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Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

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  • Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

    I had just finished reading the NY Time's editorial about the disenfranchisement of felons who have "paid their debt to society" when I read this article about another felon in the process of paying his debt.

    http://www.democratandchronicle.com/...61H_news.shtml

  • #2
    Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

    Originally posted by leejo
    I had just finished reading the NY Time's editorial about the disenfranchisement of felons who have "paid their debt to society" when I read this article about another felon in the process of paying his debt.

    http://www.democratandchronicle.com/...61H_news.shtml

    well the question has to be asked how serious a crime must you commit before you are not allowed to vote?


    www.TeamElement.com

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    • #3
      Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

      A felony is whatever a legislature decides is one, but they are generally more serious crimes. Misdemeanors are less serious crimes like public intoxication, prostitution, even driving under the influence, or assault and battery can be misdemeanors. Burglaries, repeat DUI offenses, and violent crimes, and lots of drug-related crimes (other than simple posession, etc) are generally felonies.

      In any case, a duly-elected legislature would have passed the law and the state or federal executive would have signed the law establishing the penalties for the crime prior to its commission and the person's conviction. Done deal, and tres democratique!

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      • #4
        Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

        I don't understand what that article has to do with the topic of this thread... Denying convicted felons the right to vote has long been one of the understandings of our democratic society. Yes, they're still citizens, but they are indeed, and should be, denied certain things that are the right of law abiding citizens. Like it or not, the Constitution was written to allow for the three branches of our government to interpret, change and restrict it. It's a wonderful system...
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        • #5
          Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

          Is Ken Lay still allowed a vote?
          Jex.

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          • #6
            Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

            Ken Lay hasn't been convicted of a crime, so yes he can vote unless and until he's convicted of a felony. Andrew Fastow has been convicted of a felony and so cannot vote when he gets out of prison.

            Maybe all the felons who want to vote should get some candy while Ken Lay still gets to vote? Hmm?

            Cing I read the article almost immediately after reading the NY Times's op-ed piece about how poor felons are disenfranchised. It has nothing to do with the topic of the thread except that he's been convicted of a felony. Presumably, were he to get out on parole and wanted to vote, the NY Times would rally behind his cause.

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            • #7
              Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

              Originally posted by leejo
              Ken Lay hasn't been convicted of a crime, so yes he can vote unless and until he's convicted of a felony. Andrew Fastow has been convicted of a felony and so cannot vote when he gets out of prison.

              Maybe all the felons who want to vote should get some candy while Ken Lay still gets to vote? Hmm?

              Cing I read the article almost immediately after reading the NY Times's op-ed piece about how poor felons are disenfranchised. It has nothing to do with the topic of the thread except that he's been convicted of a felony. Presumably, were he to get out on parole and wanted to vote, the NY Times would rally behind his cause.
              hold on a second. the NY times would be behind the ****ing raping fathers right to vote after he let three men rape his 3 yr old.

              ffs what is the world comming too, that is disgustiong.


              www.TeamElement.com

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              • #8
                Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

                nono you don't understand. Once he's "paid his debt to society" we should feel sorry for him and want to help him.

                The NY Times discusses felons' disenfranchisement, points out the fact that it disproportionately affects black people, mentions that Katherine Harris embarked on an effort to purge FL's voter lists of felons, and says that traditionally Republicans have sought to keep felons from voting and have suppressed efforts to revise the law such that convicted felons can vote.

                They make no effort to discuss the crimes these people committed and I doubt the will.

                Personally, I'd be willing to let them vote in exchange for ....maybe an extra 5 years in the can? I wonder how many takers I'd get.

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                • #9
                  Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

                  Originally posted by leejo
                  nono you don't understand. Once he's "paid his debt to society" we should feel sorry for him and want to help him.

                  The NY Times discusses felons' disenfranchisement, points out the fact that it disproportionately affects black people, mentions that Katherine Harris embarked on an effort to purge FL's voter lists of felons, and says that traditionally Republicans have sought to keep felons from voting and have suppressed efforts to revise the law such that convicted felons can vote.

                  They make no effort to discuss the crimes these people committed and I doubt the will.

