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How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

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  • How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

    How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?
    • One to change the light bulb and to post that the light bulb has been changed.
    • Fourteen to share similar experiences of changing light bulbs and how the light bulb could have been changed differently.
    • Seven to caution about the dangers of changing light bulbs.
    • Seven more to point out spelling/grammar errors in posts about changing light bulbs.
    • Three to correct spelling/grammar errors.
    • Six to argue over whether it's "lightbulb" or "light bulb".
    • Another six to condemn those six as stupid.
    • Fifteen to claim experience in the lighting industry and give the correct spelling.
    • Nineteen to post that this group is not about light bulbs and to please take this discussion to a lightbulb (or light bulb) forum.
    • Eleven to defend the posting to the group saying that we all use light bulbs and therefore the posts are relevant to this group.
    • Thirty six to debate which method of changing light bulbs is superior, where to buy the best light bulbs, what brand of light bulbs work best for this technique and what brands are faulty.
    • Seven to post URLs where one can see examples of different light bulbs.
    • Four to post that the URLs were posted incorrectly and then post the corrected URL.
    • Three to post about links they found from the URLs that are relevant to this group which makes light bulbs relevant to this group.
    • Thirteen to link all posts to date, quote them in their entirety including all headers and signatures, and add "Me too".
    • Five to post to the group that they will no longer post because they cannot handle the light bulb controversy.
    • Four to say "didn't we go through this already a short time ago?"
    • Thirteen to say "do a Google search on light bulbs before posting questions about light bulbs."
    • Three to tell a funny story about their cat and a light bulb.
      AND
    • One group lurker to respond to the original post 6 months from now with something unrelated and start it all over again!

    [drill][medic][conduct][tg-c1][tpf-c1]
    [ma-c2][taw-c1]

    Principles of good Sandbox Etiquette:
    Assume good faith - Be polite, please! - Work toward agreement. - Argue facts, not personalities. - Concede a point when you have no response to it, or admit when you disagree based on intuition or taste. - Be civil. - Be prepared to apologize. In animated discussions, we often say things we later wish we hadn't. Say so. - Forgive and forget. - Recognize your own biases and keep them in check. - Give praise when due.

    Treat others as you would have them treat you

  • #2
    Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

    Pah ha ha ha!

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    • #3
      Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

      I'll bite. I changed one in the master bathroom last night. Out with the old, in with the new.
      Last edited by Bubba; 04-18-2006, 07:31 PM.


      18th SF Operational Detachment Delta

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      • #4
        Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

        While bathing?
        Peace through fear... since 1947!

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        • #5
          Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

          I bought a ton of lightbulbs last night at target....a lot are burned out in the house and I keep on forgetting to change them

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          • #6
            Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

            I just rewired my entire basement. Which included installing new light fixtures with new lightbulbs.

            [volun][drill]
            I'm cannon fodder.

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            • #7
              Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

              I just read a book... that has lightbulbs in it. Invisible Man. By Ralph Ellison. Not a lot of lightbulbs, per se, but some. More than your average book.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

                ... And so it begins.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

                  I'm looking to replace some of my household lightbulbs with LED lamps, but am having a difficult time finding them at reasonable prices. I'm not willing to pay $30 to replace a lightbulb, even if I'll likely never have to replace it again in my lifetime... Anyone have any recommendations?
                  Become a supporting member!
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                  • #10
                    Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

                    They do have some middle-ground level lightbulbs I believe, ... my mom recently replaced all the bulbs in our house with these energy efficient ones. They're about $3 a bulb but last around 5-7 years as opposed to the 2 yrs. that regular light bulbs are expected to last.

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                    • #11
                      Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

                      Dibs on the lurker role. ;>)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

                        Actualy I need some advise.

                        See, in my new house, no bedroom can fit all my stuff in it. So I'm living out in the garage. The lights out here lack shades, and the bulbs give off a TON of heat, so it's constantly really hot out here and I'm constantly sweating my ass off, etc. To top all this off, there is no vent, no fan, no windows, nothign.

                        Now, how can I fix this? What should I do? I've heard about special lightbulbs that put out like 60 watts of light (or whatever measurement that is), but only the heat of an equivalent 15. What's up with them? Any help would be appreciated here, I'm sick of burning my ass off.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

                          Originally posted by AzzMan
                          I've heard about special lightbulbs that put out like 60 watts of light (or whatever measurement that is), but only the heat of an equivalent 15. What's up with them? Any help would be appreciated here, I'm sick of burning my ass off.
                          You probably want to get yourself some micro-flourescents...they're called something like that. As I understand, it's not some much that they give off only 15 watts worth of heat, but they consume 15 watts of energy. Because they use a different mechanism to generate light, there is no hot filament, which means that while the light does generate some heat, it will be nowhere what you're used to from incandescents.

                          Cing, flourescents might be a good compromise for you as well. They cost more than standard bulbs, but not outrageously so (I consider $10 CDN for a 3 pack to be a good deal). They also have far better performance than incandescents. I don't know how they size up next to LED bulbs though. I imagine LEDs would emit fairly "cool" light (light which is very white, without the yellow hue of incandescents), and so the light from flourescents would likely be comparable.

