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  • Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

    Stanford's nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

    Now... how long until the comercialization?

  • #2
    Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

    Eggsellence.

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    • #3
      Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

      Now, if we can just tether it in the magnetosphere...


      Just kidding! ;)
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      • #4
        Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

        Originally posted by CingularDuality View Post
        Now, if we can just tether it in the magnetosphere...


        Just kidding! ;)
        Thats actually not a bad idea. Think of the amount of potential electricity that could be stored by creating large arrays of these. Even if the tether were to be disabled, these could provide non-centralized power to homes and vehicles. This could really, REALLY, be a landmark in power storage technology.

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        • #5
          Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

          The MIT developed A123 Li-Ion battery was actually the first to foray into the realm of nanotech. In doing-so they were able to create batteries that charge and discharge at ridiculous rates without great performance degradation, all the while being able to take advantage of Li-Ion capacity. (your 1st gen plug-in hybrids will have A123 li-ions in them)

          In a way, Stanford took it a step further and used the nanotech in the actual physical chemistry of the battery... very slick. I'm curious to see what the charge/discharge rates for this battery are though. Being able to charge a Lithium battery faster than 1C is an awesome power... being able to do it with 10 times the capacity is, well... awesomer

          :)


          I wouldnt fret about the timeline for this new battery. I think once the MIT announcement came out it took like 6 months for a commercial version to be available to hobbyists. Even before then, they were giving out development kits. Only problem with this new battery is dealing with the big-money special interests... as they will do anything to keep the tech. quiet (most people still arent aware of the A123 battery).

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          • #6
            Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

            Originally posted by CingularDuality View Post
            Now, if we can just tether it in the magnetosphere...


            Just kidding! ;)
            No.. actually you're not kidding :)
            Capacitors like this are the key to making that tech. viable. The power from spaceborn tethers dragged along the outer atmosphere is useless if we cant store it in a lightweight, efficient capacitor.

            I'd be interested to see how these batteries behave in zero-G though. You'd think there would be an even greater efficiency. Only issue is dealing with the extreme temps of space.

            I dunno if you guys ever saw the experiments they did with orbital tethers, but the amount of power they generated was ridiculous.. it eventually disintegrated the tether of course.

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            • #7
              Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

              Originally posted by Gambit7 View Post
              No.. actually you're not kidding :)
              Capacitors like this are the key to making that tech. viable. The power from spaceborn tethers dragged along the outer atmosphere is useless if we cant store it in a lightweight, efficient capacitor.

              I'd be interested to see how these batteries behave in zero-G though. You'd think there would be an even greater efficiency. Only issue is dealing with the extreme temps of space.

              I dunno if you guys ever saw the experiments they did with orbital tethers, but the amount of power they generated was ridiculous.. it eventually disintegrated the tether of course.

              We're having a discussion about it and other off the books things in area 51 (located in the sandbox).

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              • #8
                Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

                Originally posted by mentholated View Post
                We're having a discussion about it and other off the books things in area 51 (located in the sandbox).
                There's nothing "off-the-books" about space-based tethered power-generators. It's old tech. that requires newer materials to make happen.

                If you want me to whet ur whistle further... just think of how you could apply this tech above a planet like Jupiter :)

                Another interesting offshoot tech. is tethered "ram-scoops." The scoops would basically pick hydrogen (or other elements) out of the atmosphere of gas giants. Sort of like a refueling station of sorts.

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                • #9
                  Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

                  Originally posted by Gambit7 View Post
                  There's nothing "off-the-books" about space-based tethered power-generators. It's old tech. that requires newer materials to make happen.

                  If you want me to whet ur whistle further... just think of how you could apply this tech above a planet like Jupiter :)

                  Another interesting offshoot tech. is tethered "ram-scoops." The scoops would basically pick hydrogen (or other elements) out of the atmosphere of gas giants. Sort of like a refueling station of sorts.
                  I take it they've tested bussard (ion) collectors then?

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                  • #10
                    Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

                    Originally posted by mentholated View Post
                    I take it they've tested bussard (ion) collectors then?
                    As far as I know... no
                    But, it's been theorized as a way to refuel fusion reactors aboard ships, or to resupply fuel depots.

                    Jupiter is the gateway to the outer solar system. Once you get there, you've got near endless supplies of resources for a long journey.

                    Farming hydrogen has always been a smart theory. Many people seem to think the only way to get it is by expending large amounts of energy in a water-based reaction. Fact is, we can just pluck it from space. Picture huge hydrogen gas-ships making round trips back and forth from Jupiter. Even more, picture automated hydrogen collectors simply "flinging" H2 tanks back and forth from earth.

