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  • Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

    www.truthnews.us/?p=1115

    Someone in another thread asked me if I just spend my time googling stuff that makes Bush look bad. To answer that, no.. I don't, but I do spend a lot of time reading and when something catches my eye, that I think is worth sharing, I share it. This I thought is something that really puts in perspective how far we've fallen from what this country was meant to be, and how badly we need to fix what has been broken in the last 8 years. Despite the obviousness of the illegal actions our government has been taking, I don't think anything is going to change, regardless of how many times you hear the puppets talking about 'change.'

    Anyway, this shows rather coherently just how much our constitution has been trampled on:

    (links in the article itself)

    2001

    January

    Presidential directive delays indefinitely the scheduled release of presidential documents (authorized by the Presidential Records Act of 1978) pertaining to the Reagan-Bush administration. Link

    Bush and Cheney begin process of radically broadening scope of documents and information which can be deemed classified. Link

    February

    The National Security Agency (NSA) sets up Project Groundbreaker, a domestic call monitoring program infrastructure. Link

    Spring

    Bush administration order authorizes NSA monitoring of domestic phone and internet traffic. Link

    May

    US Supreme Court rules that medical necessity is not a permissible defense against federal marijuana statutes. Link

    September

    In immediate aftermath of 9-11 terror attacks, Department of Justice authorizes detention without charge for any terror suspects. Over one thousand suspects are brought into detention over the next several months. Link (pdf)

    October

    Attorney General John Ashcroft announces change in Department of Justice (DOJ) policy. According to the new policy DOJ will impose far more stringent criteria for the granting of Freedom of Information Act requests. Link

    September-October

    NSA launches massive new database of information on US phone calls. Link

    October

    The USA Patriot Act becomes law. Among other things the law: makes it a crime for anyone to contribute money or material support for any group on the State Department’s Terror Watch List, allows the FBI to monitor and tape conversations between attorneys and clients, allows the FBI to order librarians to turn over information about patron’s reading habits, allows the government to conduct surveillance on internet and email use of US citizens without notice. The act also calls for expanded use of National Security Letters (NSLs), which allow the FBI to search telephone, email and financial records of US citizens without a court order, exempts the government from needing to reveal how evidence against suspected terrorists was obtained and authorizes indefinite detention of immigrants at the discretion of law enforcement and immigration authorities.

    NJ Superior court judge and civil liberties scholar Anthony Napolitano, author of A Nation of Sheep, has described the law’s assault on first and fourth amendment principles as follows, “The Patriot Act’s two most principle constitutional errors are an assault on the Fourth Amendment, and on the First. It permits federal agents to write their own search warrants [under the name “national security letters”] with no judge having examined evidence and agreed that it’s likely that the person or thing the government wants to search will reveal evidence of a crime… Not only that, but the Patriot Act makes it a felony for the recipient of a self-written search warrant to reveal it to anyone. The Patriot Act allows [agents] to serve self-written search warrants on financial institutions, and the Intelligence Authorization Act of 2004 in Orwellian language defines that to include in addition to banks, also delis, bodegas, restaurants, hotels, doctors’ offices, lawyers’ offices, telecoms, HMOs, hospitals, casinos, jewelry dealers, automobile dealers, boat dealers, and that great financial institution to which we all would repose our fortunes, the post office. Link 1 | Link 2

    November

    Executive order limits release of presidential documents. The order gives incumbent presidents the right to veto requests to open any past presidential records and supercedes the congressionally passed law of 1978 mandating release of all presidential records not explicitly deemed classified. Link

    2002

    Winter

    FBI and Department of Defense (DOD), forbidden by law from compiling databases on US citizens, begin contracting with private database firm ChoicePoint to collect, store, search and maintain data. Link

    Spring

    Secret executive order issued authorizing NSA to wiretap the phones and read emails of US citizens. Link

    Spring

    Transportation Security Adminstration (TSA) acknowledges it has created both a “No Fly” and a separate “Watch” list of US travelers. Link

    May

    Department of Justice authorizes the FBI to monitor political and religious groups. The new rules permit the FBI to broadly search or monitor the internet for evidence of criminal activity without having any tips or leads that a specific criminal act has been committed. Link

    June

    Supreme Court upholds the right of school administrators to conduct mandatory drug testing of students without probable cause. Link

