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Principles for Interior Defense / Defending Rooms

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  • Principles for Interior Defense / Defending Rooms

    Summary of Argument: 3 Principles of Interior Defense
    If you do not have time to read this whole wall of text, you can read this summary to get the gist. I hope some of you will have the patience to read the whole thing. If you have time and will read the whole thing then, SKIP TO the INTRODUCTION. If you want the short version, here is the summary, listing the principles and the conclusion.

    I believe by observing simple principles TG players can be much more effective at defending a room or the interior of a building than the average player. TG squad leaders should therefore use these principles when applicable to defend capture points and other important rooms.
    My first principle is Defenders should stay very close together, thus allowing for mutual support.
    My second principle is Defenders should sit still and remain stationary whenever possible, thus preventing friendly fire, maximizing accuracy, and ensuring no gaps in the defense.
    My third principle is Defenders should coordinate their coverage, thus preventing surprise and gaps in the defense.

    In summary, pick one entrance or angle to cover, sit still near some friends while covering it, do not move and continue to watch that direction, and tell your friends you are covering it so they can look elsewhere.

    To apply these principles a TG squad leader might order his squad:
    "All right squad, we are going to defend this room. Everyone come stand right here by me! I mean right on me. Right here in this corner." <Wait for people to arrive at the squad leader. Right with him, not in the same room.>
    "OK great. Now 1,2,3, cover that door on our right. 4,5,6, cover that other door to our left. Guys in the front crouch, medics, try to get behind someone." <Waits a second for guys to get in position.>
    "Ok, we are all set. Now no one move. Excellent team! Let them come and we will mow them down!"

    Note how very simple the basics of this plan are: 1.) Everyone stand together, 2.) Everyone cover an exit, 3.) Everyone be still. Even the newest Rank 1 planetside player could understand these commands and obey them. That is why I bothered to spend all this time writing this -- this plan is simple enough to work. Feel free to try it next time you are squad leading! Just make sure to pick a position away from doors and windows. Let them come inside to you and see what happens.




    I. Introduction
    While defending bases in Planetside and in other games, I have come to believe in some general principles that seem to me to help with effective defense inside buildings. Say defending a flag room in many games, or a capture point in planet side2. These are particularly relevant to PS2 because in PS2 attacking a base involves defending several capture points is necessary. Therefore defensive ideas have application both to defense and to offense in PS2, unlike some other games.
    My goal here is to talk about principles that will apply no matter what classes are in a squad. I am not trying to set out an ideal defensive strategy, or a “perfect room defense formula.” I know there are some basic ideas about defense in PS2, such as “MAXes with shields are good on defense” and “Engineer turrets are very good at mowing down infantry indoors!” Both these observations are true. But I am ignoring them because they presuppose you will have MAXes or Engineers on hand. I am trying to observe the KISS method and assume nothing except you have a squad defending a room. (Could be all infiltrators, or all heavy infantry, doesn’t really matter.) Two reasons for this approach: 1.) TG works with a lot of blueberries who don’t have the patience for anything complicated involving specific classes, so simple ideas are workable, complicated ones are not. 2.) In the midst of battle you will likely not have time to reequip and get the perfect class loadouts for the squad.

    For each principle of defense I will first describe how it is generally helpful in all games, then describe how it applicable to PS2, then provide further detail on how to execute it in PS2.

    My first principle is Defenders should stay very close together, thus allowing for mutual support.

    My second principle is Defenders should sit still and remain stationary whenever possible, thus preventing friendly fire, maximizing accuracy, and ensuring no gaps in the defense.

    My third principle is Defenders should coordinate their coverage, thus preventing surprise and gaps in the defense.

    The quick and dirty summary version of this whole four page document about principles of defense is: Pick one entrance or angle to cover, sit still near some friends while covering it, do not move and continue to watch that direction, and tell your friends you are covering it so they can look elsewhere.



    II. List of Principles and Discussion in Depth

    Principle #1: Defenders should stay very close together, thus allowing for mutual support.

