Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Outfit Names

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Outfit Names

    Looking for a list of possible names for a TG outfit. This would be for a Terran Republic outfit so try and work that angle in. Finally no numbers, were not the 233rd jackmoes ok? GO!

  • #2
    Re: Outfit Names

    We can also work on names for other factions as and when they are founded.

    TG Vanguard (TG:V)
    TG Terran Rangers (TG: TR)
    TG Zealous (TG: Z)
    TG Vigilant Vanguard (TG: VV) The Double V's.

    And so on.

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Outfit Names

      Thunder Gorillas

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Outfit Names

        TacticalGamer for the highest level of organization.
        Then names like Jeepo gave for subdivisions, if there are any.
        Viking

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Outfit Names

          Do you all plan on treating PS2 like all games in the past have been treated in that TG is a community not a guild and the guilds will be specialized platoons comprised of supporting members?
          Primary: IntelAgent (Planetside 2)
          Light Assault, Reconnaissance, Intel Collection

          Comment


          • #6
            Well TG does have "guilds"...our in house squads are more or less the same as a guild. Each IHS can pick which ever faction they want, no one is obligated to play on one faction or another.
            sigpic


            Do you really want invincible bears running around raping your churches and burning your women?

            Intel i7 3930k @ 4.4ghz, 8gb RAM, 2x GTX 570 1gb, OCZ Vertex 3 120 gig SSD

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Outfit Names

              The main idea now is have a general TG "guild" for each faction, open to everyone. IHS are welcome to do what they want.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Outfit Names

                Yeah I think what John said is best. Initially just get people rocking under a TG faction banner and have IHS offshoots is probably logistically easiest.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Outfit Names

                  New Conglomerate names:

                  TG Spectral Resistance
                  TG Phoenix Battalion
                  TG Peregrine Commandos

                  etc etc. I am bored leave me alone.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Outfit Names

                    Some old style regiment names for people to come up with further names.

                    Befreiungskrieg– German for the War of Liberation, referring to the campaigns of 1813 – 15.

                    Cacadores– Portuguese for “hunter,” these were Portuguese light infantry battalions.

                    Carabiniers– French, the term designated the two senior regiments of Napoleon’s heavy cavalry contingent.

                    Chasseursa Cheval – French for “mounted hunters,” this term referred to standard, generic light cavalry whose functions included scouting, reconnaissance and battlefield security.

                    Chasseurs a Pied – French for “hunters on foot,” this term referred to various light infantry formations in French service.

                    Chevaulegers– French term for “light cavalry,” but normally used in German states such as Austria.

                    Chevauleger-Lancier– French for “light cavalry lancer,” these units were originally raised to provide battlefield capable scouts to French heavy cavalry divisions.

                    Cossacks– From the Turkish quzzaq, or “adventurer,” these were Russian nomadic, tribal light cavalry who owed feudal service to the Czar, alongside Kalmuks, Bashkirsand others. Well suited for scouting and pursuit, they were almost useless on the battlefield.

                    Cuirassiers– Heavy cavalry so named because they wore the “cuirass,” a type of body armor with either front and back plate (French practice) or front plate only (Germanpractice). In some countries, notably Prussia, the name was traditional as initially the troopers wore no armor at all.

                    Demi-Brigade– During the French Revolution a formation of two volunteer and one regular battalion so named as the term regiment sounded too “royal.” In 1813, it also referred to a temporary infantry formation of battalions drawn from different regiments.

                    Dragoons– From the French for “dragon,” referring to a type of musket. Dragoons were originally mounted infantry that rode to battle, and then dismounted to fight on foot. By the Napoleonic era they had evolved into multi-purpose line cavalry, normally fighting with the heavies, but also capable of scouting and security as well. British dragoons constituted that nation’s heavy cavalry.

                    Dragoon Guards – In Britain, former Heavy Horse regiments redesignated dragoons were given this title due to their traditional senior status.

                    Eclaireurs– French Imperial Guard scout lancers.

                    Foot Artillery – Artillery so named because although the guns were pulled by horses, the gunners walked on foot beside them.

                    FreiKorps– German for “volunteer corps,” this term refers to infantry and cavalry formations raised, drilled and equipped at personal expense by patriotic nobles of several German states. They were quite effective as mobile raiding detachments.

                    Fusiliers– This term is normally associated with the British 7th (Royal) and 23d (Royal Welsh) Regiments of Foot, elite troops, known for their snazzy bearskins. During the Befreiungskrieg the term also applied to the third infantry battalion within a Prussian lineregiment, providing organic light infantry support.

