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Lessons From an Ineffective Infantry Squad

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  • Lessons From an Ineffective Infantry Squad

    Sunday 10/19/14
    10pm PST (California time) roughly


    I lead a medium sized squad, about half TG on Indar. Frankly, we were not very effective. We died a lot, and did little damage to the enemy. I left the session feeling frustrated, I think some of the guys under me did too. I take responsibility as the squad leader for our failures. This session was a sharp contrast to the really awesome 2-3 hours commanding a squad earlier that day of mostly TG guys. I decided to write about the less successful squad this weekend, not the awesome one. We can learn more from our failures.
    I have thought a bit and tried to get some general lessons about infantry out of the mistakes I made, as bad as it was. Most of this is nothing new, and has been said with regard to the real world infantry and TG before, but it bears repeating. I am going to list some limitations of infantry that became apparent during this session and some strengths that could have been better used.

    1.) Infantry are very vulnerable on open terrain. (Seems incredibly basic, but bears repeating.) This is because of 3 major threats. (Vulnerability to air power, vulnerability to armor with HE weapons, and vulnerability to being run over by harassers/other vehicles.) Repeatedly on SUnday the squad was wiped trying to move even very small distances over open terrain in the face of air and armor.

    2.) Infantry are most effective fighting from cover either inside a base or from high ground. This negates at least two of the vulnerabilities. (Vulnerability to air may remain, but mountainous terrain protects from direct vehicle fire and being run over.)

    3.) To avoid open terrain, and fight from inside a base or high ground, a sunderer or galaxy is typically used to transport the infantry quickly across open ground, but both have weaknesses. Both of these vehicles are magnets for enemy fire and often remove any hope of stealth. In addition the sunderer is particularly problematic in that it often cannot take infantry to either one of their two ideal locations (high ground or inside bases). If a sundy can get there, so can enemy armor, and it is therefore not an ideal infantry location (see problem of vehicles running over infantry). Galaxy’s can bring the squad to virtually anywhere, but do not provide blue berry spawn support, and require taking 1 squad member out of action to babysit it. I failed to use Galaxy drops sufficiently and instead relied on open terrain movement in bases that were far too hostile for that maneuver.

    4.) Infantry can only move across open terrain during contact if conditions are right-- a) enemy forces are light to moderate, b) TG infantry force is coordinated, and c.) TG infantry are properly kitted out for such maneuver (medium to long range weapons and smoke launchers). If nearby enemy forces include more than one harasser or more than one aircraft, even a short foot on open ground likely to be deadly. Seek to engage those threats before moving.

    5.) Infantry is sometimes suppressed (unable to move without severe casualties). This is a reality everyone involved with infantry must accept and live with, from squad member, to squad leader, to platoon leader. This occurs because infantry lack the toughness of armor or maneuverability of air, which allows these assets to brave significant enemy fire. There were times I should have simply accepted we were pinned, thrown away the plan in my head, and ordered the squad to stay put. Instead I continued with my plan in the face of fire that was too hot, and my brave squad members charged out of cover to their deaths.

    6.) Infantry’s advantages are:
    a) Sustainability (if you have cover, medics and engineers can keep the squad effective forever even in the face of casualties),
    b.) Low cost (limited resource cost except maxes),
    c.) Adaptability (can be reequipped quickly to face any threat, unlike armor or air)
    d.) All terrain movement (can climb mountains and hills that vehicles can’t ascend).
    e.) Can capture bases.
    f.) Stealth (300 meter detection helps them avoid air patrols which would spot and destroy a sunderer, armor, or air vehicle. Generally smaller target for enemy. Terrain can be used to avoid ground contact depending on circumstances.)
    The question foremost in my mind is "what will bring the most tactical fun to the server?"

  • #2
    Re: Lessons From an Ineffective Infantry Squad

    Very good write up Garthra. Sometimes sticking to the Primer is painful!!!!
    sigpic

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    • #3
      Re: Lessons From an Ineffective Infantry Squad

      Indeed!
      But high ground is still not safe from being run over.. scythes are getting much more confident to do so. haha!
      sigpic
      "Keep calm and wait for the medic."
      {45 270 lives saved}

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      • #4
        Re: Lessons From an Ineffective Infantry Squad

        Excellent lessons. Hard times are most profitable! I wish I could have been there and be dead with you on that one, guys. (Wink to that utterance of yours!)

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        • #5
          Re: Lessons From an Ineffective Infantry Squad

          Originally posted by Alex021 View Post
          Indeed!
          But high ground is still not safe from being run over.. scythes are getting much more confident to do so. haha!
          I've learned that if someone gets over confident at something they're easy to bluff. When scythes are running people over place C-4 on the ground wait for them to charge and detonate. Engineer turrets will also force them to pull up but they can be seen and won't eliminate the scythe.

          With Harassers just drop tank mines and focus your attention toward them. They really can only charge infantry in reasonably straight lines due to their extreme speed

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          • #6
            Re: Lessons From an Ineffective Infantry Squad

            About the C4 for scythes, they are charging at our squad.. so the c4 would kill everybody with the scythe, we'd probably be dead anyway but that's kinda risky.
            sigpic
            "Keep calm and wait for the medic."
            {45 270 lives saved}

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Lessons From an Ineffective Infantry Squad

              I wouldn't go with them anyhow. Use tank mines. They can be placed in a way that isn't likely to hit our squad as collateral damage (beyond the exploding scythe on top of us, naturally), and aren't reliant on exceptional timing and placement. Place the mines on bumps and high ground that the scythe must pass on either end of their attack run, and a few engineer turrets to stake out safe zones or funnel the scythe towards the mines.



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              • #8
                Re: Lessons From an Ineffective Infantry Squad

                Rambo/Die Hard/Expendables moment: Manage to stick C4 to the side of a charging scythe, wait until he pulls off, boom. :-) $20 to the first guy to pull it off and get it on video. I managed to drop C4 while running away from a harasser and smoke him with it, 1000:1 odds though.

                Excellent observations, Garthra. I'm glad you took the time to write it up.
                MacKahan -- Mac-Kay-an In case you were curious. ;-)

                sigpic

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                • #9
                  Re: Lessons From an Ineffective Infantry Squad

                  Id just like to add one thing about infantry cost. Yes maxes cost a lot but any type of explosive, grenade, and med kit cost you. And can't be resupplied by an engineer.

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