    General Principle: Defending force has the advantage in organization, if they use it. An attack is a chaotic endeavor. Even if the attacking force begins the maneuver as an organized group, their organization is often disrupted by movement (spreading into a column) or casualties (creating gaps in their force). So by the time they arrive at their objective they are somewhat spread out and less cohesive. The defending force is the opposite. The defending force has relative safety and no need to move. They may even have 30 seconds to get ready before the next attack. Therefore a defending force can concentrate itself in cohesive units to maximize mutual support.

    Applied to Planetside2: If a defensive force stays tightly around a point to be defended, they cannot be picked off one by one. Medics can heal or revive those who are killed, and engineers can resupply easily without trouble. Front guys can crouch, thus allowing others to shoot over their heads (crouching also improves accuracy in many games, not sure about PS2).

    Execution: Players must stay very close together. How close is close? Very close. Close orders drill close. The standard is roughly “can you touch the player next to you with your virtual hand? Yes? Good.” So close that one ammo pack dropped in the middle can refresh the whole squad with no one moving. The medic should not have to run more than two steps to reach any squad member. This might be slight exaggeration, but only slight. In short, I mean pretty darned close.
    It is NOT enough to be in the same room. Many players misunderstand what close means, and why I truly mean in arms reach close. They think, “I am in the right building, what’s the problem?” They have some logic, so I will defend my position here. (pun intended)
    I have several reasons why being in the same general area is not good enough.
    Reason 1: Anyone not in arms reach can be picked off by an enemy which the main friendly force does not have a line of sight on and cannot engage. (For example the enemy is shooting from outside and a window allows them to shoot part of the room without entering.) This means that the defending force is weakened by one player and cannot return fire without moving to a move exposed position.
    Reason 2: Anyone not with the main group blocks the group’s line of fire, thus lessening their firepower. Keeping everyone very tightly together ensures the lines of fire are clear for everyone, thus maximizing firepower. A man who is even 10 steps in front of the rest of the group blocks the line of fire for part of the group. This is the reason why for generations infantry forces have used the “line” formation in battle: it maximizes their firepower because no one is ahead of anyone else.
    Reason 3: Keeping the main force close together allows grenades, rockets, mines, MAX shotguns and other area of effect weapons to be used on the “no man’s land” in front of them without fear of hitting friendlies.
    Reason 4: Keeping the force together prevents medics from risking their lives saving people who died away from the group. If one man is killed within 5 feet of the medic he can quickly be revived. If he dies far away the squad may lose more players when it tries to help the wounded/killed man. If a medic goes down heroically trying to save someone who died in an unsafe position, the person who killed him is not the enemy who shot him, but the friendly stupid enough to die in an exposed position. (This includes MAXes, who the medic will almost certainly risk his/her life to save.) This basic problem happened to me so many times, in so many different games, I have lost count. It is bad to get yourself killed, it is worse to kill yourself and your medic.

    In summary, I mean very very very close. I am not exaggerating when I say that. It only works if you stay truly just about arms reach from each other. The squad need not be in one group of 12, it could also be in 2 groups of 6. More division than that is bad. Remember, the phrase “divide and conquer” refers to dividing your enemies forces, while keeping yours together. Being in the same room is NOT enough.


    Principle 2: Defenders should sit still and remain stationary whenever possible, thus preventing friendly fire, maximizing accuracy, and ensuring no gaps in the defense.

    General Principle: A stationary defender has nothing to distract him from watching his assigned sector or likely enemy approach. He knows any movement he sees will be enemy, not friendly. He knows he can spray freely without worry of hitting friendly forces. He is vigilant, he is ready when the attacker approaches, and his weapon is steady.

    Applied to Planetside2: The General Principles section applies directly to PS2. In playing PS2, even with TG, I often see a group defending a position by constantly running around it. (Running from window to window, door to door all the time.) This creates gaps in the defense, as several players may be concentrated at one door, or moving between doors at once. An enemy who enters a door which no one is watching can take out a player or two before anyone knows what happened. In contrast to a running around player, a PS2 player who knows he is supposed to sit in one spot and watch this door/wiondow, let’s call it Door A, and does so, will be ready when someone comes through that door. The whole squad knows for certain that Door A is covered, and can watch some other door.