    November

    Homeland Security Act of 2002 establishes separate Department of Homeland Security. Among other things the department will federally coordinate for the first time all local and state law enforcement nationwide and run a Directorate of Information and Analysis with authority to compile comprehensive data on US citizens using public and commercial records including credit card, phone, bank, and travel. The department also will be exempt form Freedom of Information Act disclosure requirements. The Homeland Security department’s jurisdiction has been widely criticized for being nebulously defined and has extended beyond terrorism into areas including immigration, pornography and drug enforcement. Link 1 | Link 2

    2003

    February

    Draft of Domestic Security Enhancement Act (aka Patriot Act 2), a secret document prepared by the Department of Justice is leaked by the Center for Public Integrity. Provisions of the February 7th draft version included:

    Removal of court-ordered prohibitions against police agencies spying on domestic groups.

    The FBI would be granted powers to conduct searches and surveillance based on intelligence gathered in foreign countries without first obtaining a court order.

    Creation of a DNA database of suspected terrorists.

    Prohibition of any public disclosure of the names of alleged terrorists including those who have been arrested.

    Exemptions from civil liability for people and businesses who voluntarily turn private information over to the government.

    Criminalization of the use of encryption to conceal incriminating communications.

    Automatic denial of bail for persons accused of terrorism-related crimes, reversing the ordinary common law burden of proof principle. All alleged terrorists would be required to demonstrate why they should be released on bail rather than the government being required to demonstrate why they should be held.

    Expansion of the list of crimes eligible for the death penalty.

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency would be prevented from releasing “worst case scenario” information to the public about chemical plants.

    United States citizens whom the government finds to be either members of, or providing material support to, terrorist groups could have their US citizenship revoked and be deported to foreign countries.

    Although the bill itself has never (yet) been advanced in congress due to public exposure, some of its provisions have become law as parts of other bills. For example The Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2004 grants the FBI unprecedented power to obtain records from financial institutions without requiring permission from a judge. Under the law, the FBI does not need to seek a court order to access such records, nor does it need to prove just cause. Link 1 | Link 2

    March

    Executive order issued which radically tightens the declassification process of classified government documents, as well as making it far easier for government agencies to make and keep information classified. The order delayed by three years the release of declassified government documents dating from 1978 or earlier. It also allowed the government to treat all material sent to American officials from foreign governments — no matter how routine — as subject to classification, and expanded the ability of Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) to shield documents from declassification. Finally it gave the vice president the power to classify information. Link 1 | Link 2

    March

    In a ruling seen as a victory for the concentration of ownership of intellectual property and an erosion of the public domain, the Supreme Court in Eldred v. Ashcroft held that a 20-year extension of the copyright period (from 50 years after the death of the author to 70 years) called for by the Sonny Bono copyright Extension not violate either the Copyright Clause or the First Amendment. Link

    April

    In Demore v. Kim, the Supreme Court ruled that even permanent residents could be subject to mandatory detention when facing deportation based on a prior criminal conviction, without any right to an individualized hearing to determine whether they were dangerous or a flight risk. Link

    Fall

    The FBI changes its traditional policy of destroying all data and documents collected on innocent citizens in the course of criminal investigations. This information would, according to the bureau, now be permanently stored. Two years later in late 2005 Executive Order 13388, expanded access to those files for “state, local and tribal” governments and for “appropriate private sector entities,” which are not defined. Link 1 | Link 2

    Fall

    As authorized by the Patriot Act, the FBI expands the practice of national security letters. NSLs, originally introduced in the 1970s for espionage and terrorism investigations, enabled the FBI to review in secret the customer records of suspected foreign agents. This was extended by the Patriot Act to include permitting clandestine scrutiny of all U.S. residents and visitors whether suspected of terrorism or not. Link

    2004

    January

    The FBI begins keeping a database of US citizens based on information obtained via NSLs. Link

    Spring

    John Ashcroft invokes State Secrets privilege to forbid former FBI translator Sibel Edmunds from testifying in a case brought by families of victims of the 9-11 attacks. Litigation by 9-11 families is subsequently halted. Link 1 | Link 2

    June

    Supreme Court upholds Nevada state law allowing police to arrest suspects who refuse to provide identification based on police discretion of “reasonable suspicion.” Link

    2005

    January

    Supreme court rules that police do not need to have probable cause to have drug sniffing dogs examine cars stopped for routine traffic violations. Link 1 | Link 2

    June

    Supreme Court rules that the federal government can prosecute medical marijuana users even in states which have laws permitting medical marijuana. Link

