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  • Picky eater

    Looks like this may make the 2013 DSM IV.

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...Tabs%3Darticle

    Doctors once thought only kids were picky eaters, and that they would grow out of it. Now, however, a taskforce studying how to categorize eating disorders for the new version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, due out in 2013, is considering recognizing for the first time a disorder to be called "selective eating" that could apply to adults as well as children. The DSM, a common psychiatric reference book, would currently lump picky eaters into a classification of eating disorder "not otherwise specified," a catchall category for people who don't meet the criteria for a major disorder.
    A comment by Frank Wilson could have been written by me:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...ntId%3D1331346

    An excellent and surprising article! I’m a retired Ivy League educated surgeon who, until now, for over 60 years felt largely alone with my dislike of most foods since early childhood. I totally understand these people’s feelings and feel kinship with them. While my food range is not quite as restricted as theirs, I, too, avoid invitations to dinner at people’s houses to avoid the social embarrassment of being served food I can’t eat and “insulting” the cook. Restaurants usually have a wide enough choice to find something as long as it isn’t a seafood place. I tell people I’m “allergic” to seafood and many other foods. That’s the only way they will understand.
    I blame a lot on my parents. My father, a psychiatrist, was constantly trying to “teach me to eat everything”. My mother, a terrible cook, who listened to a radio nutritionist, was always trying to cram meals full of “protein” at the expense of taste and flavor. They convinced me in childhood that any poor performance in sports or even getting a common cold was caused by my “eating problem”. I was made to feel somehow inferior to my friends who “ate everything”. I was not allowed to ever have a dog, because my mother said she couldn’t bear to see the dog eat better food than me.
    Finally in medical school I learned that I was actually in good health and could survive successfully on my diet! (As I already had) I realized that some of my negative attitudes toward food were caused by my parents making mealtime the most unpleasant time of day by turning it into an “eating lesson” to “teach” me to eat “everything!”
    I confronted them and told them that henceforth I refused to try to “learn” to eat “properly” and would eat food that I liked, because it tasted good! If it tasted bad to me I would not eat it and would not try to eat it or humor anyone else by pretending to like it.
    I’ve done just fine since then and I hope those who share reduced food preferences (I reject the notion that it is a mental illness or disease of any sort) realize that they are OK and have a right to eat what they want with absolutely no obligation to please anyone else. To others who have the rudeness and arrogance to tell us what to eat (a personal and private choice that we don’t have to justify to anyone) I say BACK OFF and SHUT UP!
    To young mothers who in desperation have asked me as a doctor “how can I teach my child to eat?” I have said there is not a single reported instance in medical history where a child, who had adequate food available, was malnourished because of the failure of the mother to cajole, intimidate, browbeat, threaten, or otherwise force the child to eat!
    We hear about the “epidemic of obesity” today. The answer, that I’ve never heard, is to eradicate the “clean your plate” mentality from our society. Young children are being falsely taught that when they eat they are being “good” and that refusing to eat is “bad”.
    To all who share special food preferences: Food exists only for the benefit of people, NOT the other way around! You owe NOBODY a justification for what you like to eat!
    Eat whatever you like, as long as you don’t get overweight, and take a stress vitamin every day to make up for whatever your diet lacks. You are fine. There’s nothing wrong with you! Enjoy life!!!!
    Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

    snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

    Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

  • #2
    Re: Picky eater

    Seems to be a bit more than just picky eating. I won't eat black olives because I hate the taste, but I don't avoid a meal altogether for example. Poor Frank has a pretty good reason to have issues about eating, I mean comparing a kid's eating habit to the dog's in a negative manner is a good sign of poor parenting skills even if the intentions were to promote healthy eating.
    |TG-6th|Snooggums

    Just because everyone does something does not mean that it is right to do.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Picky eater

      Why did the doctor blame his parents? Why didn't he just assume that he was wired to only enjoy certain foods?

      Frank the doctor got it correct. Most of us eat only for pleasure. Nutrition and surviving are happy consequences. Even Frank would probably eat a few oysters if he was truly hungry and had no other options.

      Another example of how environment defines what normal is.
      I’m not racists, I have republican friends. Radio show host.
      - "The essence of tyranny is the denial of complexity". -Jacob Burkhardt
      - "A foolish consistency is the hobgoblin of little minds" - Emerson
      - "People should not be afraid of it's government, government should be afraid of it's People." - Line from V for Vendetta
      - If software were as unreliable as economic theory, there wouldn't be a plane made of anything other than paper that could get off the ground. Jim Fawcette
      - "Let me now state what seems to me the decisive objection to any conservatism which deserves to be called such. It is that by its very nature it cannot offer an alternative to the direction in which we are moving." -Friedrich Hayek
      - "Don't waist your time on me your already the voice inside my head." Blink 182 to my wife

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      • #4
        Re: Picky eater

        Originally posted by El_Gringo_Grande View Post
        Frank the doctor got it correct. Most of us eat only for pleasure. Nutrition and surviving are happy consequences. Even Frank would probably eat a few oysters if he was truly hungry and had no other options.
        If he really has a selective easting disorder he wouldn't. I'd eat black olives if that was all I had, but I know in my case it is a choice and not a disorder :)
        |TG-6th|Snooggums

        Just because everyone does something does not mean that it is right to do.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Picky eater

          And I'm sure if I was hungry enough I could get dinner from the cat's litter box. (I hear dogs like to do that.) That doesn't make the task pleasant, especially if it's a problem one encounters at many (it not most) guest eating situations. If it prevents you from participating in social outlets, is it not a disorder of some kind?
          Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

          snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

          Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Picky eater

            I have a misaligned bite, and I avoid all "real" meat because I find it very hard to masticate down to something I can swallow. (I'm considering orthodontics because I'm so frustrated at it.) This includes steak, roasts, even poultry and skin-on hot dogs. I seek out skinless hot dogs and chicken fingers because they're "pre-masticated". And yet I love the taste of meat, and love tons of gravy on my mashed potatoes. (And until adulthood, I avoided mashed potatoes because my primary experience was the flavorless gritty gruel that my mother claimed was potatoes.)
            Dude, seriously, WHAT handkerchief?

            snooggums' density principal: "The more dense a population, the more dense a population."

            Iliana: "You're a great friend but if we're ever chased by zombies I'm tripping you."

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Picky eater

              Originally posted by ScratchMonkey View Post
              If it prevents you from participating in social outlets, is it not a disorder of some kind?
              Only if it is extreme, as decided on a case by case basis.

              Passing on a group get together at Taco Bell because you don't like cheap fake Mexican food is different than not going to family functions because you are afraid that people might be offended if you don't eat every type of food presented. The social outlet matters, as does the reason for avoidance. Dislike and irrational fear are two different things with a fuzzy middle ground.
              |TG-6th|Snooggums

              Just because everyone does something does not mean that it is right to do.

              Comment

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