Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Newbieness and you.

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Newbieness and you.

    I'm still new myself, but this is the basics of what you need to know when starting the game.

    First of all, create your character, of course. The various races and skills you can choose are all pretty much explained in detail by the button, but I can understand your confusion. If you find yourself confused about what skills do, or what attributes do for certain skills, then hop on TS and ask. Someone will surely answer you in full detail where I could only answer you in minor detail.

    As far as what you need to do when the game starts goes, that's where I'm going to start explaining.

    The first thing you need to do is do the tutorial. This is going to take you a very large sum of time, but it will most definately be worth it. A lot of it is consumable while listening, but there is quite a bit of it that you won't understand untill you have played the game a few days.

    I suppose at this point, you're finished with the tutoirial. You may be wondering, "What now?"

    There are NPC (Non-Player Class) avatars in certain docking stations that will give you missions. These are known as Agents. With the Corporation at war, it is mostly a good idea to focus on doing things for these people. Once the corporation gets through with the war, things will change for us starting players, and other opprotunities will arise.

    But, for now, you need to stock up on ISK to prepare your ship.

    While raising money, you need to buy a few skills and train them, that is, if you don't already have them. The tutorial will explain how to train skills and I will tell you what skills you need. You are going to need to get your skills in (Insert Race Here) Frigate up to level 2 or 3. This will take awhile, I know. After that, you need to have a Spaceship Command level of atleast 1.



    Once you have completed this, and raised about 200,000 ISK, you need to decide if you want to do mining or more agent missions. If you decide to go the mining path, you need to get a Bantam. If you decide to go for missions, you need to get a Merlin for fighting. Hop on TS and ask if anyone has a Merlin or a Bantam available. TG will supply you with one, if they can.

    After you retrieve your new ship, you need to concentrate on equipping it. A lot of weapons won't be affordable, but some will. Same goes for mining equipment. You need to concentrate on how you want your skills to go. If you want to stay industrial, or choose a fighting path, or what have you.

    You skills need to be concentrated on which direction you want to go. Mining, and Science skills for the industrial/mining scene, and Gunnery and Navigation (or such) for the fighting scene.

    I'm up to 1 million ISK, and I'm getting bored. I will fill you guys in on where I go from here.

    -Mom
    Yer Mom /O>

    To all but me is the look given but never received. My heart sinks faster and faster every time I look into them, yet I do not understand their controling power on my soul. - W11114m W45h1n670n

  • #2
    Re: Newbieness and you.

    Once you get bored with agent missions, the organized ops with the corp (once we are in a safer place) are much more fun.
    Do or do not, there is no try....
    -- Yoda, Dagobah

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Newbieness and you.

      Well, its only been my second day on my trial today, so there is no way that I can even keep up with yours guys' equipment.

      Im ususally listening in on when you guys are conversing on TS, and the amount of the money that you guys are throwing around is pretty insane to me.

      There is no way I can make as much money as you do. I just scrach by. So I just mine as much as I can and take low agent missions to pass the time while I increase my skills.

      On a good note though, after only 2 days on my trial period and I do believe that when it gets close for my period to finish I will sign-up for at least a month more.
      Focused

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Newbieness and you.

        PhoenixxFire - most of the money you see being thrown around is cash from those of us who had established characters before TG got involved with EvE.
        "You live and learn. Or you don't live long."
        - Lazarus Long

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Newbieness and you.

          Ahh, yeah I realize that Strike. Even so, I think Ive barely broken 1/2 a mill in the time that I have on. Slowly but surely, though.
          Focused

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Newbieness and you.

            At some point you will up your skills and equipment enough to establish your own "system" for making money. Through contacts, mining, trade, or piracy. After that it's all good, and the isk will really start to flow regularly.
            In game handle: Steel Scion
            sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Newbieness and you.

