Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

    California Assemblywoman Lori Saldana could soon introduce a bill into state legislature that would halt companies like EA from including spyware technologies in their games. Battlefield 2142 has come under scrutiny for requiring players to install software that collects personal data from users' PCs and transfers it to foreign servers for advertising purposes. Consumers aren't warned of the adware application until opening the game box.

    Beth Givens of the Privacy Rights Clearinghouse calls EA's methods "particularly vile," prompting Saldana to consider legislation. "A parental notice telling them private information might be at risk is important to have," Saldana told a local news station.
    [source]
    |TG| Lorian
    Member since 18th February 2006


  • #2
    Re: Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

    hahaha...looks like its time for EA to get the shaft for a change. hopefully they get this through before valve decides to do the same thing with cs, as proposed.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

      THE worst thing about the adware is that it is inside the box....which means by the time you see it you cannot return the game.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

        Yea, it was like a "oh, NOW you tell me..." moment.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

          I'm still not a big fan of the government trying to regulate video games in any form. Although a voluntary warning by the publisher on the outside of the box would be a nice gesture.
          "No bastard ever won a war by dying for his country.
          He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country."

          - Attributed to General George Patton, Jr.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

            technically, if this attorney wins this case against EA, anyone who lives in california is eligible to file a class action lawsuit against them for damages lol!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

              Originally posted by Ferris Bueller View Post
              technically, if this attorney wins this case against EA, anyone who lives in california is eligible to file a class action lawsuit against them for damages lol!
              Be careful of what you ask; in the end, we might all pay (...more for our software).

              DB

              «That looks like a really nice house except for that horrible bathroom.» Donrhos

              | |





              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

                Originally posted by Ferris Bueller View Post
                technically, if this attorney wins this case against EA, anyone who lives in california is eligible to file a class action lawsuit against them for damages lol!
                Yep. And it will settle out of court, so somebody's attorney will make 20 million dollars, and everyone else involved in the lawsuit will get a coupon for 5 dollars off of a future EA game.
                ---
                Sources say the Dow Jones' decline is directly related to Dethklok front-man Nathan Explosion's constant deleting of potential new albums.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

                  What "personal data" is collected and sent back to EA for analysis?

                  I don't (nor does ISACA, from what I can tell based on materials I have from them) consider how long you've looked at an in-game billboard to be personal information. It's not personally identifiable, nor is it information that directly pertains to an individual identity.

                  I also love this "private information might be at risk" bit. You've got a greater likelihood of having your private information at risk using GMail, Hotmail, MySpace or any number of other web sites than you do playing anything in the Battlefield franchise.
                  Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

                    Originally posted by Apophis View Post
                    What "personal data" is collected and sent back to EA for analysis?

                    I don't (nor does ISACA, from what I can tell based on materials I have from them) consider how long you've looked at an in-game billboard to be personal information. It's not personally identifiable, nor is it information that directly pertains to an individual identity.

                    I also love this "private information might be at risk" bit. You've got a greater likelihood of having your private information at risk using GMail, Hotmail, MySpace or any number of other web sites than you do playing anything in the Battlefield franchise.
                    You've got a very valid point apophis, however, all it takes is some clever young buck to figure out a way to exploit the information gathering software embedded in the game as a means to gather his own variety of information.

                    For example: someone sets up a BF2142 server and over a couple months popularizes it. Then one day he injects his own clever creation and instantly has access to the personal information of any of the players that are on his server. From this end, peoples identities could be stolen and EA would ultimately be held accountable by any respectable attorney as the facilitator of this tragedy. Sure, the kid who did it would be punished appropriately, but seeing as EA was responsible for intentionally creating the loophole which was exploited to such an end, they'd pay big time.