    Summer

    The Patriot Act, due to expire at the end of 2005, is reauthorized by Congress. Link

    Winter 2005

    Senate blocks reauthorization of certain clauses in Patriot Act. Link

    2006

    March

    Senate passes amended version of Patriot Act, reauthorization, with three basic changes from the original including: recipients of secret court orders to turn over sensitive information on individuals linked to terrorism investigations are not allowed to disclose those orders but can challenge the gag order after a year, libraries would not be required to turn over information without the approval of a judge, recipients of an FBI “national security letter” — an investigator’s demand for access to personal or business information — would not have to tell the FBI if they consult a lawyer. New bill also said to extend Congressional oversight over executive department usage guidelines. Shortly after bill is signed George Bush declares oversight rules are not binding. Link 1 | Link 2

    June

    Supreme court rules that evidence obtained in violation of the “knock and announce” rules can still be permitted in court. Link

    September

    US Congress and Senate approve the Military Commissions Act, which authorizes torture and strips non- US citizen detainees suspected of terrorist ties of the right of habeas corpus (which includes formal charges, counsel and hearings). It also empowers US presidents at their discretion to declare US citizens as enemy combatants and subject to detention without charge or due process. Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3

    October

    John Warner Defense Authorization Act is passed. The act allows a president to declare a public emergency and station US military troops anywhere in America as well as take control of state based national guard units without consent of the governor or other local authorities. The law authorizes presidential deployment of US troops to round-up and detain “potential terrorists”, “illegal aliens” and “disorderly” citizenry. Link 1 | Link 2

    2007

    May

    National Security Presidential Directive 51 (NSPD-51) establishes a new post-disaster plan (with disaster defined as any incident, natural or man-made, resulting in extraordinary mass casualties, damage or disruption) which places the president in charge of all three branches of government. The directive overrides the National Emergencies Act which gives Congress power to determine the duration of a national emergency. Link 1 | Link 2

    June

    In “Bong Hits for Jesus” case Supreme court rules that student free speech rights do not extend to promotion of drug use. Link

    July

    Executive Order 13438: “Blocking Property of Certain Persons Who Threaten Stabilization Efforts in Iraq, issued. The order asserts the government’s power to confiscate the property “of persons determined to have committed, or to pose a significant risk of committing, an act or acts of violence that have the purpose or effect of threatening the peace or stability of Iraq or the Government of Iraq or undermining efforts to promote economic reconstruction and political reform in Iraq or to provide humanitarian assistance to the Iraqi people.”

    October

    The Violent Radicalization and Homegrown Terrorism Act passes the House of Representatives 400 to 6 (to be voted on in the Senate in 2008). The act proposes the establishment of a commission composed of members of the House and Senate, Homeland Security and others, to “examine and report upon the facts and causes of violent radicalization, homegrown terrorism, and ideologically based violence in the United States” and specifically the role of the internet in fostering and disseminating extremism. According to the bill the term `violent radicalization’ means the process of adopting or promoting an extremist belief system for the purpose of facilitating ideologically based violence to advance political, religious, or social change, while the term ‘ideologically-based violence’ means the use, planned use, or threatened use of force or violence by a group or individual to promote the group or individual’s political, religious, or social beliefs.” Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3

  • #2
    Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

    I'm not quite sure how Bush is responsible for the way the Supreme Court and a Democratic Congress votes.
    Last edited by whistler; 07-17-2008, 04:46 PM.



    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

      Most of these kind of posts could be tied to any president regardless of party. Look at FDR or JFK or Reagan or Nixon. They just get old.

      Only reason the president today and in the future will be so openly criticized about everything they do is because the media and "news" has so much more access and ability to broadcast stuff so much quicker and easier.
      that sounds like a good idea trooper.
      -Vulcan

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

        Originally posted by Trooper View Post
        Most of these kind of posts could be tied to any president regardless of party. Look at FDR or JFK or Reagan or Nixon. They just get old.
        What does that even mean?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

          Most of these posts are people bashing Bush and/or are democrats. Granted the guy has really messed up somethings in his terms, but you can look at every single president and find their mistakes. Look at FDR JFK Nixon and Reagan.

          The only reason people are able to jump all over bush is because of the media, he drops a chip and the media starts the rumor/new mill rolling.