              The best recommendation i can make to anyone starting out in eve is to get a couple 14-day trial accounts in addition to your main paid account. Now this isnt for the purposes of exploitation or anything, but for experimentation. I cant possibly start to count the number of players that I know that started a character and wound up being dissatisfied with their race coice, their starting skill choices or their skill-path choice. Use the freebie accounts to play around with skill stups and different races, find something you like and run with it. For example, most people starting out dont know that you can START a character with frigate 4. Thats right. With a little monetary bump from a friend in-game (i doubt anyone in the community would be hard-pressed to help you out with a couple hundred thousand ISK) and a couple hours training time, you could be flying a very very decent frigate your first day in character. I did this once I figured it out and wound up flying a kestrel with an excellent setup and ebing able to pay back my benefactor within 6 hours of starting the character.
              Some other general tips:
              -Before starting a character, figure out what it is you want to be able to do NOW and then learn the skill tree and plan for it. If you want to be a miner, dont invest in weapons and fighter skills. If you want to be a missile-hound, dont waste time training hybrid weapons. The skill tree is as much of a friend as it is an enemy. One days training time wasted is the difference between a million ISK in your pocket within the first couple days and a few thousand.
              -Rolling with the last point, figure out your ship progression and train for that, but dont be overzealous! I cant stress that enough. If you want to fly battleships, you need to make sure ALL of your skills are ready for it before you hop into one. Just because you have Caldari Battleship 2 trained doesnt mean you should be flying a Raven. The number of people who hop into battleships and wind up losing them within 10 minutes of leaving the station is incalculable. Ive seen way too many people who were underprepared for their ship, like people who think that fitting heavy launchers on a raven will get them anywhere but popped. Do a bit of research on your ship, and be prepared to sit in it for a while. Eve isnt a game of rapid progression. It takes patience and experience. Take my situation as an example. I went from frigates to cruisers to battlecruisers to battleships. Along the way i also trained interceptor skills. However, my main ship that I used was my beloved ferox. Now even though the ferox is a railgun boat, i had it fully loaded with launchers. May seem strange, but I have very high missile skills as a dedicated path. I used that ferox from the day I was ready to fly it for a full 4 months until I was completely ready to fly a battleship and had enough money to have two in my hangar and any setup I wanted on either. Now that seems like a long time, but it pays off. In that time I trained my skills up enough to have tech 2 EVERYTHING on both my ferox and my raven, as well as full skills in heavy missiles, crusie missiles and torpedoes. So when my ship goes out, it can shoot about anything down within its class.
              -Ship setups. This takes time to learn, but you HAVE to learn it. Most people will tell you to train for tech 2 equipment, which is smart, but you dont always need it and cant always fit it. Be aware of your ships fitting limitations. Know what kind of slots you have as well as your cap and grid limitations. Make sure you read the ship fitting forum on the eve-online forums as they are a lifesaver. With the right setup, you can be near invincible. My ferox that I used for so long did killer damage (I could take down battleships with it, which is pretty hard to do in a battlecruiser), and had a 14k shield tank with a 100+ shields per second recharge rate. I could walk into a mission with 10 ships shooting at me and never go below 50% shields, even if I went AFK for an hour. Learn about the mechanics of the ship, such things as the fact that shields recharge fastest between 30 and 50%, same thing with your capacitor. Know what kind of tank your race uses. If you're Amarr, dont go with shield tanks. If you're caldari, dont armor tank, etc etc.
              -Bookmarks. If you have favorite hunting spots, bookmark them. If you have routes that you run a lot, set bookmarks. Know how to access them through your right click menus. Even though theyre evil, use instas. For those of you that dont know what Instas are, ill explain. "Instas" or instantaneous bookmarks are bookmarks that you can warp to that put you in extremely close range to what you want to go to. Like stations or jump gates. Normally, warping to a station puts you 15km away from it and you have to sit there for a couple minutes whil your ship gets close enough to dock. An insta bookmark will put you 0km from the station and you can dock IMMEDIATELY. An insta from a warp gate will put you 0km from the gate and you can jump as soon as you come out of warp. Setting station instas is easy. As soon as you undock (NOT IN THE STATION), set a bookmark. Next time you warp back to that station, use the bookmark instead of the "warp to station" bookmark that the game supplies for you. Makes life a lot faster, and once you get into low-sec space WILL be a lifesaver on more than one occasion. Jump gate instas are more complex as they involve flying out past the jumpgate by 10km and being in line with wherever you're coming from. Not really important in high-sec, but in low sec they can save your life.
