Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

    As some of you may know, the "real ID" act is now law which goes into effect in 2008. It does away with state ID/drivers licenses and replaces them with a nationwide RFID enabled card complete with some form of biometric identification. This card will be required to apply for a job (which you already need an ID in order to do), use any government run service, and, possibly at any POS (point of sale) retailer that has an age restriction, for instance liquor stores or bars.

    Now, an id card by itself is not a very threatening idea. But as it is, our various forms of identification and accounting (credit cards, id cards, HMO cards) are seperate. This prevents us from being easily tracked, but with one single card being used for all forms of identification, it makes it significantly easier for us to be identified and tracked by anyone with the ability to recall records of where that card was used.

    A little primer on RFID:

    RFID stands for radio frequency identification. You know those sticky labels with a weird metallic track that you sometimes find on certain products in stores after you take it home? Thats RFID, but a slightly less applicable form of it. They are being replaced with identifable RFID, which is item-level tagging. Essentially, it gives every single RFID tag a unique number which allows it to be tracked through manufacture up to the point that it leaves the store. If you shop at walmart, within the next year every single thing you buy there will have RFID tracking at some level. It may not be item level (as in each pair of jeans you buy there has an unique RFID tag), but some companies do sell products with RFID tags built into the product itself, not even just the packaging. This is mostly done with clothing, jeans for instance. RFID is at a very rapid place replacing barcodes in every industry.

    RFID is also used in living things. It first began this route in pets as a more effective way of returning lost pets to their caretakers. Now it is being used as an implantable identification device in humans, the forerunner of this application of RFID is the verichip corporation.

    This video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-PIyL3ke24 shows, albeit in a biased way what the verichip is and what its implications are.

    But, the national ID cards have this exact same technology built into the cards. This technology has already been exploited and cloned using simple consumer available scanners.

    Consider if you will this scenario. You decide to go to the mall today. You walk out of the house and board the local mass transit bus, which has an rfid scanner built into the cash taking machine. Your card's ID is silently recorded, which tied to the mass transit customer database which you signed up for, thinking how convenient it would be to not have to even take your wallet out when you get on the bus, allows them to bill your credit card for the trips you take. You get off the bus at the mall, and proceed to wander around, window shopping. In every store there are several scanners used for bill paying and to keep track of inventory for security purposes. Each time you get within range of these scanners, your card may be silently scanned and recorded. Law enforcement may easily check and have a detailed list of every single scan on your ID and effectively discover all of your movements, every store you went to. Now, this scenario probably wouldn't occur for in such a pervasive way for another 2-3 years, but its already in the works.

    The violation of privacy is absolute, in my opinion, with this system of identification.

    What do you think?

    for more reading:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/VeriChip
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/REAL_ID


    edit: damnit, theres already several threads on this.. shoulda searched first. But mine does include some extra information that the others don't
    http://www.tacticalgamer.com/search.php?searchid=684181

  • #2
    Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

    An excerpt from Wired's article "The Eternal Value of Privacy".

    Originally posted by Wired
    The most common retort against privacy advocates -- by those in favor of ID checks, cameras, databases, data mining and other wholesale surveillance measures -- is this line: "If you aren't doing anything wrong, what do you have to hide?"

    Some clever answers: "If I'm not doing anything wrong, then you have no cause to watch me." "Because the government gets to define what's wrong, and they keep changing the definition." "Because you might do something wrong with my information." My problem with quips like these -- as right as they are -- is that they accept the premise that privacy is about hiding a wrong. It's not. Privacy is an inherent human right, and a requirement for maintaining the human condition with dignity and respect.

    Two proverbs say it best: Quis custodiet custodes ipsos? ("Who watches the watchers?") and "Absolute power corrupts absolutely."

    Cardinal Richelieu understood the value of surveillance when he famously said, "If one would give me six lines written by the hand of the most honest man, I would find something in them to have him hanged." Watch someone long enough, and you'll find something to arrest -- or just blackmail -- with. Privacy is important because without it, surveillance information will be abused: to peep, to sell to marketers and to spy on political enemies -- whoever they happen to be at the time.

    Privacy protects us from abuses by those in power, even if we're doing nothing wrong at the time of surveillance.

    [drill][medic][conduct][tg-c1][tpf-c1]
    [ma-c2][taw-c1]

    Principles of good Sandbox Etiquette:
    Assume good faith - Be polite, please! - Work toward agreement. - Argue facts, not personalities. - Concede a point when you have no response to it, or admit when you disagree based on intuition or taste. - Be civil. - Be prepared to apologize. In animated discussions, we often say things we later wish we hadn't. Say so. - Forgive and forget. - Recognize your own biases and keep them in check. - Give praise when due.

    Treat others as you would have them treat you

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

      Isn't the issue here that RFID could become a big issue if the government started asking for all of our credit card numbers? I mean considering how wonderful a job they do on keeping our social security numbers safe...it is hardly a tracking mechanism.

