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A Clinical Analysis of Anti-Government Phobia

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  • A Clinical Analysis of Anti-Government Phobia

    http://www.tetrahedron.org/articles/...nt_Phobia.html

    Although the prognosis is generally good if the illness is treated soon after symptoms first appear, studies have shown that a disturbingly low percentage of patients allow themselves to be treated. Thus, having the patient committed to a qualified mental health institution is the best option for family and loved ones. For this reason, all psychiatrists and family physicians should be provided with educational materials which will help them recognize the various symptoms and warning signs accompanying onset. Once the illness is properly diagnosed, they should next notify the patient's immediate family members and discuss the various treatment options with them. This effort should be reinforced with extensive public ad campaigns promoting a 1-800 help line. Since comparatively little is known about Anti-Government Phobia at the present time, a government-funded health commission should be set up to oversee, and help focus, future research.
    Perhaps the author should write another article about stage 2 of this disorder (which I think I've moved to), in which one is resigned to the situation and attempts to learn how to use government power for personal gain. In other words, study the crazy people who run the asylum.
    Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

    snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

    Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

  • #2
    Re: A Clinical Analysis of Anti-Government Phobia

    Does this read as "anyone who dislikes big government in their lives might be mentally ill" to anyone else? Sure, maybe they're a very small group of people with real disorders that have a irrational, unfounded phobia of government, but I'm sure they're many more with reasonable, justified reasons to be afraid. They must be very, very careful not to paint with a broad stroke.

    At this stage, the patient also inexplicity experiences increased delusional thinking. For instance, he may start fallaciously believing that the Federal Reserve is not in fact part of the federal government, but is instead controlled by wealthy Zionists. Other far-flung delusions may involve the United Nations, "black helicopters," concentration camps, or the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR). Delusions involving "takeovers" by foreign military troops, or jack-booted government storm troopers dressed in all black, are also commonly diagnosed.
    The federal reserve isn't a part of the government, its a government protected banking cartel that creates money for the government. That is a fact. They're genuine concerns regarding the influence of the CFR on our political leaders, and there is worry about United Nations peacekeeping forces eventually being used in the U.S. due to some event (financial collapse, hyper-inflation, riots etc...) I'd like to read up on their extensive research they've done on these issues to verify those claims before labeling those who hold them as "mentally ill".

    Family members and loved ones can help out in this effort. However, it should be noted that prevention programs work best only when the entire community is involved. We all need to practice constant vigilance in order to spot diviseness and hate in our communities. In this regard, networking is the ultimate key to success. A successful community-based empowerment program would include the following elements: citizen-citizen networks, police-citizen networks, parent-teacher networks, pastor-parisoner networks, doctor-patient networks, state-local law enforcement authority networks, and federal-state law enforcement authority networks.
    Doesn't this sound scary to anyone else?
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    • #3
      Re: A Clinical Analysis of Anti-Government Phobia

      Yes, because I trust any article credited written by Dr. Ivor E. Tower.

      By the way, if you scroll up and down this page really fast, the blurry scrolling spells out GULLIBLE.

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      • #4
        Re: A Clinical Analysis of Anti-Government Phobia

        Yeah, that's what I get for breezing through it. I've gotten lazy with my posts :o You've won this round Dr. Ivor E. Tower...

        EDIT:

        Since we're sorta on the topic, anybody read Obama's information czar's (Cass R. Sunstein) white paper that explores what the gov'ts response to conspiracy theories should look like?

        Many millions of people hold conspiracy theories; they believe that powerful people have worked together in order to withhold the truth about some important practice or some terrible event. A recent example is the belief, widespread in some parts of the world, that the attacks of 9/11 were carried out not by Al Qaeda, but by Israel or the United States. Those who subscribe to conspiracy theories may create serious risks, including risks of violence, and the existence of such theories raises significant challenges for policy and law. The first challenge is to understand the mechanisms by which conspiracy theories prosper; the second challenge is to understand how such theories might be undermined. Such theories typically spread as a result of identifiable cognitive blunders, operating in conjunction with informational and reputational influences. A distinctive feature of conspiracy theories is their self-sealing quality. Conspiracy theorists are not likely to be persuaded by an attempt to dispel their theories; they may even characterize that very attempt as further proof of the conspiracy. Because those who hold conspiracy theories typically suffer from a crippled epistemology, in accordance with which it is rational to hold such theories, the best response consists in cognitive infiltration of extremist groups. Various policy dilemmas, such as the question whether it is better for government to rebut conspiracy theories or to ignore them, are explored in this light.
        http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.c...act_id=1084585

        You can read the full .pda from the "one click download" link. It essentially states that direct gov't counter-information often fuels the fire and helps legitimize existing conspiracies, and that it should enlist independent groups to supply rebuttals. Lastly, utilize "cognitive infiltration designed to break up the crippled epistemology of conspiracy minded groups and informationally isolated social networks". Interesting read. I think this guy wrote a very good response to the ideas explored in the paper:

        http://current.com/12mt44c
        Last edited by aeroripper; 03-11-2010, 11:01 PM.
        Like the server? Become a regular! TGNS Required Reading
        Answers to every server question? Yes! TGNS FAQ

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        • #5
          Re: A Clinical Analysis of Anti-Government Phobia

          by the way, in a snopes-esque fashion, I actually went to the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry website and debunked this. There is no such article in volume 11, series 3. Matter of fact, here is the entire table of contents for said volume:
          http://www.psychiatrist.com/pcc/tocs/pcc1101tc.htm
          (change the 1101 to 1102, 1103, 1104, 1105, 1106) for further info.
          Matter of fact, on pages 4-6, there are NO meaningful articles, as the first one listed is Primary Care and Psychiatry: The Dawning of a New Year by Larry Culpepper on page 6.
          On further investigation, a search of all articles from the journal using the terms "clinical analysis" and "phobia" yielded 0 results. Searching for "anti-government" or any piece thereof yielded 0 results as well.

          Plus, another thing is that I refuse to buy into anything coming from a website (the one in scratch's OP) that was founded and endorses a guy who has a tagline that is:
          Horowitz on Vaccines: why following your doctor's advice may be deadly!

          I left my tinfoil hat in my other pants, TYVM.

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          • #6
            Re: A Clinical Analysis of Anti-Government Phobia

            If I'd have waited to post this until April 1st, it would have been too obvious. But I did give a clue in the thread's tags. ;)
            Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

            snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

            Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

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