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End-to-end BitTorrent Encryption

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  • End-to-end BitTorrent Encryption

    With the rollout of this low security modification to the major UI's written for the protocol responsible for the undisputed relative majority of internet traffic these days, those pesky ISPs and thier packet throttling silliness suffer a resounding blow. How many additional ms of lag do you think the rest of the internet is going to experience as a result of the return to the nostalgic days of unfettered BT-ness? Also the implications of a good 30% of internet traffic being encrypted as a result of this means that anonymous transmission/browsing just got a lot easier, as there is a veritable ocean of traffic to hide yor connection amongst. Interesting times, what?

    Later,
    helio

  • #2
    Re: End-to-end BitTorrent Encryption

    link?
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    • #3
      Re: End-to-end BitTorrent Encryption

      Heh, how pedestrian of me. Link-less is next to class-less or something. Here goes:

      Estimated BT traffic : more than a third of total internet traffic.

      Many ISP's Throttle BT traffic to near-zero speeds.

      Recent encryption mechanisms make it unfeasable to identify BT traffic (from the right clients) as such, crippling the filtering software. A better written peice than mine.

      Roadbump: Just had to elevate my post count up to 15 so I could actually share these. Lurking does have its drawbacks ...

      Later,
      helio

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      • #4
        Re: End-to-end BitTorrent Encryption

        I use BT for Linux distros-If I can't get decent bandwidth from work (which is rare) then BT it is. So I'm not concerned on iota about encryption, but I can see where it would be a good thing.

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        • #5
          Re: End-to-end BitTorrent Encryption

          The day will come when bandwidth will be a non-issue. The fight against online transmission of copyrighted media is futile. The best response, I think, is to quickly develop a better market for the purchase of media on-line as well as efforts to better blend the PC's interface with the television as a means to view digital content.

          As far as hopes of encrypted media bypassing traffic filters, think again. Often times these filters are designed to give preference and QoS to known/recognized transmissions. By making your traffic unidentifiable, you are almost guaranteed a lower class of service. So it may get around the block, but that Xkbps speed limit on unrecognized/encrypted flows won't get you anywhere fast.

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          • #6
            Re: End-to-end BitTorrent Encryption

            Originally posted by AMosely
            As far as hopes of encrypted media bypassing traffic filters, think again. Often times these filters are designed to give preference and QoS to known/recognized transmissions. By making your traffic unidentifiable, you are almost guaranteed a lower class of service. So it may get around the block, but that Xkbps speed limit on unrecognized/encrypted flows won't get you anywhere fast.
            The point is to bypass networks that recognizes and restricts bittorrent traffic. I've never heard of a consumer ISP that restricts unrecognized traffic to a limited bandwidth. Have you?

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            • #7
              Re: End-to-end BitTorrent Encryption

              Originally posted by RandomGuy
              The point is to bypass networks that recognizes and restricts bittorrent traffic. I've never heard of a consumer ISP that restricts unrecognized traffic to a limited bandwidth. Have you?
              Not yet. But then I'd never heard of an ISP blocking bittorrent traffic until recently.
              Peace through fear... since 1947!

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              • #8
                Re: End-to-end BitTorrent Encryption

                Originally posted by RandomGuy
                I've never heard of a consumer ISP that restricts unrecognized traffic to a limited bandwidth. Have you?
                Not ISP's, but colleges and universities, yes.

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                • #9
                  Re: End-to-end BitTorrent Encryption

                  Most IPS's equate BitTorrent = piracy, but thats not always ture. While it is used for that, it does have other, legimate, applications that make use of it. WoW's updater, for example. Should your ISP be able to foce you to resort to the FTP download of a new patch when BT would most likely be faster. Things like that are what I take exception to. Its also a sore spot that ISPs (most notably cable companies) advertise a certain speed, but if a substantial portion of its customers try to make use of the speed which they are paying for, the network gets overloaded.

                  As to the ISPs beingle able to filter encrypted traffic, I think it would be unfeaseable. The RC-4 encryption that BT is now using isn't very secure. It doesnt take much processing power to break. However, the sheer volume of packets means that the ISPs would need to spend money on machines to decrypt&identify traffic flowing thru its network, money which I hope they would instead spend on network upgrades to improve QoS for all traffic.

                  As to ISPs giving preferential treatment to certain types of traffic, there is now legislation being proposed to prohibit such behavior.

                  Later,
                  helio

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                  • #10
                    Re: End-to-end BitTorrent Encryption

                    I support the idea of preventing ISP's from changing their restrictions on-the-fly, but I also support their right to impose whatever restrictions they want when they sell the service. The result should be natural competition where some ISP's will restrict access and others will not.

                    Of course, paying by transfer volume would also solve this problem, but I'm hoping we don't see this anytime soon.
                    Peace through fear... since 1947!

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                    • #11
                      Re: End-to-end BitTorrent Encryption

                      Originally posted by icky
                      Of course, paying by transfer volume would also solve this problem, but I'm hoping we don't see this anytime soon.
                      No, and with bandwidth getting cheaper and cheaper, I don't see it ever happening...
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