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  • Google to pull out of China? After being hacked.

    It's been a thorn in my eye that Goo-don't be evil-gle has been allowing the repressive Chinese governement to censor it's results. Today Google came out with a bold statement which is a clear warning to the Chinese governement that probably is responsible for the hacking, although possibly in an indirect way. It has been known that there is a large affiliation of Chinese hackers that are independant of the governement, but always act to support it. On the other hand the fact that attempts were made to retrieve data of human rights figures, and that the whole operation was not public, leads me to think that in this case, Chinese governement agencies might be directly responsible for the attempted robbery.

    The article:
    http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/...-to-china.html

    [quote]
    A new approach to China
    1/12/2010 03:00:00 PM
    Like many other well-known organizations, we face cyber attacks of varying degrees on a regular basis. In mid-December, we detected a highly sophisticated and targeted attack on our corporate infrastructure originating from China that resulted in the theft of intellectual property from Google. However, it soon became clear that what at first appeared to be solely a security incident--albeit a significant one--was something quite different.

    First, this attack was not just on Google. As part of our investigation we have discovered that at least twenty other large companies from a wide range of businesses--including the Internet, finance, technology, media and chemical sectors--have been similarly targeted. We are currently in the process of notifying those companies, and we are also working with the relevant U.S. authorities.

    Second, we have evidence to suggest that a primary goal of the attackers was accessing the Gmail accounts of Chinese human rights activists. Based on our investigation to date we believe their attack did not achieve that objective. Only two Gmail accounts appear to have been accessed, and that activity was limited to account information (such as the date the account was created) and subject line, rather than the content of emails themselves.

    Third, as part of this investigation but independent of the attack on Google, we have discovered that the accounts of dozens of U.S.-, China- and Europe-based Gmail users who are advocates of human rights in China appear to have been routinely accessed by third parties. These accounts have not been accessed through any security breach at Google, but most likely via phishing scams or malware placed on the users' computers.

    We have already used information gained from this attack to make infrastructure and architectural improvements that enhance security for Google and for our users. In terms of individual users, we would advise people to deploy reputable anti-virus and anti-spyware programs on their computers, to install patches for their operating systems and to update their web browsers. Always be cautious when clicking on links appearing in instant messages and emails, or when asked to share personal information like passwords online. You can read more here about our cyber-security recommendations. People wanting to learn more about these kinds of attacks can read this U.S. government report (PDF), Nart Villeneuve's blog and this presentation on the GhostNet spying incident.

    We have taken the unusual step of sharing information about these attacks with a broad audience not just because of the security and human rights implications of what we have unearthed, but also because this information goes to the heart of a much bigger global debate about freedom of speech. In the last two decades, China's economic reform programs and its citizens' entrepreneurial flair have lifted hundreds of millions of Chinese people out of poverty. Indeed, this great nation is at the heart of much economic progress and development in the world today.

    We launched Google.cn in January 2006 in the belief that the benefits of increased access to information for people in China and a more open Internet outweighed our discomfort in agreeing to censor some results. At the time we made clear that "we will carefully monitor conditions in China, including new laws and other restrictions on our services. If we determine that we are unable to achieve the objectives outlined we will not hesitate to reconsider our approach to China."

    These attacks and the surveillance they have uncovered--combined with the attempts over the past year to further limit free speech on the web--have led us to conclude that we should review the feasibility of our business operations in China. We have decided we are no longer willing to continue censoring our results on Google.cn, and so over the next few weeks we will be discussing with the Chinese government the basis on which we could operate an unfiltered search engine within the law, if at all. We recognize that this may well mean having to shut down Google.cn, and potentially our offices in China.

    The decision to review our business operations in China has been incredibly hard, and we know that it will have potentially far-reaching consequences. We want to make clear that this move was driven by our executives in the United States, without the knowledge or involvement of our employees in China who have worked incredibly hard to make Google.cn the success it is today. We are committed to working responsibly to resolve the very difficult issues raised.

    Posted by David Drummond, SVP, Corporate Development and Chief Legal Officer[\quote]

  • #2
    Re: Google to pull out of China? After being hacked.

    You know you're a big dog when you can say "oh yeah, well SCREW YOU CHINA!" and then laugh about it. Metaphorically, of course.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Google to pull out of China? After being hacked.

      Yeah this blog post has a lot of balls. It only a hair's width away from directly accusing the chinese governement; something no country in the world dares at this point in time. +rep google!

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Google to pull out of China? After being hacked.

        Agreed. +Rep to Google...

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Google to pull out of China? After being hacked.

          Yes Google is doing a good thing, but does China really care? I'm curious to see their response if any.

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Google to pull out of China? After being hacked.

            China doesn't really care I bet, and I'm sure they will just block google entirely. On the other hand it is a risk though. Their richer populace is getting more and more used to western habits like traveling and use of the internet etc. The chinese are trying to balance a totalitarian governement with allowing just enough freedom to appease the new rich and middle class Han-chinese. Taking away the new freedoms that come with the new prosperity always carries with it the risk of inciting a revolt in these classes. Uygur or Tibetan protests don't worry the Chinese governement one bit, but revolt by rich Han-chinese has the possible seed in it that could grow to topple the status quo. Here's to hoping it will!

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Google to pull out of China? After being hacked.

              Here's hoping too. :D

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Google to pull out of China? After being hacked.

                http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/worl...p-hacking.html

                'Our country is at a crucial stage of reform and development, and this is a period of marked social conflicts,' said Wang, whose comments appeared on the Information Office's website. 'Properly guiding Internet opinion is a major measure for protecting Internet information security.'

                Online pornography, hacking, fraud and 'rumours' were menaces to Chinese society, Wang said, adding that the government and Internet media both have a responsibility to 'guide' opinion.
                However, given the big investments many companies have made in China and the fact that sales there are an increasing source of profits for many firms now that demand in Western markets has softened, most will likely continue to prod Beijing for improvements in those areas but live with the consequences in any case.
                Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Google to pull out of China? After being hacked.

                  http://hotair.com/headlines/?p=75662
                  http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/35886780...ence-security/

                  BEIJING - Web sites dealing with subjects such as the Tiananmen Square democracy protests, Tibet and regional independence movements could all be accessed through Google's Chinese search engine Tuesday, after the company said it would no longer abide by Beijing's censorship rules.
                  Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

                  snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

                  Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Google to pull out of China? After being hacked.

                    Oh we got a fight on our hands now. Let's see if they ca nget Bing to drop the proverbial soap in the shower. How long before they ban all of google. Exciting.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Google to pull out of China? After being hacked.

                      Now its gonna get banned for sure!
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