    Execution: When defending a room, do not run from window to window, door to door, trying to watch every avenue of approach yourself. This is impractical, as no one has eyes in the back of their virtual head and worse it prevents any real awareness. Pick your defensive position and stay there until you leave the room or there is some compelling reason to relocate. If possible, combine this with principle one (I) and get in a position near some friendlies. Do not move other than to avoid imminent death. (Such as a grenade landing in your midst or incoming rocket.) A player who is moving, and has other friendlies moving around him or her, will take a second longer to spot an enemy. If you and all the friendlies around you are still, any movement is instantly spotted by everyone, and can instantly be engaged. This does not mean you cannot look around, but do so by rotating your character, not by moving to a new position.


    Principle 3: Defenders should coordinate their coverage, thus preventing surprise and gaps in the defense.

    General Principle: If there are three doors to a room and three defenders, they can ensure their mutual safety by each watching one door. That way whatever door the enemy comes through will be guarded, and whoever is engaged will have time to shout an alarm to the other two. This means that the defending force cannot be surprised. In some games we call this principle “Keeping 360 degree security,” meaning we have someone watching each direction and so the group is safe.

    Applied to Planetside2: Defending players in PS2 often focus their attention on wherever the attackers came from last. This means abandoning entrances which were not recently attacked which creates gaps in the defense, and allows the defending force to be surprised and flanked. Only by trusting each other to cover the other entrances can we be safe.

    Execution: Foot soldiers can call out positions they are covering. (“I have the south door covered!” “Ok, if you have the south door, then I will cover the north door!”) Squad leaders can step up and assign positions or entrances to be covered. (“1, 2, and 3, cover the stairway, the rest of you cover the front door!”) If enemies attack any entrance, the people assigned to watch it should quickly let the rest of the team know, so they can help repulse the attack if needed. Tight squad level communications are key here. If one side is hit hard, so hard they need help from players assigned to other entrances, those players should help, but as soon as the fight is over return to their assigned positions and resume watching their assigned doors.





    III. Benefits of Using Principles: The benefits of defense by staying close together, not moving, and coordinating a defense are simple, but effective.
    * Friendlies are ready and alert, waiting for the enemy to appear.
    * The defending force is very difficult to surprise or flank.
    * Friendly fire is minimized, as friendlies are stationary and everyone can shoot freely.
    * Concentration of fire is maximized because the group can engage as one. Any single enemy entering the room can be engaged by multiple friendlies simultaneously and cannot easily decide who to shoot.
    * Friendlies cannot be picked off one by one, by a MAX or other enemy force which has line of sight on one friendly but not others.
    * Friendlies are easily reachable by the medic and engineer if injured, or low on ammo. Revive grenade maximized.




    VI. Risks and limitations:
    Risk: Enemy grenades and c4 are a risk, but quick reaction and movement, then reforming, can minimize damage.

    Limitation: These ideas will not work all the time. For instance, on capture points which are outdoors and thus subject to armor or air bombardment.
    I should also note that movement and counter attacks are extremely important parts of real warfare, and virtual warfare. The squad leader will have to decide when these ideas are best applied. However, I think in a lot of interior defense circumstances they have real merit.




    VI. Conclusion: This plan is simple to apply and to obey.

    This long write up may seem complicated but at its core it is very simple to apply as a squad leader.

    To apply these principles a TG squad leader might order his squad:
    "All right squad, we are going to defend this room. Everyone come stand right here by me! I mean right on me. Right here in this corner." <Wait for people to arrive at the squad leader. Right with him, not in the same room.>
    "OK great. Now 1,2,3, cover that door on our right. 4,5,6, cover that other door to our left. Guys in the front crouch, medics, try to get behind someone." <Waits a second for guys to get in position.>
    "Ok, we are all set. Now no one move. Excellent team! Let them come and we will mow them down!"

    Note how very simple the basics of this plan are: 1.) Everyone stand together, 2.) Everyone cover an exit, 3.) Everyone be still. Even the newest Rank 1 planetside player could understand these commands and obey them. That is why I bothered to spend all this time writing this -- this plan is simple enough to work. Feel free to try it next time you are squad leading! Just make sure to pick a position AWAY FROM doors and windows. Instead, let them come inside where you are waiting for them.