                    Beyond that, picture huge liquid methane ships making trips from Titan (Saturn's moon).

                    The potential for space-capitalism is staggering. And I havent even discussed our eventual water shortage. You think the movie "Ice Pirates" was a campy joke? It was actually a well thought out parody of the future. There's simply not enough fresh water on the Earth to supply an exponentially expanding human population. Soooo.. where do you get it? (look up for the answer)

                    Bah! this is a topic for another thread...

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                    • #11
                      Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

                      Originally posted by Gambit7 View Post
                      As far as I know... no
                      But, it's been theorized as a way to refuel fusion reactors aboard ships, or to resupply fuel depots.

                      Jupiter is the gateway to the outer solar system. Once you get there, you've got near endless supplies of resources for a long journey.

                      Farming hydrogen has always been a smart theory. Many people seem to think the only way to get it is by expending large amounts of energy in a water-based reaction. Fact is, we can just pluck it from space. Picture huge hydrogen gas-ships making round trips back and forth from Jupiter. Even more, picture automated hydrogen collectors simply "flinging" H2 tanks back and forth from earth.

                      Beyond that, picture huge liquid methane ships making trips from Titan (Saturn's moon).

                      The potential for space-capitalism is staggering. And I havent even discussed our eventual water shortage. You think the movie "Ice Pirates" was a campy joke? It was actually a well thought out parody of the future. There's simply not enough fresh water on the Earth to supply an exponentially expanding human population. Soooo.. where do you get it? (look up for the answer)

                      Bah! this is a topic for another thread...

                      Make the thread then. Lets talk business.

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                      • #12
                        Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

                        How much would they cost? :icon_eek:
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                        • #13
                          Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

                          Well, assuming any commercial process has a high yield, I would suspect that a battery of this type with typical performance (typical of today's runtime) would cost roughly the same as today's batteries. Prices would probably go up from there. I'm sure a 10x battery life will be a 10x price multiplier. At this time I would be happy with 4x what I have now. That would give my work laptop 12hrs of life. That would be heavenly. I work for Altronic Inc., and quite often we have to travel to customer sites where AC power is very limited due to safety concerns.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

                            That doesn't make any sense with the prices. Assuming you can adopt already high yield manufacturing processes of li-ion batteries to include the additional step of creating the nano wires, the cost of the battery shouldn't be too much more to produce. In addition to that, with a 10x max on battery life, wouldn't there be less demand on batteries overall because you would theoretically need 10x less (assuming you can implement this kind of tech through all battery types)?
                            USAR

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                            • #15
                              Re: Nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones

                              Lithium-poly/ion batteries are pound for pound the cheapest batteries in the world. Over the long haul, they're MUCH cheaper then alternatives. Since they hold so much more energy, in reality you're getting a much greater lifespan. A 1000 cycle li-poly that can hold a laptop charge for 24hrs at MOST would need to be recharged after every 3rd use (assuming 8hr usage/day). That's nearly 10 years of battery life. No heavy metal battery can touch that. Also, the construction is more like playing with composites rather than playing with acids and heavy-metals.

                              As for the prices, they drop about as much as the computer industry does. When Li-poly came out, Li-ion became cheap. When A123 came out, Li-poly became cheap. This Li-ion/silicon battery will drive the A123 and Li-poly prices down even more. Once a reliable Li-Sulfur battery comes out we'll see ever more price breaks.

                              Battery manufacturing is one of the hottest small business startups in the tech. world right now. It's not very complex to do (you or I could actually build our own batteries if we wanted). Back when I was into R/C it seemed like there was a new Li-poly/ion manufacturer every damned day- each trying to beat out the other on price.

                              So I wouldnt worry too much about cost right now, they fall pretty fast. It's not a very exclusive technology... we're talking simple capacitors here. The biggest issues involve voltage regulation and cell-balancing, as lithium batts. are picky in those regards - but that has nothing to do with the cells themselves, it can be handled externally.

                              Btw, about 10 grand could get you a full A123 Li-Ion/poly plug-in hybrid conversion. With today's fuel prices, that pays for itself in 3-years. And that's not even factoring in the maintenance costs for IC motors, along with all the other fluids. Nor does it factor in energy retained from braking.

                              To take it further, you can also put your house on/off the grid by using the caps. in your car. Instead of the power company making energy you never use in off-peak times, it goes to your car. During peak-times (when you're at home) the car contributes back to the grid, taking the load off the power company. What happens?? Energy prices go down.
                              It's kind of tough to explain, but I saw a study on this (some of you might've heard of it).

                              One could get fancy and rig a true UPS for their home as well. Get efficient enough with good enough capacitors and you can take yourself off the grid entirely.

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