              -Missions are great ways of earning money. They give you a set goal rather than just flying around aimlessly and trying to find things to shoot at. Train up your social and connections skills to advance to higher quality and higher level agents, but be careful as you dont want to try stepping into level 2 agents with a frigate or level 3 agents with a cruiser. Be prepared for your missions. If you have any questions on objectives or setups for missions or anything at all, dont hesitate to ask people for help. DO NOT EVER run a mission that looks too good to be true from the escrow missions. Chances are, its a scam and you'll lose a whole lot of money. Stick to agents.
              -Asking people for help is king. Dont beg for ISK, dont complain that people gave you a bum scoop, dont act like a 10 year old, and people will generally help you. If you're polite, seem well enough informed and ask the right questions, you'll get tons of people to help you and might make a couple friends. Some good questions to ask are things like "can anyone tell me what setup i should use for (insert shop here)?" or "does anyone know what a good setup is for running (insert mission here)" or "anyone out there that wants to gang up for some good old-fashioned ratting?". However, asking people where good mining and ratting spots are isnt a good idea. Those places are highly coveted and those in the know are not gonna give up their secrets.
              -ISK, market and escrow. This is a point that most people overlook. When you're new to the game, you dont really understand escrow, which is fine. Buy your gear from the market if its a common item or ship or whatever. However, once you get into larger ships, you have to buy them from escrow because theyre generally not sold on the market, and if they are, theyre more expensive. Same goes with many tech 2 items and rare items. If you have a specific need, check escrow and see if someone is selling it. A lot of times you can find good deals or even people that messed up inputting the price (i got a ferox for 2.5 million ISK once instead of the standard 25 million because some poor sap entered in all the 0's except one. Big difference in price. ) But be careful. A lot of people scam on escrow, so always right click and "Inspect merchandise" before you buy to make sure the seller is actually selling what they say they are. Also, be aware of the location its at. I made the mistake of buying a very cheap raven once, only to find out that it was at a POS that I didnt have access to over 50 jumps away. Market buying is always safe on the other hand because its all done by the game. You sell something on the market, its guranteed to be what you say it is. Bottom line.
              -Dont be afraid to gang with people for hunting. Mining, probably not as much of a good idea unless theyre fighters who are gonna cover your back. But "ratting" which is short for pirate hunting (NPC killing) in high sec space, is a great way to make friends and get money as well as items and sometimes even ships.
              -Explore. Eve is a huge place and you're probably never going to see it all, but there are some really cool things out there for you to find. Feel free to hop in a shuttle and cruise around the galaxy. If you get blown up by pirates, just be quick to pod-warp. Be aware of big lag systems like Jita and Oursalert. Sometimes you have to go there, but they can generally be avoided. Exploring the user interface is a good thing too. Make sure you know what icons do what and what everything means.
              -If you're new, stay out of low-sec (low-security) space. This means that you stay in 1.0 to 0.5 space. Here, you are protected by concord from player piracy and attacks for the most part. In 0.4 and lower, there is no protection except for the corporations that inhabit the systems, and if you're not friends with them, theyll probably kill you themselves. Low-sec space is a dog-eat-dog place, and unless you've got teeth, you probably should stay in the safe areas of space.
              -ALWAYS MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A CLONE!!!!!!!!!! I cannot make this clear enough. If you dont have a clone and you get podded, you lose ALL of your experience and ALL of your skills. Always make sure you know how many skill points you have accrued and make sure you have a clone big enough that can store them. If you get podded, youre instantly transported into your clone with all of your skills intact. Ive seen quite a few people get podded and wind up flying around in a noob-ship because they didnt have a clone and all of their skills went down the toilet.
              -Try to make sure you have enough money to back yourself up. This means, if you're going to take a risk, make sure you can recover. Try to have enough money to replace your ship and all of your equipment, or buy a duplicate of everything to begin with. This is always a safe bet. This way, if you get blown up, you still have a ship and a setup to fall back on and dont wind up flying around in the noob-ship that the game provides you when you get blown up. And yes, every time you get blown up, the game gives you a free noob-ship. Also, invest in insurance. It's generally pretty cheap and will make sure that youre not out of pocket for the millions you spent on your ship. But remember, you can only insure ships...your equipment always comes out of pocket.