          And consider this, you people voted him in. Whine and complain all you want but he won the election deal with it.
          that sounds like a good idea trooper.
          -Vulcan

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

            I didn't even vote for him during the 2004 election. So I will continue to pout, rant, and otherwise speak somewhat lowly of the president. :row__644:
            |TG-18th| Acreo Aeneas
            TG World of Tanks Clan Executive Officer
            Former 9th & 13th

            Pronounciation: Eh-Cree-Oh Ah-Nay-Ess
            Still can't say it? Call me Acorn then. -.-





            SSDs I Own: Kingston HyperX 3K (240 GB), Samsung 840 Pro (256 GB), Samsung 840 EVO (250 GB), Samsung 840 x 2 (120 GB), Plextor M5S (120 GB), OCZ Vertex (30 GB)

            TG Primer and Rules

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

              Yeah, the very first item under the "Bill of Rights" thing is about the Presidential Records Act, which to my knowledge is not located in any of the fist 10 Amendments.
              ---
              Sources say the Dow Jones' decline is directly related to Dethklok front-man Nathan Explosion's constant deleting of potential new albums.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

                Bush and Cheney begin process of radically broadening scope of documents and information which can be deemed classified. Link
                While we were not at war yet the same thing happens around every war.

                US Supreme Court rules that medical necessity is not a permissible defense against federal marijuana statutes. Link
                Use of a mind altering substance was never a legally protected liberty. It is a privilege.

                Executive order limits release of presidential documents. The order gives incumbent presidents the right to veto requests to open any past presidential records and supercedes the congressionally passed law of 1978 mandating release of all presidential records not explicitly deemed classified. Link
                Any president could have done this. Nixon did it, and I'm pretty sure FDR did it too. Our constitutions GIVES the president the power of executive order. Don't cry foul when he did nothing wrong constitutionally.

                Department of Justice authorizes the FBI to monitor political and religious groups. The new rules permit the FBI to broadly search or monitor the internet for evidence of criminal activity without having any tips or leads that a specific criminal act has been committed. Link
                The FBI also monitors sites like 4chan - they don't need tips to do that. They pay someone to sit and read it.

                Supreme Court upholds the right of school administrators to conduct mandatory drug testing of students without probable cause. Link
                That's the supreme court's problem, not the executive branches. GW only nominated Roberts and Alito. And they were both brought in AFTER 2002.

                Supreme Court upholds Nevada state law allowing police to arrest suspects who refuse to provide identification based on police discretion of “reasonable suspicion.” Link
                If you are innocent, why would you NOT show ID? I don't see a reason not to show ID. It just singles you out.

                Supreme court rules that police do not need to have probable cause to have drug sniffing dogs examine cars stopped for routine traffic violations. Link 1 | Link 2
                I don't care - I don't do drugs, would never possess drugs, and never intend on it. Is using illegal drugs a right in the constitution?

                The Patriot Act, due to expire at the end of 2005, is reauthorized by Congress. Link
                Oh look, a mention of CONGRESS.

                Senate blocks reauthorization of certain clauses in Patriot Act. Link
                OK - so they were doing there jobs. I don't see how this tramples anything.

                Senate passes amended version of Patriot Act, reauthorization, with three basic changes from the original including: recipients of secret court orders to turn over sensitive information on individuals linked to terrorism investigations are not allowed to disclose those orders but can challenge the gag order after a year, libraries would not be required to turn over information without the approval of a judge, recipients of an FBI “national security letter” — an investigator’s demand for access to personal or business information — would not have to tell the FBI if they consult a lawyer. New bill also said to extend Congressional oversight over executive department usage guidelines. Shortly after bill is signed George Bush declares oversight rules are not binding. Link 1 | Link 2
                So... Congress did it's job again?

                US Congress and Senate approve the Military Commissions Act, which authorizes torture and strips non- US citizen detainees suspected of terrorist ties of the right of habeas corpus (which includes formal charges, counsel and hearings). It also empowers US presidents at their discretion to declare US citizens as enemy combatants and subject to detention without charge or due process. Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3
                "The Constitution does not provide alien enemy combatants detained at Guantanamo Bay with the constitutional right to file a petition for habeas corpus in our civilian courts, and thus Congress may regulate those combatants' access to the courts"

                -James Robertson

                John Warner Defense Authorization Act is passed. The act allows a president to declare a public emergency and station US military troops anywhere in America as well as take control of state based national guard units without consent of the governor or other local authorities. The law authorizes presidential deployment of US troops to round-up and detain “potential terrorists”, “illegal aliens” and “disorderly” citizenry. Link 1 | Link 2
                He is commander and chief. He ultimately has say over the actions of our military.