                    This is why microsoft is so quick to distribute security updates for components they designed into windows that have holes. If they didnt, they'd lose their shorts. EA obviously never thought of this.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

                      Originally posted by Ferris Bueller View Post
                      You've got a very valid point apophis, however, all it takes is some clever young buck to figure out a way to exploit the information gathering software embedded in the game as a means to gather his own variety of information.
                      I understand your point, but I think the same applies to any software application. What's stopping someone from modifying the code for a Neverwinter Nights 2 server and compromising a client machine and getting it to send data other than the intended bits back to the host? There are an enormous amount of software applications that could be compromised to send personally identifiable information to a remote site that have nothing to do with advertising systems.

                      Originally posted by Ferris Bueller View Post
                      This is why microsoft is so quick to distribute security updates for components they designed into windows that have holes. If they didnt, they'd lose their shorts. EA obviously never thought of this.
                      Microsoft is well known in security circles for only patching well known and published security holes. Quite a number of relatively serious vulnerabilities go un-patched because they are not well known. Microsoft is probably a poor example, but I do get your point. I don't think there's enough evidence to say that EA doesn't take the security of their advertising system seriously.

                      If a vulnerability is disclosed and they fail to patch it, then you'll have the evidence needed to say they're not thinking about security.
                      Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

                        My concern is not someone hacking the system. It's EA or another publisher surreptitiously using their software to acess other information in my system. I just don't trust them.
                        "No bastard ever won a war by dying for his country.
                        He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country."

                        - Attributed to General George Patton, Jr.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Joystiq: EA's "spyware" targeted by CA lawmaker

                          Originally posted by Evo<^|SiNz|^> View Post
                          My concern is not someone hacking the system. It's EA or another publisher surreptitiously using their software to acess other information in my system. I just don't trust them.
                          I can understand that, but you still run software that talks over the Internet. How can you be sure that other games or applications aren't doing this behind your back with absolutely no disclosure?

                          When I run strange apps, I often fire up Ethereal in the background to record all the traffic sent and received so I can get an idea what type of "phone home" data is being sent. I don't normally do this with games though.

                          I know a lot of people dislike EA and assume everything they do is somehow going to be bad, intrusive, illegal, etc. But what sets EA apart from other publishers/developers?
                          Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Joystiq: EA's &quot;spyware&quot; targeted by CA lawmaker

                            Originally posted by Apophis View Post
                            I can understand that, but you still run software that talks over the Internet. How can you be sure that other games or applications aren't doing this behind your back with absolutely no disclosure?

                            When I run strange apps, I often fire up Ethereal in the background to record all the traffic sent and received so I can get an idea what type of "phone home" data is being sent. I don't normally do this with games though.

                            I know a lot of people dislike EA and assume everything they do is somehow going to be bad, intrusive, illegal, etc. But what sets EA apart from other publishers/developers?
                            In this case you have to trust
                            1. EA, a games company who's motives I can compare to other game companies
                            2. IGA Worldwide, an advertising company who's motives don't compare to game companies. Their motives are more comparable to 180Solutions, Comet Cursor, Bonzi Buddy, Gator... (a bit harsh but you get the point).

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Joystiq: EA's &quot;spyware&quot; targeted by CA lawmaker

                              Originally posted by RandomGuy View Post
                              In this case you have to trust
                              1. EA, a games company who's motives I can compare to other game companies
                              2. IGA Worldwide, an advertising company who's motives don't compare to game companies. Their motives are more comparable to 180Solutions, Comet Cursor, Bonzi Buddy, Gator... (a bit harsh but you get the point).
                              Good point. I really haven't researched much about IGA and their advertising practices. Something I should probably do. Although, I do agree that comparing them to Bonzi Buddy is a bit harsh. :)

                              I'm also curious if IGA has direct access to the code itself or if they are only provided the data that EA provides. If EA is in full control of the advertising code and the data retreived, I wouldn't have an issue with it.
                              Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

                              Comment

                              Connect

                              Collapse

                              TeamSpeak 3 Server

                              Collapse

                              Advertisement

                              Collapse

                              Twitter Feed

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X