              Thats about all i can think of at the moment, but if you guys have any specific questions, feel free to PM me and i'll see what I can do. Just be aware that I'm not actually playing eve at the moment due to monetary constraints, so I wont be able to come in-game and help you out or anything, but for information, im at your service.

              PS - Strike, love the signature man. Favorite book in the universe.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Newbieness and you.

                Great guide for newbies Cry.Hope you don't mind if I make a few of my own annotations and add a bit about charachter creation :).

                Originally posted by CryForMe View Post
                The best recommendation i can make to anyone starting out in eve is to get a couple 14-day trial accounts in addition to your main paid account. Now this isnt for the purposes of exploitation or anything, but for experimentation. I cant possibly start to count the number of players that I know that started a character and wound up being dissatisfied with their race coice, their starting skill choices or their skill-path choice. Use the freebie accounts to play around with skill stups and different races, find something you like and run with it. For example, most people starting out dont know that you can START a character with frigate 4. Thats right. With a little monetary bump from a friend in-game (i doubt anyone in the community would be hard-pressed to help you out with a couple hundred thousand ISK) and a couple hours training time, you could be flying a very very decent frigate your first day in character. I did this once I figured it out and wound up flying a kestrel with an excellent setup and ebing able to pay back my benefactor within 6 hours of starting the character.
                Some tips when rolling your charachter:
                • If you're not sure what you want to do in EVE, when you pick you atrributes try to keep them more or less even. Perception and intelligence should be highest, them memory and willpower, then charisma.
                • Don't stress too much if your attributes aren't perfect. As long as you're in the ballpark (i.e you don't have 13 base charisma :row__522: ) you'll be fine.
                • http://wium.dk/nw/evetool/ lets you lay out the creation path of your charachter out of game. Makes it alot easier to compare different races stats and skill wise.
                • Don't be afraid to reroll after a few days if you're not entirely happy with your charachter. Sometimes rerolling can give you an advantage in the long run, just be sure to ask for help from the more experience players before you do.
                • Have fun!!



                Some other general tips:

                -Before starting a character, figure out what it is you want to be able to do NOW and then learn the skill tree and plan for it. If you want to be a miner, dont invest in weapons and fighter skills. If you want to be a missile-hound, dont waste time training hybrid weapons. The skill tree is as much of a friend as it is an enemy. One days training time wasted is the difference between a million ISK in your pocket within the first couple days and a few thousand.

                -Rolling with the last point, figure out your ship progression and train for that, but dont be overzealous! I cant stress that enough. If you want to fly battleships, you need to make sure ALL of your skills are ready for it before you hop into one. Just because you have Caldari Battleship 2 trained doesnt mean you should be flying a Raven.(that's a quick way to lose alot of money and get frustated real fast) The number of people who hop into battleships and wind up losing them within 10 minutes of leaving the station is incalculable. Ive seen way too many people who were underprepared for their ship, like people who think that fitting heavy launchers on a raven will get them anywhere but popped.(qft) Do a bit of research on your ship, and be prepared to sit in it for a while. Eve isnt a game of rapid progression. It takes patience and experience. Take my situation as an example. I went from frigates to cruisers to battlecruisers to battleships. Along the way i also trained interceptor skills. However, my main ship that I used was my beloved ferox. Now even though the ferox is a railgun boat, i had it fully loaded with launchers. May seem strange, but I have very high missile skills as a dedicated path. I used that ferox from the day I was ready to fly it for a full 4 months until I was completely ready to fly a battleship and had enough money to have two in my hangar and any setup I wanted on either. Now that seems like a long time, but it pays off. In that time I trained my skills up enough to have tech 2 EVERYTHING on both my ferox and my raven, as well as full skills in heavy missiles, crusie missiles and torpedoes. So when my ship goes out, it can shoot about anything down within its class.