                National Security Presidential Directive 51 (NSPD-51) establishes a new post-disaster plan (with disaster defined as any incident, natural or man-made, resulting in extraordinary mass casualties, damage or disruption) which places the president in charge of all three branches of government. The directive overrides the National Emergencies Act which gives Congress power to determine the duration of a national emergency. Link 1 | Link 2
                The mess of agencies inaction and ill-leadership WAS the cause of the end result of Katrina. FEMA and others DROPPED THE BALL.

                In “Bong Hits for Jesus” case Supreme court rules that student free speech rights do not extend to promotion of drug use. Link
                Drugs are bad, mmkay?

                The Violent Radicalization and Homegrown Terrorism Act passes the House of Representatives 400 to 6 (to be voted on in the Senate in 2008). The act proposes the establishment of a commission composed of members of the House and Senate, Homeland Security and others, to “examine and report upon the facts and causes of violent radicalization, homegrown terrorism, and ideologically based violence in the United States” and specifically the role of the internet in fostering and disseminating extremism. According to the bill the term `violent radicalization’ means the process of adopting or promoting an extremist belief system for the purpose of facilitating ideologically based violence to advance political, religious, or social change, while the term ‘ideologically-based violence’ means the use, planned use, or threatened use of force or violence by a group or individual to promote the group or individual’s political, religious, or social beliefs.” Link 1 | Link 2 | Link 3
                First off, if Democrats opposed it, why did they all vote for it? Secondly, it's a comittee to find the SOURCE of a problem.

                How does that infringe my civil liberties/rights? The way I see it, as I sit here typing, my rights are not being steamrolled at all. I'm fine - you're fine - you're neighbors are probably fine... Most of these had to do with the LEGISLATIVE branch passing bills/laws. Don't. Blame. Bush. For everything.

                unless...

                You are an AMERICAN and were actually making this post to inform us on what the government as a WHOLE has done, instead of JUST BUSH. Everyone loves to point the finger at BUSH when he [Bush] is the president and is only given the power granted to him by the constitution.
                Skud


                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

                  Originally posted by TheSkudDestroyer View Post
                  While we were not at war yet the same thing happens around every war.



                  Use of a mind altering substance was never a legally protected liberty. It is a privilege.



                  Any president could have done this. Nixon did it, and I'm pretty sure FDR did it too. Our constitutions GIVES the president the power of executive order. Don't cry foul when he did nothing wrong constitutionally.



                  The FBI also monitors sites like 4chan - they don't need tips to do that. They pay someone to sit and read it.



                  That's the supreme court's problem, not the executive branches. GW only nominated Roberts and Alito. And they were both brought in AFTER 2002.



                  If you are innocent, why would you NOT show ID? I don't see a reason not to show ID. It just singles you out.



                  I don't care - I don't do drugs, would never possess drugs, and never intend on it. Is using illegal drugs a right in the constitution?



                  Oh look, a mention of CONGRESS.



                  OK - so they were doing there jobs. I don't see how this tramples anything.



                  So... Congress did it's job again?



                  "The Constitution does not provide alien enemy combatants detained at Guantanamo Bay with the constitutional right to file a petition for habeas corpus in our civilian courts, and thus Congress may regulate those combatants' access to the courts"

                  -James Robertson



                  He is commander and chief. He ultimately has say over the actions of our military.



                  The mess of agencies inaction and ill-leadership WAS the cause of the end result of Katrina. FEMA and others DROPPED THE BALL.



                  Drugs are bad, mmkay?



                  First off, if Democrats opposed it, why did they all vote for it? Secondly, it's a comittee to find the SOURCE of a problem.

                  How does that infringe my civil liberties/rights? The way I see it, as I sit here typing, my rights are not being steamrolled at all. I'm fine - you're fine - you're neighbors are probably fine... Most of these had to do with the LEGISLATIVE branch passing bills/laws. Don't. Blame. Bush. For everything.

                  unless...