                          That's all I've got.

                          [drill][medic][conduct][tg-c1][tpf-c1]
                          [ma-c2][taw-c1]

                          Principles of good Sandbox Etiquette:
                          Assume good faith - Be polite, please! - Work toward agreement. - Argue facts, not personalities. - Concede a point when you have no response to it, or admit when you disagree based on intuition or taste. - Be civil. - Be prepared to apologize. In animated discussions, we often say things we later wish we hadn't. Say so. - Forgive and forget. - Recognize your own biases and keep them in check. - Give praise when due.

                          Treat others as you would have them treat you

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?

                            I was thinking about putting a regular flourescent 4' tube fixture in the kitchen replacing a 2-bulb hanging fixture that generates way too little light and too much heat and uses too much electricity. Any tips for choice of fixtures? (I'd want something flush-mount.)
                            Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                            snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                            Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

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                            • #15
                              Re: How many forum members does it take to change a lightbulb?



                              The Bulb
                              Light bulbs have a very simple structure. At the base, they have two metal contacts, which connect to the ends of an electrical circuit. The metal contacts are attached to two stiff wires, which are attached to a thin metal filament. The filament sits in the middle of the bulb, held up by a glass mount. The wires and the filament are housed in a glass bulb, which is filled with an inert gas, such as argon.

                              When the bulb is hooked up to a power supply, an electric current flows from one contact to the other, through the wires and the filament. Electric current in a solid conductor is the mass movement of free electrons (electrons that are not tightly bound to an atom) from a negatively charged area to a positively charged area.

                              As the electrons zip along through the filament, they are constantly bumping into the atoms that make up the filament. The energy of each impact vibrates an atom -- in other words, the current heats the atoms up. A thinner conductor heats up more easily than a thicker conductor because it is more resistant to the movement of electrons.

                              Bound electrons in the vibrating atoms may be boosted temporarily to a higher energy level. When they fall back to their normal levels, the electrons release the extra energy in the form of photons. Metal atoms release mostly infrared light photons, which are invisible to the human eye. But if they are heated to a high enough level -- around 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit (2,200 degrees C) in the case of a light bulb -- they will emit a good deal of visible light.

                              The filament in a light bulb is made of a long, incredibly thin length of tungsten metal. In a typical 60-watt bulb, the tungsten filament is about 6.5 feet (2 meters) long but only one-hundredth of an inch thick. The tungsten is arranged in a double coil in order to fit it all in a small space. That is, the filament is wound up to make one coil, and then this coil is wound to make a larger coil. In a 60-watt bulb, the coil is less than an inch long.

                              Tungsten is used in nearly all incandescent light bulbs because it is an ideal filament material. In the next section, we'll find out why this is, and we'll examine the role of the glass bulb and inert gas.

                              As we saw in the last section, a metal must be heated to extreme temperatures before it will emit a useful amount of visible light. Most metals will actually melt before reaching such extreme temperatures -- the vibration will break apart the rigid structural bonds between the atoms so that the material becomes a liquid. Light bulbs are manufactured with tungsten filaments because tungsten has an abnormally high melting temperature.

                              But tungsten will catch on fire at such high temperatures, if the conditions are right. Combustion is caused by a reaction between two chemicals, which is set off when one of the chemicals has reached its ignition temperature. On Earth, combustion is usually a reaction between oxygen in the atmosphere and some heated material, but other combinations of chemicals will combust as well.

                              The filament in a light bulb is housed in a sealed, oxygen-free chamber to prevent combustion. In the first light bulbs, all the air was sucked out of the bulb to create a near vacuum -- an area with no matter in it. Since there wasn't any gaseous matter present (or hardly any), the material could not combust.

                              The problem with this approach was the evaporation of the tungsten atoms. At such extreme temperatures, the occasional tungsten atom vibrates enough to detach from the atoms around it and flies into the air. In a vacuum bulb, free tungsten atoms shoot out in a straight line and collect on the inside of the glass. As more and more atoms evaporate, the filament starts to disintegrate, and the glass starts to get darker. This reduces the life of the bulb considerably.

                              In a modern light bulb, inert gases, typically argon, greatly reduce this loss of tungsten. When a tungsten atom evaporates, chances are it will collide with an argon atom and bounce right back toward the filament, where it will rejoin the solid structure. Since inert gases normally don't react with other elements, there is no chance of the elements combining in a combustion reaction.

                              Cheap, effective and easy-to-use, the light bulb has proved a monstrous success. It is still the most popular method of bringing light indoors and extending the day after sundown. But by all indications, it will eventually give way to more advanced technologies, because it isn't very efficient.

                              Incandescent light bulbs give off most of their energy in the form of heat-carrying infrared light photons -- only about 10 percent of the light produced is in the visible spectrum. This wastes a lot of electricity. Cool light sources, such as fluorescent lamps and LEDs, don't waste a lot of energy generating heat -- they give off mostly visible light. For this reason, they are slowly edging out the old reliable light bulb.

                              Borrowed from: science.howstuffworks.com


                              18th SF Operational Detachment Delta

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