    I invite anyone’s thoughts or comments on these ideas. Please try to keep it on topic though: defending the interior of buildings.

    TG is getting better guys. Lets keep it going and pool our thinking!
    Last edited by Garthra; 10-21-2013, 04:44 AM.
    The question foremost in my mind is "what will bring the most tactical fun to the server?"

  • #2
    Re: Principles for Interior Defense / Defending Rooms

    I agree with you in principle Gartha, but there are aspects of PS2 that lend themselves to more discussion.

    Principle 1: The very nature of quick respawn becomes a problem. If the enemy rushes into a room (foolish yes) and sees a tight knit group of guys defending the point, doorway, entrance, etc, then during respawn he pulls a grenade launcher that works via arc (since a lot of capture points are on the second floor, he is out of line of sight) and does massive damage to the group when re-entering the room. If the enemy is organized, he informs his team of formation and several pull grenade launchers and concussion grenades and capture the point fairly quickly.

    The other principles I totally agree with.

    Another thing to consider is the entrances themselves, on Bravo point in a Bio-Lab the shield gen room (a point to secure while taking a Bio-lab) has 6 entrances, point platform in a Tech Plant has 8. The question isn't one of how do you locked down every entrance, but how do you prevent a rush attack if you don't?

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Principles for Interior Defense / Defending Rooms

      Rageq3a,

      Regarding the UGL and principle #1:
      I have not used the under barrel grenade launcher (UGL) and was not familiar with how effective it can be against infantry. It is a weakness in the first principle I agree. My best counter arguments are that the UGL has a minimum range (minimum number of rotations) and is indirect (has a relatively high arc) both of which limit its usefulness indoors where combat is tight and ceilings can be an issue with arced rounds. Also I think the number of players using UGLs is a minority, so in most fights (more than 51%) the concentration is still a good strategy even assuming UGLs are a very effective counter.

      That being said, I think you have made a very good point that an expert with one of those can do real damage to a tightly grouped defense force. The UGL is potentially a real counter to the strategy I have outlined, when it is used in an expert manner.

      Rage, the 100th time, I am glad you are on our side! I would hate to play another faction with you online. I will have to look at certing up the UGL for my engineer! :)


      Regarding rooms with multiple entrances:
      Yes, I agree, rooms with many entrances are tough to hold, and I think that these principles will help us hold them better. The idea is that by staying together, indoors (out of direct fire from windows/doors), stationary, and coordinated, defending such a room is at least possible. Otherwise there are unavoidable and lethal gaps in the coverage.
      The question foremost in my mind is "what will bring the most tactical fun to the server?"

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Principles for Interior Defense / Defending Rooms

        When your on sometime let me know and we'll go to VR training and I'll show what the UBGL can do in someone's hands. Then we'll go to the building at the back of any warpgate and I'll show you in the buildings there. The UBGL can be an effective counter against a tight knit group of guys, but can also be an effective weapon for securing them. If the group which is holding a single point were to move out slightly so that their view is anyone coming up the stairs, then a well placed grenade stops their advance as well as anyone behind them.

        With the way PS2 (and the players) operate you almost have to lock down all of the entrances. What happens is that when resistance is encountered, you have a group of guys that will for whatever reason respawn and continue to run headlong into a doorway to get killed over and over again. Eventually pooling up outside said door. Then you have another group of guys that will see what is happening and start to look for another way in with less resistance. Why?.........because the enemy isn't that different than us, if they think they can get easy kills they start to pool up defending the doorway that our guys are running headlong into and leaving the other doorway 'less guarded'. What I tell the pubbies when I'm soloing is to form up in 2 man fireteams on the entrances. It would be nice to be able to explain vectored firing angles (so they don't shoot each other) and roaming medics to them but that isn't going to happen. For locking down a entrance myself I use the 'jackhammer' set on 3 burst mode. At 112x3 damage for short range it cuts them down quick. Crouched down on either side of the doorway out of sight from incoming enemy, an Engy with a UBGL which can see further out the doorway to lay suppression fire.........and you have a room sealed tighter than Fort Knox. Why the jackhammer...........fast reload time, holds 12 cartridges per mag, 3X burst auto, 1 sec reload for next 3X burst, 1 burst per kill on infantry but only useful at CQC.