                  You are an AMERICAN and were actually making this post to inform us on what the government as a WHOLE has done, instead of JUST BUSH. Everyone loves to point the finger at BUSH when he [Bush] is the president and is only given the power granted to him by the constitution.
                  Ding! The topic name is just the name of the article, I'm trying to point out the awful tragedies our government has continually done to our freedom over the last 8 years. Bush is easy to scapegoat, but you should all recognise now that the entire government is corrupt, not just the executive branch. And yes, I am an american. And I'm neither democrat nor republican, though I do side with traditional conservative republican views. The democrats are equally as irresponsible as the republicans and this is not a matter of party. We should all recognise that "parties" are simply distractions that the so called leaders of our government use to keep us locked in this dualistic frame of mind. They're just two sides of the same coin.

                  Originally posted by Trooper View Post
                  Most of these posts are people bashing Bush and/or are democrats. Granted the guy has really messed up somethings in his terms, but you can look at every single president and find their mistakes. Look at FDR JFK Nixon and Reagan.

                  The only reason people are able to jump all over bush is because of the media, he drops a chip and the media starts the rumor/new mill rolling.

                  And consider this, you people voted him in. Whine and complain all you want but he won the election deal with it.
                  That can be argued against.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

                    We should all recognise that "parties" are simply distractions that the so called leaders of our government use to keep us locked in this dualistic frame of mind. They're just two sides of the same coin.
                    I essentially agree with this statement but I usually just say "The two parties are just special interest groups and all they care about is their special interest people and not ALL people"
                    sigpic

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

                      Originally posted by TheSkudDestroyer View Post
                      Use of a mind altering substance was never a legally protected liberty. It is a privilege.
                      I think you have it backwards....

                      IX: The enumeration in the Constitution, of certain rights, shall not be construed to deny or
                      disparage others retained by the people.
                      Just because its not written in the constitution does not mean we do not have that liberty. While the government in action is supporting a prohibition and denying individuals of their right to use or abuse their bodies as they like, according to our founding documents we are completely free to intoxicate ourselves.

                      To support that, consider the fact that the constitution was amended for alcohol prohibition. The goverment at large has lost respect for the central pillar of our government (the constitution) when it didn't even bother to make an amendment before inacting a prohibition.
                      |TG|Switch

                      Better known as:
                      That noob who crashed the chopper.
                      That noob who ran over the mine.
                      That noob who TK'd me with a sniper rifle.
                      That noob who hit that APC at 300m with light AT! Our APC...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

                        Originally posted by angrysniper View Post
                        Alex Jones? cool
                        New to TG?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

                          Originally posted by whistler View Post
                          I'm not quite sure how Bush is responsible for the way the Supreme Court and a Democratic Congress votes.
                          One could say that it's the difference between being 'At fault' and 'Responsible'. The President didn't necessarily cause these things to happen, but he responsible, as head of the executive, for implementing many of them.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

                            Originally posted by FrankManik View Post
                            One could say that it's the difference between being 'At fault' and 'Responsible'. The President didn't necessarily cause these things to happen, but he responsible, as head of the executive, for implementing many of them.
                            I don't think this is correct. The topic purports to use Bill of Rights to frame the listed events; Constitutionally speaking, the decisions of Congress and the Judiciary are pretty much the two things President is not responsible for.
                            ---
                            Sources say the Dow Jones' decline is directly related to Dethklok front-man Nathan Explosion's constant deleting of potential new albums.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Bill of Rights Under Bush: A Timeline

                              Originally posted by Switch View Post

                              Just because its not written in the constitution does not mean we do not have that liberty. While the government in action is supporting a prohibition and denying individuals of their right to use or abuse their bodies as they like, according to our founding documents we are completely free to intoxicate ourselves.

                              To support that, consider the fact that the constitution was amended for alcohol prohibition. The goverment at large has lost respect for the central pillar of our government (the constitution) when it didn't even bother to make an amendment before inacting a prohibition.
                              Do you feel everyone should be able to do whatever they want just because it's not in the constitution? Our government is expected to protect it's people. There is no benefit to drug use. It is harmful - just walk around a highschool and you'll see a burnout who is practically braindead because of marijuana. Should we let children drink at age 4? Should we not wear seatbelts just because we can? You can try and spell out benefits of marijuana (or ANY drug for that matter) but you'll always hit the brick wall - without the government people would die more from idiotic things.

                              Also, back to the original case... it was a 5-4 vote. The student's rights were not violated:

                              http://www.supremecourtus.gov/opinions/06pdf/06-278.pdf
                              Last edited by Skud; 07-18-2008, 02:21 AM.
                              Skud


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