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Compensating for client-side hit detection and lag

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  • Compensating for client-side hit detection and lag

    I think we all have something of an idea of the implications of client-side hit detection, but this video provides some good thoughts and examples.



    He's got some interesting thoughts about creating initiative to remove the enemy's advantage, and looking after your "echo". Remember that an enemy coming towards you will likely have a fraction of a second advantage on you. In effect, when you rush into a room, you are invisible for a fraction of a second, depending on connection speeds.

    One of the most noticeable places this effects me is when I am driving armour. When the enemy is lobbing shells from a distance, I used to wait until the last minute to move out of the way, however over time I realized that I was still getting hit a lot despite the rockets missing on my screen. Over time I learned to start my dodge a half-second early to avoid this, but I never really thought of it in terms of an "echo" of my vehicle.

    I've been driving the Harasser a lot lately, and I've noticed this a lot when flanking enemy armor. When I'm circling a magrider, I need to keep further ahead of his turn rate than it actually appears to me. It also means I need to be more diligent about getting out of dodge. I need to leave before what appears to me to be the last possible moment, because leaving at the last possible moment for me is actually sticking around too long on his screen.

    Thoughts?
    Teamwork and Tactics are OP


    Strait /strāt/ (Noun) A narrow passage of water connecting two seas or two large areas of water: "the Northumberland Strait".

  • #2
    Re: Compensating for client-side hit detection and lag

    wow this explains allot actually....
    thanks

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    • #3
      Re: Compensating for client-side hit detection and lag

      As much as I appreciate this for a gaming point I really really like it from a physics point. We are playing games communicating at light speed and in effect we are dealing with, I think, a real tangible (if only approximate and also artificially exacerbated) form of time dilation.

      This is really cool. I hope this puts into reference all the 'X' faction gun is so OP! How'd he kill me so quick!

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      • #4
        Re: Compensating for client-side hit detection and lag

        It's one of the interesting implications of modern lag compensation. In older games you'd literally have to "lag lead" your shots in order to hit your targets, but on the flip side you'd always be accurate about how you were dodging. They've effectively reversed that relationship now, essentially delaying your movement on the server side so that the other guy has enough time to have an "accurate" version of where you are when they make the shot, leading to the "echo" effect.

        That's a gross oversimplification, and I'd probably need to draw a chart just to get my own mental model of it in place again (let alone properly explain it). It's been quite some time since I've needed to program lag compensation...



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        • #5
          Re: Compensating for client-side hit detection and lag

          Something I've noticed while playing is that roadkills do not appear to be client-side.

          Running with the rat patrol, often when running over enemies that are running parallel to me, I will pass right through them without hitting them. However if I drive just in front of them I DO get the roadkill. I'll also frequently drive close by enemy infantry, not appearing to hit any, then receive kill notices after the fact.
          Teamwork and Tactics are OP


          Strait /strāt/ (Noun) A narrow passage of water connecting two seas or two large areas of water: "the Northumberland Strait".

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          • #6
            Re: Compensating for client-side hit detection and lag

            I suspect it's kinda the same effect there, but playing in reverse because now you're using your position instead of your weapon to deal damage. That is, your vehicle is lagging BEHIND where you think it is, so you actually run over them a split second after you think you have.

            It's the same effect in play as when I buzz Randy's Galaxy in my Reaver by passing "just ahead of him" in a "daring and precise maneuver" that results in a "heinous fireball" and bitter recriminations.



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            • #7
              Re: Compensating for client-side hit detection and lag

              Yep, kind of like what SS said; this is also why you think you are flying (or driving) along next to somebody, or think you have safely passed that pedestrian crossing the road (while driving your vehicle) only to crash into somebody or kill said pedestrian, seemingly out of nowhere. This is why you keep your spacing at 50 meters when flying in formation.

              I also fly very close to, and use the ground for cover when flying the Gal and frequently continue taking fire from an enemy in a known location, even after I have maneuvered to put a hill or mountain between he and I! Same thing, he can still see my "ghost" and therefore keeps damaging it for another moment, even though there is now a hill between us.
              "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." - George Bernard Shaw



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              • #8
                Re: Compensating for client-side hit detection and lag

                Helps to explain why PS2 favors aggressive charges over defense positions or retreating under fire. By the time you can react to a charging aggressor entering your FoV, he has already seen and shot you.
                In game handle: Steel Scion
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