                    Gardedu Korps – A German term usually denoting the senior heavy cavalry regiment ofthe army, normally an elite formation and often part of the monarch’s personal guard.

                    Garde Nationale – France’s reserve or militia establishment first formed during the Revolution to maintain public order. During the Befreiungskrieg, French LigneRegiments 135 and higher were formed directly from National Guard cohorts.

                    Gendarmes– From the French denoting “gentlemen at arms,” this normally referred to military police.

                    Grenadiers– Originally this term referred to troops whose size, intelligence and courage made them ideal candidates for hurling heavy grenades at the enemy. By the Napoleonic era they were simply elite troops afforded the toughest missions while encouraging their mates to new heights of valor.

                    Grenz– German for “border,” this term refers to the Hungarian manned border infantry regiments that secured the Austrian frontier with the Ottoman Empire. Given they operated in such broken terrain, they were used as light infantry when supporting the main Austrian army.

                    Grognards– French for “grumblers or whiners,” they initially referred to Napoleon’s Old Guard infantry, but later to the French army’s personality as a whole.

                    Guards– Guard infantry, cavalry and artillery units were originally created to provide security for the monarch, evolving in most armies to an elite reserve.

                    Highlanders– Elite British Regiments of Foot recruited exclusively from the Scottish highlands, it’s most famous three regiments being the kilted 42d (Black Watch), 79th (Cameron) and 92d (Gordon) Highland Regiments.

                    Horse Artillery – This was artillery created specifically to support mounted formations, having guns of a smaller caliber and all personnel mounted on horses. Austria, however, mounted the gunners of her “fast foot” artillery on a sausage like seat slung atop the trail of the gun, thus the name “Wurstwagon.”

                    Horse Grenadiers – This term referred to the senior heavy cavalry regiment of Napoleon’s Imperial Guard. The French term is Grenadiers a Cheval.

                    Household Cavalry – Britain’s guard cavalry establishment, consisting of the 1st and 2dLife Guards, which were normally brigaded with the blue uniformed Royal Horse Guards, the senior and only Heavy Horse regiment not converted to dragoons.

                    Hussars– Elite light cavalry taken from a Hungarian term (we think) meaning “one out of ten.” This was the conscription requirement needed to man such regiments, originally formed for use against the Ottomans. Think Captain Jack Sparrow with a spiffier uniform and foreign accent. Antoine Count de LaSalle putting it all in perspective by declaring that, “a hussar who is not dead by 30 is a jackass!” He was shot dead at 34 in 1809.

                    Jaegers (properly Jaeger zu Fus) – German for “hunters,” referring to light infantry formations in both Russian and German service, the latter often rifle armed.

                    JaegerGrenadiers – German for “light infantry grenadiers,” the term refers to RussianJaeger regiments so designated for distinguished service in the 1813-14 campaign against France.

                    Jaeger zu Pferd – German for “mounted hunters,” the term refers to generic Russian light cavalry from 1812 onwards, as well as Prussian volunteer light cavalry detachments attached to regular cavalry regiments to provide additional scouting capacity.

                    Inhaber– German for “proprietor,” the term was used in Austria and other German states to denote a noble appointed by the monarch as the colonel commanding of a regiment, thus responsible for its training and maintenance using state funds.

                    King’sGerman Legion – The KGL was an excellent German corps in service to Britain, being composed almost entirely of former Hanoverian soldiers dismissed after Napoleon conquered that small state.

                    Krakus– Polish irregular light cavalry, similar to Cossacks.

                    Landwehr– German for “militia,” designating in Prussian and Austrian, poorly trained troops hastily raised from those considered either too young or too old for normal military service.

                    Legere– French for “Light,” referring to formally named light infantry regiments within the French army.

                    Leib– German for “Life,” this title identified a formation as having a formal relationship with the monarch, often due to previous distinguished service, re: Leib Grenadier Regiment.

                    Licorne– French for “Unicorn,” this was a Russian semi-howitzer with a conical bore, four in each 12 gun battery. They received their name from the design of the lifting handles which referred to the arms of former Russian Chief of Artillery Count Petr Shuvalov.

                    Light Dragoons – In the British army the theoretical equivalent of French Chasseurs a Cheval, though more apt to cross sabers given their mounts were as large as those of the dragoons.

                    Ligne– French for “Line,” referring to line regiments, traditionally designated because their soldiers were drilled well enough to fight in a battleline. Other countries referred to them as Line Infantry, while in Britain they were Regiments of Foot.

                    Middle Guard – Regiments of Napoleon’s Imperial Guard consisting of distinguished soldiers from both the line and Young Guard, with officers and NCOs from the senior Guard regiments.

