god, but it is highlighted by pin-points of global terrorism. Much like the Spree Shooting in America, the threat of Terrorist Attacks will always be looming in this century.

        War has only helped to bring people into the arms of extremism. Extra security has worked but it wasn't what stopped the Christmas Day bomber, that was ineptitude. Action is required, don't get me wrong (for example I support the call for action in Syria, have for some time), but military action is a bandage not a solution - unless one fights to an absolute eradication. Its all about culture and society, much of the disillusionment can be traced to things before religion - religion is only a refuge.

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        • #5
          Re: Attack at Charlie Hebdo, Paris

          Uhhhh, I mean sure there's a lot of support for Charlie and such, but I think you're being mislead to believe that France's reaction is "Tolerant." The media is turning a blind eye to Jews feeling they are being the primary targets of recent attacks.

          France Considers Deploying Army to Protect Jewish Sites While European Jews Seek Gun Permits | TheBlaze.com
          Skud


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          • #6
            Re: Attack at Charlie Hebdo, Paris

            But Jews were not attacked at Charlie Hebdo, and though they were targeted in the Kosher food market the attacks in general targeted French society (western society) as a whole- for example in today's NYT was the following:

            "Mr. Merabet, 40, a police officer who was killed as he lay wounded on the ground, inspired a Twitter hastag, #JeSuisAhmed - I am Ahmed - as many praised him for defending a newspaper that was accused of insulting his Muslim faith. At a news conference relatives called him a pillar of their family. "My brother was Muslim, and he was killed by fake Muslims," Malek Merabet said. The family also urged people to "stop conflating things, triggering wars, burning mosques or synagogues."


            Antisemitism isn't being ignored by the media (but there is a greater movement of rexamination of the Israel-Palestinian dynamic), at least in my circles of news gathering which has reported everything from assaults on schools to synagogues, but its not the entire picture either. Either way a feeling of vulnerability and a desire for protection is not exactly an affront or an indication of intolerance.

            Though you are right that the solidarity march wont last forever and much of what happened last week has a lot longer shelf-life in the realm of public and political conversation, this morning in the NYT they had a good article which highlighted the role Ms. Le Pen, the face of the French National Front. She was the only notable exclusion from the unity march (and for good reasons as she herself operates on the politics of exclusion). She has a lot to gain from this, so too do many anti-immigration movements all across Europe.

            And still my point was that the far-right movements of Europe were not the ones to capitalize on this attack, and while they certainly have a lot to gain in the coming weeks and months, the immediate response after the criminals were dealt with was in fact tolerant and mournful. Who could have imagined Prime Minister Netanyahu a few paces right of President Mahmoud Abbas participating in the same march? In response to a jihadist assault?

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            • #7
              Re: Attack at Charlie Hebdo, Paris

              Actually, Yt, there is a lot of xenophobic sentiment in Europe right now. It isn't just anti-Muslim or Middle Eastern. Groups are trying to bring a nationalistic sense to a number of the countries and it seems that Russia is one of them, too. I can't help but think that this is viewed favorably by the lower people and an opportunity for a power grab by politicians, with the added chance to destabalize NATO and the EU. If the EU and NATO become unstable, the Western powers would be placed into a rather difficult position. Who would benefit?

              As time progresses, the influx of the incoming ideologies into Europe has left an impact and it was only a matter of time that a counter movement would take hold in the nations in Europe. No matter how "open minded' or 'open armed' a country claims to be, if they feel that their way of life is being threatened by a group of people, then they will have strife. What we are seeing now is that strife. It is only natural to see this conflict, but I personally see this as the little tendrils of something bigger. Is there a person, group, country, or organized thought process that controls this? I don't know.



              Interested in listening to guitar playing and a good conversation, look for me on TS.

              "Hope is for the weak. I hope for nothing. I work for things. That is the only way for events to unfold." -Cleverbot

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              • #8
                Re: Attack at Charlie Hebdo, Paris

                Hate mongers and xenophobes have existed in broad daylight in all societies in all countries. The problem isn't when people have the freedom to speak their hate; it is when the people do not have the freedom to escape the hate.

                I've heard of the massive troubles Europe has had in regards to its culture, immigration, and xenophobia. I don't remember when exactly it was but France was the scene of massive French-Arab riots maybe a decade back. The UK has its own issues, Germany has a growing Anti-Muslim movement (who go figure the leader paraded around as Hitler), and France has the National Front.

                But nationalism, xenophobia, and anti-immigration isn't new or unique to any area. Like you said Russia is trying to keep itself full of pride as it tries to consolidate the old 'empire' (though economic woes ruin chances), Israel is keeping the iron hot as it looks to further take more land from a people who don't even have their own nation (bitter irony), and the US has its own issues on FP and immigration as we all know (let alone a sense of national pride that catapulted us into decade long wars). And above all else we have radical jihadist islam, a movement without an explicit country and one that is as brutal as it is conservative and power-hungry.

                Either way you cut it, I feel as if the modern world, is undergoing a large scale-global-internet aided version of New York City's melting pot. It wasn't pretty then, and it didn't get fixed without strife and conflict. Heck its still not pretty, just less ugly. The 21st century moves fast for all of us, but culture is still a slow thing to change, hopefully we still have patience in an on-demand society.

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