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  • Facts , Interesting ?

    http://glumbert.com:80/media/shift
    I want all those who get to know me
    To become admirers or my enemies

  • #2
    Re: Facts , Interesting ?

    I find it interesting that they say that the ability to exceed the computational speeds of the human brain is still a few years off. Last time I checked, most people are incapable of doing tens of millions of mathematical computations per second. As far as data absorbtion, theres no equivalent to the human brain, but thats simply due to the diverse nature of information we can store. Regardless of what the computational power of a computer is, until it has the ability to understand and process in meaningful terms the things we take for granted through our five basic senses, they will never be able to compete in the operational resources that humans possess. Perhaps someday, but not now and not for some time to come.

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    • #3
      Re: Facts , Interesting ?

      That was...really boring. 5 minutes of random useless statistics. I wouldn't have watched it at all except I wanted to find out what Ferris was talking about re: a computer surpassing the human brain.

      A human brain does not have the linear processing power that a computer does, to do the same task repeatedly very quickly--but it has a lot of parallel processing power. While one brain area is performing one type of task, another area is performing another task, at the same time as 58 other areas are performing 58 other tasks, yielding a fairly impressive end result. That said, I couldn't say whether that end result is actually more powerful than modern supercomputers or not.

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      • #4
        Re: Facts , Interesting ?

        I found that really interesting. The underlying message (for me) is a comment on how expansive the sea of information we live is actually is, and how it is getting bigger and things are moving faster than we can even conceive of. As the vid says: we are living in exponential times.

        Actually, the part that I found most interesting was the claim that our young people are currently studying to do jobs that don't exist, using technologies that haven't been invented yet. That impresses the heck out of me.

        For interested parties, see the wikipedia article on the Singularity.

        Originally posted by Wikipedia
        The Technological Singularity is the hypothesized creation, usually via AI or brain-computer interfaces, of smarter-than-human entities who rapidly accelerate technological progress beyond the capability of human beings to participate meaningfully in said progress.

        [drill][medic][conduct][tg-c1][tpf-c1]
        [ma-c2][taw-c1]

        Principles of good Sandbox Etiquette:
        Assume good faith - Be polite, please! - Work toward agreement. - Argue facts, not personalities. - Concede a point when you have no response to it, or admit when you disagree based on intuition or taste. - Be civil. - Be prepared to apologize. In animated discussions, we often say things we later wish we hadn't. Say so. - Forgive and forget. - Recognize your own biases and keep them in check. - Give praise when due.

        Treat others as you would have them treat you

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        • #5
          Re: Facts , Interesting ?

          I have to say, that had me completely awestruck.

          Originally posted by Diceman View Post
          we are living in exponential times.
          what does that mean?

          Originally posted by Diceman View Post
          Actually, the part that I found most interesting was the claim that our young people are currently studying to do jobs that don't exist, using technologies that haven't been invented yet. That impresses the heck out of me.
          Singularity.
          we are?

          Cool!! :D
          <<<<Magic!!




          -F- Concr3te: "Brutus, goddammit, shut up!"

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          • #6
            Re: Facts , Interesting ?

            Originally posted by HBrutusH View Post
            what does that mean?
            Exponential times, as I understand it, mainly relates to the volume of information that we create, use and store, and the speed at which we process it. That may seem like a minor thing to define "the times" with, but information actually underlies everything we do as a society these days. Consider that computers are simply information appliances, and then consider everything that we put computers into these days: planes, cars, malls, homes, even running shoes. All these things become information-driven themselves.

            Note that one of the stated goals of companies like Google is to index all human knowledge. All of it. Anything ever known by any one. Or the example of Wikipedia, and similar efforts, which represent a previously impossible method to collect, organize and distribute yet more information. Look at Web 2.0 in general, and see that, online at least, people are organizing themselves in ways which shifts content production from the few to the many - examples include blogs, Youtube, and iTunes (representing the microchunking of media). People are learning how to microchunk in different areas as well: money and war.

            It is a shifting of power and control downwards - the common person has more power and information than s/he has had available ever in human history. All of it is facilitated by the information and computers. As our computers expand in capacity according to Moore's law (and soon, quantum computing), our society moves at exponential speeds.
            Last edited by Diceman; 08-01-2007, 06:33 PM. Reason: Changed unbundle to read as microchunk

            [drill][medic][conduct][tg-c1][tpf-c1]
            [ma-c2][taw-c1]

            Principles of good Sandbox Etiquette:
            Assume good faith - Be polite, please! - Work toward agreement. - Argue facts, not personalities. - Concede a point when you have no response to it, or admit when you disagree based on intuition or taste. - Be civil. - Be prepared to apologize. In animated discussions, we often say things we later wish we hadn't. Say so. - Forgive and forget. - Recognize your own biases and keep them in check. - Give praise when due.

            Treat others as you would have them treat you

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Facts , Interesting ?

              Interesting stuff, though it would have been faster to just read on a page. And it was somewhat anti-climactic. "Shift happens"? What is that about?
              |TG| Lorian
              Member since 18th February 2006

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              • #8
                Re: Facts , Interesting ?

                I'm not sure how they are comparing the computational speeds of a digital computer with a brain. While Kero is right that a brain does not work like a single high speed digital computer, it also does not work like 60 or however many digital computers in parallel.

                We know how digital computers work. It's not so clear how the brain works, but we have lots of evidence that it's a kind of neural network. We know how to model artificial neural networks (ANN). We know that digital computers and ANNs are different kinds of machines. It's really not clear how to compare the computing power of a neural network with a digital computer. They compute in completely different ways. Currently, we have no ANNs that are nearly as complex as a human brain.

                I also agree with Kero that the video really just contained some boring statistics. Our reactions are easily fooled by large numbers. For example, take a plain piece of paper and fold it in half. Now, go ask your friends how thick they think the paper will be if you kept folding this paper in half 60 times. Don't let them get out a calculator to calculate or anything. Just ask them to intuit how think the paper will be. You have to get them to imagine that you actually can do so, since it's physically impossible. Or, you can rephrase it as cutting the paper in half and stacking the halves on top of each other. I do this with my students and the typical response is somewhere between 6 inches and a foot. Some more thoughtful students might guess a couple of feet. What it shows, I think, is that our intuitions about large numbers are really terrible, and so while some of the statistics in the video seem kind of shocking at first, they really aren't once you really start thinking about it.

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