                -Ship setups. This takes time to learn, but you HAVE to learn it. Most people will tell you to train for tech 2 equipment, which is smart, but you dont always need it and cant always fit it. Be aware of your ships fitting limitations. Know what kind of slots you have as well as your cap and grid limitations. Make sure you read the ship fitting forum on the eve-online forums as they are a lifesaver. With the right setup, you can be near invincible. My ferox that I used for so long did killer damage (I could take down battleships with it, which is pretty hard to do in a battlecruiser), and had a 14k shield tank with a 100+ shields per second recharge rate. I could walk into a mission with 10 ships shooting at me and never go below 50% shields, even if I went AFK for an hour. Learn about the mechanics of the ship, such things as the fact that shields recharge fastest between 30 and 50%, same thing with your capacitor. Know what kind of tank your race uses. If you're Amarr, dont go with shield tanks. If you're caldari, dont armor tank, etc etc.

                -Bookmarks. If you have favorite hunting spots, bookmark them. If you have routes that you run a lot, set bookmarks. Know how to access them through your right click menus. Even though theyre evil, use instas. For those of you that dont know what Instas are, ill explain. "Instas" or instantaneous bookmarks are bookmarks that you can warp to that put you in extremely close range to what you want to go to. Like stations or jump gates. Normally, warping to a station puts you 15km away from it and you have to sit there for a couple minutes whil your ship gets close enough to dock. An insta bookmark will put you 0km from the station and you can dock IMMEDIATELY. An insta from a warp gate will put you 0km from the gate and you can jump as soon as you come out of warp. Setting station instas is easy. As soon as you undock (NOT IN THE STATION), set a bookmark. Next time you warp back to that station, use the bookmark instead of the "warp to station" bookmark that the game supplies for you. Makes life a lot faster, and once you get into low-sec space WILL be a lifesaver on more than one occasion. Jump gate instas are more complex as they involve flying out past the jumpgate by 10km and being in line with wherever you're coming from. Not really important in high-sec, but in low sec they can save your life.

                -Missions are great ways of earning money. They give you a set goal rather than just flying around aimlessly and trying to find things to shoot at. Train up your social and connections skills to advance to higher quality and higher level agents, but be careful as you dont want to try stepping into level 2 agents with a frigate or level 3 agents with a cruiser. Be prepared for your missions. If you have any questions on objectives or setups for missions or anything at all, dont hesitate to ask people for help. DO NOT EVER run a mission that looks too good to be true from the escrow missions. Chances are, its a scam and you'll lose a whole lot of money. Stick to agents.

                -Asking people for help is king. Dont beg for ISK, dont complain that people gave you a bum scoop, dont act like a 10 year old, and people will generally help you. If you're polite, seem well enough informed and ask the right questions, you'll get tons of people to help you and might make a couple friends. Some good questions to ask are things like "can anyone tell me what setup i should use for (insert shop here)?" or "does anyone know what a good setup is for running (insert mission here)" or "anyone out there that wants to gang up for some good old-fashioned ratting?". However, asking people where good mining and ratting spots are isnt a good idea. Those places are highly coveted and those in the know are not gonna give up their secrets.

                -ISK, market and escrow. This is a point that most people overlook. When you're new to the game, you dont really understand escrow, which is fine. Buy your gear from the market if its a common item or ship or whatever. However, once you get into larger ships, you have to buy them from escrow because theyre generally not sold on the market, and if they are, theyre more expensive. Same goes with many tech 2 items and rare items. If you have a specific need, check escrow and see if someone is selling it. A lot of times you can find good deals or even people that messed up inputting the price (i got a ferox for 2.5 million ISK once instead of the standard 25 million because some poor sap entered in all the 0's except one. Big difference in price. ) But be careful. A lot of people scam on escrow, so always right click and "Inspect merchandise" before you buy to make sure the seller is actually selling what they say they are. Also, be aware of the location its at. I made the mistake of buying a very cheap raven once, only to find out that it was at a POS that I didnt have access to over 50 jumps away. Market buying is always safe on the other hand because its all done by the game. You sell something on the market, its guranteed to be what you say it is. Bottom line.