                    Old Guard – The senior regiments of Napoleon’s Imperial Guard, selected almost exclusively on merit.

                    Reserve Regiments – In Prussia the units raised in 1813 per the Krumper (German for “to clump”) system. This system allowed Prussia to avoid treaty obligations with France by continuously drafting (then releasing) soldiers through its 12 regular infantry regiments, thus building a large, drilled manpower pool for mobilization.

                    Rifle Regiments – British, specifically the 95th (Rifle) and 5th Battalion, 60th (RoyalAmerican) Regiments. Excellent skirmishers, as were British Light Regiments.

                    Schutzen– German for “sharpshooter,” this was a light infantry designation similar to Jaeger, often rifle armed.

                    Tirailleur– French for “light infantry,” normally implying Young Guard infantry. The name denoted junior status (as light infantry was originally composed of younger, more agile soldiers), not light infantry functionality.

                    Velites– This term is nearly indefinable but generally means junior troops of some sort within a guard formation. The Velites of Napoleon’s Guard Chasseurs a Cheval were, for example, young men from the privileged classes whose parents actually paid for their recruitment into the elite formation.

                    Voltigeurs– Yet another French term for light infantry, also designating Young Guard infantry, but again primarily due to their junior status as opposed to any sort of specialized light infantry function.

                    Uhlans– German, from Polish, for “lancers,” this term designated mounted lancer units within the Austrian, Prussian and Russian armies, as well as the Polish Grand Duchy of Warsaw

                    Young Guard – Junior units of Napoleon’s Imperial Guard drawn from outstanding soldiers of each year’s conscription class, officers and NCOs from the senior Guard regiments.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Outfit Names

                      Originally posted by johnflenaly View Post
                      Some old style regiment names for people to come up with further names.

                      Befreiungskrieg– German for the War of Liberation, referring to the campaigns of 1813 – 15.

                      Cacadores– Portuguese for “hunter,” these were Portuguese light infantry battalions.

                      Carabiniers– French, the term designated the two senior regiments of Napoleon’s heavy cavalry contingent.

                      Chasseursa Cheval – French for “mounted hunters,” this term referred to standard, generic light cavalry whose functions included scouting, reconnaissance and battlefield security.

                      Chasseurs a Pied – French for “hunters on foot,” this term referred to various light infantry formations in French service.

                      Chevaulegers– French term for “light cavalry,” but normally used in German states such as Austria.

                      Chevauleger-Lancier– French for “light cavalry lancer,” these units were originally raised to provide battlefield capable scouts to French heavy cavalry divisions.

                      Cossacks– From the Turkish quzzaq, or “adventurer,” these were Russian nomadic, tribal light cavalry who owed feudal service to the Czar, alongside Kalmuks, Bashkirsand others. Well suited for scouting and pursuit, they were almost useless on the battlefield.

                      Cuirassiers– Heavy cavalry so named because they wore the “cuirass,” a type of body armor with either front and back plate (French practice) or front plate only (Germanpractice). In some countries, notably Prussia, the name was traditional as initially the troopers wore no armor at all.

                      Demi-Brigade– During the French Revolution a formation of two volunteer and one regular battalion so named as the term regiment sounded too “royal.” In 1813, it also referred to a temporary infantry formation of battalions drawn from different regiments.

                      Dragoons– From the French for “dragon,” referring to a type of musket. Dragoons were originally mounted infantry that rode to battle, and then dismounted to fight on foot. By the Napoleonic era they had evolved into multi-purpose line cavalry, normally fighting with the heavies, but also capable of scouting and security as well. British dragoons constituted that nation’s heavy cavalry.

                      Dragoon Guards – In Britain, former Heavy Horse regiments redesignated dragoons were given this title due to their traditional senior status.

                      Eclaireurs– French Imperial Guard scout lancers.

                      Foot Artillery – Artillery so named because although the guns were pulled by horses, the gunners walked on foot beside them.

                      FreiKorps– German for “volunteer corps,” this term refers to infantry and cavalry formations raised, drilled and equipped at personal expense by patriotic nobles of several German states. They were quite effective as mobile raiding detachments.

                      Fusiliers– This term is normally associated with the British 7th (Royal) and 23d (Royal Welsh) Regiments of Foot, elite troops, known for their snazzy bearskins. During the Befreiungskrieg the term also applied to the third infantry battalion within a Prussian lineregiment, providing organic light infantry support.

                      Gardedu Korps – A German term usually denoting the senior heavy cavalry regiment ofthe army, normally an elite formation and often part of the monarch’s personal guard.