      Also

      How about I just wrap my card in tin foil until I need to use it?

      Also

      RFID is also printable, so if it is on the outside expect it to be scratched off a lot by "accident".

      Oh and regardless of that, expect a considerable amount of the under 21 population to "vanish" when some black market operation starts printing custom RFIDs. The card can't "lie" can it? So why would Joe Shmoe the liquor store owner bother to read what is written or even check the picture? He doesn't have to, it got scanned from 2 feet away. It isn't his fault either, the card told him all the correct information.

      -Zephyr
      You were once like the newbie who needed a hand from above and TacticalGamer gave you it.

      You owe the newbie who comes after you that same outstretched hand from above on your honor as a Tactical Gamer.

      Tactics at TG come from trust and friendship, not meticulous detail and rigid discipline.

      Everyone should be assumed mature until proven otherwise.

      We are no clan.
      We are not a single game.
      We are mature, intelligent, and cooperative individuals.
      We are TacticalGamer, a community above and beyond its name.

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

        Originally posted by mentholated View Post
        As some of you may know, the "real ID" act is now law which goes into effect in 2008. It does away with state ID/drivers licenses and replaces them with a nationwide RFID enabled card complete with some form of biometric identification. [/url]
        Actually it creates a standard for state issued licenses, not an actual nationwide card. The nationwide card with biometric information (a picture) is called a passport.

        The REAL ID is just a set of specific requirements the states are supposed to put into their state ID's. There is a difference. That said, the only issue with RFID is the ease of reading the info. RFID is a bar code that can be read remotely (and generally a very short distance away). The info included will be the same as on the magnetic strip of most driver's licenses, which is the same info as printed on the front of the card. RFID just makes it easier to access, although if it is passive you can simply get a wallet that has shielding so it cannot be read without being removed.

        The real problem with the act is that it requires states to enact changes to their card without funding those requirements, and is part of an act called "Emergency Supplemental Appropriations Act for Defense, the Global War on Terror, and Tsunami Relief, 2005". The problem is that those three things have nothing to do with each other and should not be passed as a group. Defense is against an enemy army, terrorism is a load of crap to scare people and the Tsunami is not an act or war or terror, simply nature. None of these three things have anything to do with identifying citizens unless the government is trying to do the terrorizing of the citizens, in which case Mission Accomplished.
        |TG-6th|Snooggums

        Just because everyone does something does not mean that it is right to do.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

          Robert Heinlein was a brilliant man and proved it many times through the words of on of his biggest characters, Lazarus Long. Here is his take on the issue:
          Originally posted by Lazarus Long
          When a place gets crowded enough to require ID's, social collapse is not far away. It is time to go elsewhere. The best thing about space travel is that it made it possible to go elsewhere.
          Unfortunately, we dont have real space travel yet. If we did, i'd be elsewhere by now, digging turnips on mars or some other far off hunk of rock. I dont like where our society is headed if it continues on its present course, havent liked it for a long time. This little debacle is just another example of why.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

            I think this issue was pretty well summed up in the Idiocracy movie. I recommend everyone to watch this movie to gain new perspective on identification technology.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

              http://www.theonion.com/content/amvo...s_surveillance (NSFW)
              The trouble with the world is that the stupid are cocksure and the intelligent are full of doubt. ~
              I have a tendency to key out three or four things and then let them battle for supremacy while I key, so there's a lot of backspacing as potential statements are slaughtered and eaten by the victors. ~
              Feel free to quote me. ~

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

                RealID, RFID..... Whatever. It is just wrong. Very, horribly wrong.

                The wrongness started with the Social Security Number. And it wasn't the SSN itself that was wrong. It was how it came to be used. The SSN is probably one of the biggest boondoggles simply because everybody puts so much trust in it.

                When you go into a bank for a loan do they ever check up on your references? No. Do they rely on your actual history with the institution? No. They don't care that you have never had a bounced check or have paid off every other loan with them on time. All they care about is that silly credit report that came back from the nether.

                The REALID and all the crap that will be tied to it will only worsen the situation. The person is being supplanted by the abstracted representation summarized by a series of digits.

                As Diceman pointed out, we are being controlled by the powers because the thing that makes up "we" is disappearing. The humanness is being replaced by numbers. Numbers that can be manipulated and moved and shunted out of the mainstream when it becomes neccessary. Privacy is not important because numbers have no need of privacy.
                Iím not racists, I have republican friends. Radio show host.
                - "The essence of tyranny is the denial of complexity". -Jacob Burkhardt
                - "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds" - Emerson
                - "People should not be afraid of it's government, government should be afraid of it's People." - Line from V for Vendetta
                - If software were as unreliable as economic theory, there wouldn't be a plane made of anything other than paper that could get off the ground. Jim Fawcette
                - "Let me now state what seems to me the decisive objection to any conservatism which deserves to be called such. It is that by its very nature it cannot offer an alternative to the direction in which we are moving." -Friedrich Hayek
                - "Don't waist your time on me your already the voice inside my head." Blink 182 to my wife

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

                  I'm strongly opposed to adding another layer of tracking in an already strong surveillance society. If there happens to be an occasion where law enforcement needs to seriously track an individual, they should get a warrant and start looking for traceable actions/events. Theres no good reason to intrude on ones privacy by requiring citizens to own ID transponders that give away their daily routine.