                -Dont be afraid to gang with people for hunting. Mining, probably not as much of a good idea unless theyre fighters who are gonna cover your back. But "ratting" which is short for pirate hunting (NPC killing) in high sec space, is a great way to make friends and get money as well as items and sometimes even ships.(Ratting in high sec is a time sink. No money in it whatsoever. You really need to head to low sec space to get some decent ratting in.)

                -Explore. Eve is a huge place and you're probably never going to see it all, but there are some really cool things out there for you to find. Feel free to hop in a shuttle and cruise around the galaxy. If you get blown up by pirates, just be quick to pod-warp. Be aware of big lag systems like Jita and Oursalert. Sometimes you have to go there, but they can generally be avoided. Exploring the user interface is a good thing too. Make sure you know what icons do what and what everything means.

                -If you're new, stay out of low-sec (low-security) space. This means that you stay in 1.0 to 0.5 space. Here, you are protected by concord from player piracy and attacks for the most part. In 0.4 and lower, there is no protection except for the corporations that inhabit the systems, and if you're not friends with them, theyll probably kill you themselves. Low-sec space is a dog-eat-dog place, and unless you've got teeth, you probably should stay in the safe areas of space.(Disagree here. Low-sec space can be tons of fun if you keep your wits about you, even if you are still on the trial period. Also, the rats in high sec space aren't worth bothering with. Even for a player a few days into the game)

                -ALWAYS MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A CLONE!!!!!!!!!! I cannot make this clear enough. If you dont have a clone and you get podded, you lose ALL of your experience and ALL of your skills. Always make sure you know how many skill points you have accrued and make sure you have a clone big enough that can store them. If you get podded, youre instantly transported into your clone with all of your skills intact. Ive seen quite a few people get podded and wind up flying around in a noob-ship because they didnt have a clone and all of their skills went down the toilet.(You only lose or last lvl 5 skill or something like that. But it's insanely important to have an updated clone nonetheless)

                -Try to make sure you have enough money to back yourself up. This means, if you're going to take a risk, make sure you can recover. Try to have enough money to replace your ship and all of your equipment, or buy a duplicate of everything to begin with. This is always a safe bet. This way, if you get blown up, you still have a ship and a setup to fall back on and dont wind up flying around in the noob-ship that the game provides you when you get blown up. And yes, every time you get blown up, the game gives you a free noob-ship. Also, invest in insurance. It's generally pretty cheap and will make sure that youre not out of pocket for the millions you spent on your ship. But remember, you can only insure ships...your equipment always comes out of pocket.(Summary: first rule of eve. If you can't afford to replace it, you shouldn't be flying it.)

                Thats about all i can think of at the moment, but if you guys have any specific questions, feel free to PM me and i'll see what I can do. Just be aware that I'm not actually playing eve at the moment due to monetary constraints, so I wont be able to come in-game and help you out or anything, but for information, im at your service.

                PS - Strike, love the signature man. Favorite book in the universe.
                _____________________



                ---

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Newbieness and you.

                  How do I get a clone? Is there a difference between a "clone" and a "jump clone"? If so, what and why?
                  "There are two kinds of people in this world. Those with guns and those who dig. You dig."
                  EvE Online: Jintu Xi, Bandu McWilly
                  PLAYSTATIONŽNetwork & Steam = "TrickyTerp"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Newbieness and you.

                    Clone is the current body you control, if you get podded you replace that clone.

                    Jump clones are addition clones that you can jump to from your current clone.

                    Reasons for doing so can be:
                    Jump large distances
                    Different implant sets (these dont move with you from clone to clone since they plug into the clone)
                    ermmm can't think of others.

                    Basically you have a "presence", which is your and your skills, this inhabits clones. You always have 1 clone, then you can purchase addition clones by either paying an alliance with the facilities or getting a corp standing of 8.0 with an NPC corp.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Newbieness and you.