                      Garde Nationale – France’s reserve or militia establishment first formed during the Revolution to maintain public order. During the Befreiungskrieg, French LigneRegiments 135 and higher were formed directly from National Guard cohorts.

                      Gendarmes– From the French denoting “gentlemen at arms,” this normally referred to military police.

                      Grenadiers– Originally this term referred to troops whose size, intelligence and courage made them ideal candidates for hurling heavy grenades at the enemy. By the Napoleonic era they were simply elite troops afforded the toughest missions while encouraging their mates to new heights of valor.

                      Grenz– German for “border,” this term refers to the Hungarian manned border infantry regiments that secured the Austrian frontier with the Ottoman Empire. Given they operated in such broken terrain, they were used as light infantry when supporting the main Austrian army.

                      Grognards– French for “grumblers or whiners,” they initially referred to Napoleon’s Old Guard infantry, but later to the French army’s personality as a whole.

                      Guards– Guard infantry, cavalry and artillery units were originally created to provide security for the monarch, evolving in most armies to an elite reserve.

                      Highlanders– Elite British Regiments of Foot recruited exclusively from the Scottish highlands, it’s most famous three regiments being the kilted 42d (Black Watch), 79th (Cameron) and 92d (Gordon) Highland Regiments.

                      Horse Artillery – This was artillery created specifically to support mounted formations, having guns of a smaller caliber and all personnel mounted on horses. Austria, however, mounted the gunners of her “fast foot” artillery on a sausage like seat slung atop the trail of the gun, thus the name “Wurstwagon.”

                      Horse Grenadiers – This term referred to the senior heavy cavalry regiment of Napoleon’s Imperial Guard. The French term is Grenadiers a Cheval.

                      Household Cavalry – Britain’s guard cavalry establishment, consisting of the 1st and 2dLife Guards, which were normally brigaded with the blue uniformed Royal Horse Guards, the senior and only Heavy Horse regiment not converted to dragoons.

                      Hussars– Elite light cavalry taken from a Hungarian term (we think) meaning “one out of ten.” This was the conscription requirement needed to man such regiments, originally formed for use against the Ottomans. Think Captain Jack Sparrow with a spiffier uniform and foreign accent. Antoine Count de LaSalle putting it all in perspective by declaring that, “a hussar who is not dead by 30 is a jackass!” He was shot dead at 34 in 1809.

                      Jaegers (properly Jaeger zu Fus) – German for “hunters,” referring to light infantry formations in both Russian and German service, the latter often rifle armed.

                      JaegerGrenadiers – German for “light infantry grenadiers,” the term refers to RussianJaeger regiments so designated for distinguished service in the 1813-14 campaign against France.

                      Jaeger zu Pferd – German for “mounted hunters,” the term refers to generic Russian light cavalry from 1812 onwards, as well as Prussian volunteer light cavalry detachments attached to regular cavalry regiments to provide additional scouting capacity.

                      Inhaber– German for “proprietor,” the term was used in Austria and other German states to denote a noble appointed by the monarch as the colonel commanding of a regiment, thus responsible for its training and maintenance using state funds.

                      King’sGerman Legion – The KGL was an excellent German corps in service to Britain, being composed almost entirely of former Hanoverian soldiers dismissed after Napoleon conquered that small state.

                      Krakus– Polish irregular light cavalry, similar to Cossacks.

                      Landwehr– German for “militia,” designating in Prussian and Austrian, poorly trained troops hastily raised from those considered either too young or too old for normal military service.

                      Legere– French for “Light,” referring to formally named light infantry regiments within the French army.

                      Leib– German for “Life,” this title identified a formation as having a formal relationship with the monarch, often due to previous distinguished service, re: Leib Grenadier Regiment.

                      Licorne– French for “Unicorn,” this was a Russian semi-howitzer with a conical bore, four in each 12 gun battery. They received their name from the design of the lifting handles which referred to the arms of former Russian Chief of Artillery Count Petr Shuvalov.

                      Light Dragoons – In the British army the theoretical equivalent of French Chasseurs a Cheval, though more apt to cross sabers given their mounts were as large as those of the dragoons.

                      Ligne– French for “Line,” referring to line regiments, traditionally designated because their soldiers were drilled well enough to fight in a battleline. Other countries referred to them as Line Infantry, while in Britain they were Regiments of Foot.

                      Middle Guard – Regiments of Napoleon’s Imperial Guard consisting of distinguished soldiers from both the line and Young Guard, with officers and NCOs from the senior Guard regiments.

                      Old Guard – The senior regiments of Napoleon’s Imperial Guard, selected almost exclusively on merit.