                  Worse yet, the 'patriot act' already gives government carte blanc to do surveillance and spying that is wholesale illegal. Citizens of the US are being lulled into a police state and many are all too happy to allow it since they believe that jesus elected the president and therefor government can do no wrong.
                  |TG|Switch

                  Better known as:
                  That noob who crashed the chopper.
                  That noob who ran over the mine.
                  That noob who TK'd me with a sniper rifle.
                  That noob who hit that APC at 300m with light AT! Our APC...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

                    An organization that opposes Real ID, has prepared legislation to require that Congress read the bills it tries to pass and provide a waiting period before voting on them, and some to require that Congress, not appointed bureacracies, be the only ones who can write Federal law:

                    http://DownsizeDC.org/

                    It's next project is a law to require Congress to have only one issue per bill.
                    Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                    snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                    Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

                      What's to stop someone from cloning my RFID? I could get close to a public official, clone his tag, then go cruising the gay porn bars. Well, anywhere but in San Francisco, as that's where our city government hangs out anyway after work. ;)

                      The ideal defense is to copy my tag many times and for me and my friends to all walk around with copies of each others' tags. (The tags need not look like cards, and could be concealed in some other item.)
                      Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                      snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                      Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

                        The future is catching up, I remember when RFID was just a thing of scifi movies, I like it to have on my pets maybe children but I just don't know with the Big Brother government watching? Better security? More insecurity?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

                          Originally posted by ScratchMonkey View Post
                          What's to stop someone from cloning my RFID? I could get close to a public official, clone his tag, then go cruising the gay porn bars. Well, anywhere but in San Francisco, as that's where our city government hangs out anyway after work. ;)

                          The ideal defense is to copy my tag many times and for me and my friends to all walk around with copies of each others' tags. (The tags need not look like cards, and could be concealed in some other item.)
                          Encryption.

                          Data on RFID chips CAN be encrypted. Logic can be implemented within RFID that allows for temporary termination of the chip's response after 'x' invalid authentication attempts.

                          Granted, not all RFID products USE this technology, but it is there and certainly available. As for protection of RFID, there are a wide number of products that can be used to prevent someone from reading RFID out of your wallet. There are simple things such as little Tyvek sleeves (like your ATM card came in) impregnated with aluminum on the outer layer, to rather nice leather wallets lined with RF shielding.

                          If you want to play around with RFID; here's a good reader to play with.
                          http://omnikey.aaitg.com/fileadmin/D...atasheet_E.pdf
                          Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

                            RFID technology similar to VeriChip is being used at a number of resorts. Rather than carrying around a credit card or a resort-issued ID card to pay for drinks and services, you get the chip implanted in less than a minute and can not pay for those same drinks and services with a wave of your newly chip-emplanted hand.

                            I love the idea. If the technology to encrypt and protect the ID string on the chip was designed properly AND if excess data wasn't stored on the chip that wasn't needed for back-end identification and billing, I would *LOVE* this for normal everyday use. No more carrying credit/debit cards or cash around. No more carrying ID.

                            I would love a consumer configurable way to add extra data to the chip in a separate partition (maybe even accessed by a separate frequency) that would allow for the exchange of data between two RFID enabled individuals. It would be interesting to be able to go to a business meeting, shake the hand of the guy you're meeting with and instantly exchange contact information that you can then download into your PDA, smart phone, Outlook or whatever.
                            Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: National ID or "How I learned to stop fearing RFID and love the chip"

                              Originally posted by Apophis
                              Data on RFID chips CAN be encrypted. Logic can be implemented within RFID that allows for temporary termination of the chip's response after 'x' invalid authentication attempts.

                              Granted, not all RFID products USE this technology, but it is there and certainly available.
                              Originally posted by Apophis View Post
                              If the technology to encrypt and protect the ID string on the chip was designed properly AND if excess data wasn't stored on the chip that wasn't needed for back-end identification and billing, I would *LOVE* this for normal everyday use. No more carrying credit/debit cards or cash around. No more carrying ID.
                              The likelihood of this being implemented in a logical, reasonable and secure way by either the government or a favored or low-bid contractor is extremely low.
                              In game handle: Steel Scion
                              sigpic

                              Comment

                              Connect

                              Collapse

                              TeamSpeak 3 Server

                              Collapse

                              Advertisement

                              Collapse

                              Twitter Feed

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X