                      Getting a clone:
                      Dock at any station with a medical facility and open up the medical window from the station panel (on the right when you're docked). Purchase a clone from the drop list with a HIGHER number of skill points than you currently have. The number of skill points indicated on the clone is the MAXIMUM number of skill points it will retain if you get podded and the clone activates (i.e. if you get podded with 5,000,000 skill points and your clone can only hold 3,000,000 you LOSE 2,000,000 skill points and all skills associated with them). To check your skill points, open your skills list and look at the very top. The total number of skill points you have is listed right there. As i said in my little guide, it sucks to have to start all over because you didnt have a clone.
                      *Note: Clones are only activated WHEN YOU GET PODDED. Once you've bought a clone, it does absolutely nothing until you die. Its just an insurance policy for your skills.

                      Jump Clones:
                      Jump clones you actually use. They are active clones that you can load up with implant sets and transfer back and forth between once per 24 hours.

                      The reasons that preston cited are all good reasons for having a jump clone. However, keep in mind that to buy a jump clone, you have to have an 8.0 standing with the CORPORATION who owns the station the jump clone is in. If this is an NPC corp, such as Caldari Navy, it can be beneficial for jumping around high sec space.

                      However, the only way to gain standing with an NPC corp is to run missions. This takes a long time. My first NPC corp jump clone came after 2 months of running level 4 missions for 3-4 hours a day. In that time, i made over 2 billion ISK in mission rewards and sales of items the rats dropped. Just so you have an idea, if you were to try to do this with level 1 missions, it would take you about 5 months of doing the same thing. Higher level missions give you more standing gains per mission.

                      With private corps, you have to get the corp to set your standings to 8.0. Easy enough as long as you're friends with them. However, be aware that jumping does nothing for you other than transport YOU from one place to another. No ships, no items, just you. So make sure you have a ship and fittings on the other side if you choose to use one.

                      I do have to say the biggest benefit i've seen for jump clones is avoiding station blockades. This means no more sitting in a station for weeks at a time because the warring corps/alliance has a blockade set up outside to blast you if you try and leave. Instas usually work for this as well, but its a bit mroe risky and if the blockade is on the ball, they'll pop you before your warp engines engage.

                      Other than that, I'd have to say that jump clones are pretty much worthless to newer players. Even most of the older/senior players I know dont use them due to the fact that you can only jump once per 24 hours.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Newbieness and you.

                        you wouldnt happen to have any of that isk left would you?
                        that sounds like a good idea trooper.
                        -Vulcan

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Newbieness and you.

                          OK then, thanks guys. I did set up a clone when I first started - as well as insured my ship. But I think the insurance has run out since then (I think it said it was for 2 weeks or something like that). I sure the clone is outdated as far as the amount of skill points it covers by now.

                          I made the journey to Tanoo (I think that's the system) where I can get Ammatar missions. I'm hoping to start running those this week. I think there's probably a medical facility there.
                          "There are two kinds of people in this world. Those with guns and those who dig. You dig."
                          EvE Online: Jintu Xi, Bandu McWilly
                          PLAYSTATIONŽNetwork & Steam = "TrickyTerp"

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Newbieness and you.

                            Trooper - Heh, unfortunately no...downside to solo 0.0 ratting and getting ganked again and again and again. Even if i did, i cant get to it cause my account is inactive.

                            Banyan - My recommendation is to always get platinum level insurance. It lasts 16 weeks (assuming you dont get yourself blown up in the next 4 months) and pays out market value for your ship, so you wont lose any money (especially if you happened to buy the ship cheaper than market value).

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Newbieness and you.

                              Gold man. I am new to this game and after playing over the past 3 weeks understand most of this thread. No need to play all the races on trial. play one for a month to undestsand the dynamics then: Read Cryforme's post. Makes alot of sense where it would not have on day 1 - 20.

                              Comment

                              Connect

                              Collapse

                              TeamSpeak 3 Server

                              Collapse

                              Advertisement

                              Collapse

                              Twitter Feed

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X