                      Reserve Regiments – In Prussia the units raised in 1813 per the Krumper (German for “to clump”) system. This system allowed Prussia to avoid treaty obligations with France by continuously drafting (then releasing) soldiers through its 12 regular infantry regiments, thus building a large, drilled manpower pool for mobilization.

                      Rifle Regiments – British, specifically the 95th (Rifle) and 5th Battalion, 60th (RoyalAmerican) Regiments. Excellent skirmishers, as were British Light Regiments.

                      Schutzen– German for “sharpshooter,” this was a light infantry designation similar to Jaeger, often rifle armed.

                      Tirailleur– French for “light infantry,” normally implying Young Guard infantry. The name denoted junior status (as light infantry was originally composed of younger, more agile soldiers), not light infantry functionality.

                      Velites– This term is nearly indefinable but generally means junior troops of some sort within a guard formation. The Velites of Napoleon’s Guard Chasseurs a Cheval were, for example, young men from the privileged classes whose parents actually paid for their recruitment into the elite formation.

                      Voltigeurs– Yet another French term for light infantry, also designating Young Guard infantry, but again primarily due to their junior status as opposed to any sort of specialized light infantry function.

                      Uhlans– German, from Polish, for “lancers,” this term designated mounted lancer units within the Austrian, Prussian and Russian armies, as well as the Polish Grand Duchy of Warsaw

                      Young Guard – Junior units of Napoleon’s Imperial Guard drawn from outstanding soldiers of each year’s conscription class, officers and NCOs from the senior Guard regiments.
                      One of these.
                      This naming convention bridges earth's past with earth's PS2 based future.
                      I love these !

                      |

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Outfit Names

                        You know for NC sense they are suppose to be a rebellion and most likely civilians who have taken up arms. These two really stand out for them.

                        Landwehr– German for “militia,” designating in Prussian and Austrian, poorly trained troops hastily raised from those considered either too young or too old for normal military service.

                        FreiKorps– German for “volunteer corps,” this term refers to infantry and cavalry formations raised, drilled and equipped at personal expense by patriotic nobles of several German states. They were quite effective as mobile raiding detachments.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Outfit Names

                          To Foreign sounding for me! ;)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Outfit Names

                            Since the Terrans are red, how about

                            "The Scarlet Pimps" :p


                            I like Warlab's idea, of using old designations for a future game. We could pick a name that that sounds well, and communicates somthing of the organizing and fighting style, something like some royal guard, or skirmishes. Well I like the idea of tying history into it more than anything specific.


                            I would like, and maybe it would be most fitting for the New Conglomerate, to use the term cooperative, referencing the early socialist (and current) alternative to the corporation. Sounds like I'm describing the difference between the Terran faction and NC. I imagine a group that split off from the terran faction and had to build up an alternative way of organising, might look at socialist organisation principles for inspiration.

                            "The Tacticalgamer Cooperative(TC)",
                            "The Tacticalgamer Organic Terraforming Auraxis Cooperative (TOTAC)",
                            "The Tacticalgamer Proletarian Pirate Cooperative (TPPC)",...
                            *The name "New conglomerate" sort of points in the direction of more socialist inspired organisation/ideology.


                            For Terran, It is Terran Republic right? So how about "Tacticalgamer Republican Guard"? In most armies these are the best trained most loyal, most organized, and best trained soldiers that are called on for the most vital matters (for better or worse). I think republican guard would be fitting for a republic of the terran type, and this would also fit well with the idea of the primer, as would the idea of a cooperative in my thoughts for NC above. I think in fact any name should in some way be synchronous with the primer, as a matter of honor, and public relations.



                            Then for Vanu. I don't know much about their story yet. But I have thoughts for a direction again; since Vanu emphasize technology and progression, I think something relating to science might fit smartly. For example,

                            The Tacticalgamer Saraswati Ecumenical Research Initiative (TSORI - has a nice sort of japanese style strong sound to it which I like)"
                            Saraswati being the hindu godess of knowledge, learning, wisdom (~primer)



                            In conclusion:
                            In a general sense, I think it would be very nice if the names for the TG ......*had to stop writing because a venn diagram powered graph will be more effective than words at this point in spacetime*....it's graphtime!









                            That is all. I can't believe this game has me discussing this kind of thing lol. How do they do that?!?
                            Last edited by BigGaayAl; 07-11-2012, 05:35 PM.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Outfit Names

                              I don't want to try and force Tactical Gamer into the names, kinda limits the options. I'd rather have unique names followed by tags something like "Republican Guard|TG|"

                              Comment

                              Connect

                              Collapse

                              TeamSpeak 3 Server

                              Collapse

                              Advertisement

                              Collapse

                              Twitter Feed

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X