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Dr. Fadl makes the Islamic case against terrorism

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  • Dr. Fadl makes the Islamic case against terrorism

    This event hit the press when it occured, especially in Europe, but this story does a far better job of setting the stage for Sayid Imam al-Sharif, or Dr. Fadl, and how significant his most recent writing is. Before condemning this because it was composed and transmited from an Egyptian prison, realize that Al-Jihad, and therefore the roots of Al Qaeda, were hashed from Egyptian confinement - an environment known for breeding terror, not renouncing it.

    Writing like this goes a long way in the fight against terrorism because it makes an Islamic case against it - many jihadists and potential jihadists make their decisions based on religious scholars such as this. In the business of jihad, counter-spin can go a long, long way. This is especially significant because it is coming from a man who has been so influential in making the case for Islamic terrorism, who was close friends with Ayman Al-Zarahiri, and for a time retained close ties with Al Qaeda. Though Al Qaeda renounced him and the Egyptian-centered agenda of Al-Jihad nearly a decade ago, he remains an influencial figure and scholar among many Muslims both in and outside of Egypt.

    Whether or not this represents a tangible fracture in the foundations of Islamic jihad and its acts of terrorism is debatable, but the fracture itself is a tangible step in the right direction that provides far more hope than any aspect of America's 'war on terror.'

    The premise that opens “Rationalizing Jihad” is “There is nothing that invokes the anger of God and His wrath like the unwarranted spilling of blood and wrecking of property.” Fadl then establishes a new set of rules for jihad, which essentially define most forms of terrorism as illegal under Islamic law and restrict the possibility of holy war to extremely rare circumstances. His argument may seem arcane, even to most Muslims, but to men who had risked their lives in order to carry out what they saw as the authentic precepts of their religion, every word assaulted their world view and brought into question their own chances for salvation.
    http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2...urrentPage=all

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