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Principles for Interior Defense / Defending Rooms

          Rage,
          I just tried out the UGL indoors a bit. You are right, it is a very effective weapon indoors. My earlier counter arguments about its minimum range and high arc being a problem indoors were wrong. Although I will have to wait a few days to test it out fully, preliminary testing show I was wrong, you were right. Score 1 Rage, Score 0 Garthra. :)
          The question foremost in my mind is "what will bring the most tactical fun to the server?"

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Principles for Interior Defense / Defending Rooms

            Thank you but it's not a matter of scoring my friend, I just want us to be the best we can be with the available information that's all.

            I actually use those buildings at the back of the warpgate to test theories and tactics. They are good representations of what you will run into while in game.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Principles for Interior Defense / Defending Rooms

              Originally posted by Rageq3a View Post
              I agree with you in principle Gartha, but there are aspects of PS2 that lend themselves to more discussion.

              Principle 1: The very nature of quick respawn becomes a problem. If the enemy rushes into a room (foolish yes) and sees a tight knit group of guys defending the point, doorway, entrance, etc, then during respawn he pulls a grenade launcher that works via arc (since a lot of capture points are on the second floor, he is out of line of sight) and does massive damage to the group when re-entering the room. If the enemy is organized, he informs his team of formation and several pull grenade launchers and concussion grenades and capture the point fairly quickly.

              The other principles I totally agree with.

              Another thing to consider is the entrances themselves, on Bravo point in a Bio-Lab the shield gen room (a point to secure while taking a Bio-lab) has 6 entrances, point platform in a Tech Plant has 8. The question isn't one of how do you locked down every entrance, but how do you prevent a rush attack if you don't?
              I think that sticking to a single door is optimal, but using the buddy system should be used resposibly; you cant be sitting on top of each other holding hands yes, but typically people are far enough apart that a grenade wont kill more then one guy so this works.


              On the bio lab building with the sheild gen , called the power house, yes there are 6 doors but many are in close proxemity. Here is an image of it http://www.squadside.com/wp-content/...ouse-1-011.jpg

              The three doors at the end of the large stairway can be covered from one position, the top of the large stairs. The two doors near the flag are both leading to open walkways that you can hit from eith door and the last door near the gen and by the small stairs is thr last to be covered. So actually 6 doors turn into three , which are then further limited by the direction the spandex are comming from... some times.
              SPEAK UP! and lets combat the fog of war together.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Principles for Interior Defense / Defending Rooms

                First of all welcome to the outfit Ryker, I agree with your assessment regarding the 'power house' (in game it's called the 'gen room'). If you watch the mission unfold though, you'll find anywhere from 50% to 75% of the people covering doorway #4. This leaves large gaps in coverage from infantry flanking the other positions which the enemy WILL do once they realize that doorway #4 can not be breached. A smart enemy squad will actually re-deploy to an outlier base and teleport to a flanking position. I'm constantly calling out in proxy to cover the other doorways, sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn't. When it works and all position are covered then the gen room is secure and the enemy HAS to do a MAX crash on it. Prepping the doorways with C4 and/or having your own MAXs covering the doorways ends it pretty quick.

                In the post referred, the UBGL has been nerfed (in PU02) I believe) so only a direct hit is a 1 shot 1 kill. It can still be used as a suppressive device since no one in their right mind would want to go running head long in an explosive field. But for the most part, the UBGL is no longer the go to gun as it once was (luckily I got my Auraxium before it was nerfed).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Principles for Interior Defense / Defending Rooms

                  Another thing to keep in mind is that in that diagram, it demonstrates a lack of view on objective B (Gen). If a MAX push comes along, an Infil can easily get past while the MAXes suppress us while we are on the steps. Not to say this isn't a good idea though, it could work having two squad stacked on the gen and two other on the upper level, watching for a flank and overall good suppression.
                  Questions about those who deserve it!
                  "Remember, no survivors" -Myself and probably what explains my methods the most

                  Comment

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