                  Personally, I'd be willing to let them vote in exchange for ....maybe an extra 5 years in the can? I wonder how many takers I'd get.

                  no bloody way and you have hit something on the head there.

                  since september 11 the home office in the UK has said that the stop and searches of asisan males of about 18-25 has gone up by 30% or something like that. and there were people eveerywhere calling the police racist. to which Mr Blunket said (the home secretary) if september 11th had been committed by ginger headed scotssman in kilts, then the number of ginger headed scotsman in kilts being stopped and searched would have risen.

                  the idea that you should relax that law because it affects alot of black males is an even worse notion than the first. if the crime that is being committed is being done so disproportionatly by the Black male then they shall pay just the same as any white or asian guy would have to should they choose to commit crimes. lets not forget as pointed out before that felony is not a minor crime.

                  so if they choose to committ thises heavy crimes then they can pay the crime and the only reason its disproportionate is because the Black males are the ones doing the crime. ( im not saying all black people are criminals so you can shut up before you call me a racist. but if they are convicted it isnt anyones thought but themselves, and the whole race issue would not have been brought up if it wasnt for the loud mouth trying to reverse the law)


                  www.TeamElement.com

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                  • #10
                    Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

                    I wonder, what happened to paying ones debt to society. I can see the forfieture of rights during incarceration, but after? can't say I agree.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

                      In theory, when someone is released from prison they have reformed their way of life such that they are ready to re-enter society as a lawful and contributing member. As such, I feel they should certainly be allowed to vote. That sick ---- in the article posted hopefully will not be free until he's 88, at which time he's not necessarily going to be in any shape to actually put forth the effort to vote. Look at how many healthy, young, and opinionated people don't vote now.

                      If people are not responsible and reformed when they leave prison, that's a problem with the prison system and not with the laws that govern felons who have finished serving their sentences, since they shouldn't BE felonious anymore. That's a different topic.

                      Idealism aside, the cynical point of view also says released felons should be allowed to vote, because who wants to go back to being a contributing member of society when you get all the work and none of the benefits? Who wants to stay lawful when the law is still punishing long after you've returned to a lawful way of life?

                      My personal feeling is that felons gave up their freedoms when they committed a crime against someone else's freedoms, but for the less outrageous and unrepeated felonies this loss should be temporary. Hold out the carrot of a return to freedoms for good behavior instead of permanently brandishing the stick. Yes, a lot of people will misuse their freedom and have it taken away again, but there's still a portion (possibly a minority?) who deserve to have their freedoms restored because they really did reform. While I agree with leejo that felons have to earn freedom back, I don't think extra prison time is needed since the original prison sentence is supposed to have already taken all that earning into account.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

                        Originally posted by NewsWrthy
                        I wonder, what happened to paying ones debt to society. I can see the forfieture of rights during incarceration, but after? can't say I agree.
                        Part of the debt to society is the loss of voting rights. Other crimes are serious enough for one to lose life!

                        These penalties have been decided by the people through their legislators, and it's been this way since the days of our founding fathers. Hell, it goes way back to Rome and has been carried down through british common law, etc.

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                        • #13
                          Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

                          Originally posted by leejo
                          Part of the debt to society is the loss of voting rights. Other crimes are serious enough for one to lose life!

                          These penalties have been decided by the people through their legislators, and it's been this way since the days of our founding fathers. Hell, it goes way back to Rome and has been carried down through british common law, etc.
                          Not allowed owning guns either once convicted. I wonder if we should allow that as well?

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                          • #14
                            Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

                            hmm good point. They HAVE paid their debt.

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                            • #15
                              Re: Should "former" felons be allowed to vote?

                              Originally posted by leejo
                              Part of the debt to society is the loss of voting rights. Other crimes are serious enough for one to lose life!
                              OK, then. That certainly puts perspective on the very serious felonies and repeat offenders. I will agree that felonies such as treason should definitely end in permanent loss of voting rights. But the felony of opening someone else's mail I think a person could repent and recover from, and shouldn't cause a permanent loss of voting rights. I think that owning a gun after a felony should be allowed if the (single) felony wasn't a crime relating to causing physical harm (no violent crime offenders).

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