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New Squad Training Exercise - Protect the VIP

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  • New Squad Training Exercise - Protect the VIP

    Version 1

    Run Down: Your squad lead is the VIP, squad members are the body guards. The goal of the exercise is to insert on a base, stay there as long as possible and accomplish as many secondary objectives as possible. Once the situation has gotten to a reasonable level of danger, the VIP may decide to extract.

    RULES:
    - Bodyguards may set a point-man, however the point-man may only speak as to when the squad is moving. Not where.
    -VIP decides which base to go to and transport method and insert point.
    - Once on base, squad must collectively (VIP + Point-Man have no say) decide where to go.
    - During transport, the VIP will only drop/load in when told to drop by the driver or someone designated to this specific role.
    - VIP cannot stay in one location for more than 120 seconds (barring extreme circumstance: ex.12 prowlers surrounding your position) (VIP has the call on whether a situation is "extreme" or not)
    - Evacs are a must and may be performed at all times. VIP calls when an evac may be initiated however the squad organizes the details of the evac.


    The Unwritten (but written) Rules:
    - VIP must do everything in his power to stay alive while following all above rules.
    - Should an argument arise (it shouldn't) it is the VIP's job to quell the disagreement and if necessary choose the next movement to get things back on track.
    -An evac doesn't HAVE to be a galaxy / sunderer pick - up. Simply, you can break contact and try your luck at running for the hills.



    TIPS: Some friendly tips to the bodyguards
    1. Move cover to cover. As individuals and as a squad. ( If you are in the front of the pack, slow to a walk or even post up and let the rest of the squad pass while you cover. If you are in the back, sprint until you are just behind the point-man.)
    2. This exercise is to test the squads ability to perform tasks with unclear and unfamiliar orders.
    3. Do not create a power struggle for what to do with the VIP. We are a team and teams form plans on the fly. Speed is key.
    4. Be clear when the VIP is moving. No assumptions are going to be made by the VIP.
    5. If squad loses members to the 20 second timer, don't just sit idle and dead, find a way to get back or start working on an extract plan.
    6. Know where you are going before you need to go there. 120 seconds goes by pretty quickly.
    7. Take things seriously.



    Version 2

    Run Down: The VIP is elderly, and will roam at his leisure. It is your job as a squad to maintain a safety perimeter around the VIP.

    RULES:
    - VIP will not notify squad about any movements or transport pulls.
    - VIP may only use a side arm and knife.
    - VIP may pull transportation at his leisure, the squad will have 10 seconds to load up in whatever is pulled. (The VIP will make reasonable efforts to bring transportation to majority of the squad)
    - Bodyguards will follow the following class list. (whatever your squad number is corresponds to this list.)
    1. VIP
    2. Heavy
    3. Heavy
    4. Engineer
    5. Medic
    6. Heavy
    7. Medic
    8. Heavy
    9. Medic
    10. Heavy
    11. Engineer
    12. Heavy
    Last edited by UltimateMuffinMan; 08-22-2017, 07:05 PM. Reason: Another change.

  • #2
    I will be doing one of these trainings this Tuesday, 8/8/17 @ 9pm EST.

    (Training will not happen if there are less than 8 participants)

    Comment


    • #3
      I have already played a couple times as a bodyguard in this scenario and I would like to give some quick input from that perspective.

      1. Although this is supposed to be fun, that doesn't mean goofing off. in my opinion the most fun aspect of this is taking it seriously and playing your role (just like any good TG squad)

      2. quite often the bodyguards (probably out of habit) started focusing on standard objectives at a base (i.e capture points, enemy assets, shield generators). The point of this exercise as I understand it (muffin feel free to correct) is more about improving squad play/cohesion as opposed to winning a base. It encourages the squad to work together as a whole and instead of just receiving orders and following them.

      3. In terms of actually capturing a base which can happen in the course of the exercise, I did notice that the enemy quite often seemed at a loss of what to do against us. If you think about it, every infantry scenario we put ourselves in, we almost always end up doing the same basic thing everytime--hunker down in a position and wait for the enemy. Whether it's on a point, or a forward position, or anywhere else, we essentially remain static until some event causes a situation change. But what I experienced with this tactic was a full squad moving around the base unexpectedly and unpredictably, not focusing on any one area, but remaining fluid. This means the enemy can't pin us down and overwhelm us, and we will end up distracting a good number of them from even going to the point.

      4. One of the most important abilities for the bodyguards to have is for decisions to be made collectively and quickly. The most important thing is not to get bogged down if we can help it. This means the whole squad is responsible for giving their own ideas, listening to others ideas, and agreeing to good ones quicly. If we get stuck for even 10-15 seconds arguing about whether we should grab a sundy, or move to a building, etc. we could easily find ourselves surrounded and no longer able to move.

      Final notes,
      I had a ton of fun doing this already and think it's an excellent way to improve as a whole. This is also a great way to practice specific maneuvers like Australian peel, squad formation during movement, responding to an ambush, setting up temporary perimeters, and other such things. Normally none of this is ever applicable since transit is normally in a gal or sundy, and when we get to a location we stay in one spot. Sorry the for essay, kudos if you read it all the way through, and any thoughts are welcome.

      Comment


      • #4
        We played this in CSS. Fun Mod. The VIP only could use a Handgun. And I think a knife also. The VIP was dressed as a civilian.
        In planetside I don't see the problem of them using any close range gun. ( I say it doesn't matter what gun because he is the vip that you have to follow his/her plan. And it could become a distraction to everyone if that detail isn't followed correctly.)

        The difference like you said though is they have Control until they are dead then a second in command must step up for this to work.
        Usually the guy with the plan. If that doesn't happen it will kill the game.



        FUN FUN

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Rybthod View Post

          2. quite often the bodyguards (probably out of habit) started focusing on standard objectives at a base (i.e capture points, enemy assets, shield generators). The point of this exercise as I understand it (muffin feel free to correct) is more about improving squad play/cohesion as opposed to winning a base. It encourages the squad to work together as a whole and instead of just receiving orders and following them.

          This is also a great way to practice specific maneuvers like Australian peel, squad formation during movement, responding to an ambush, setting up temporary perimeters, and other such things.
          There are more things you can learn in this exercise as well, but for the most part you hit the key areas this exercise focuses on.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by sparhawkxx View Post
            The difference like you said though is they have Control until they are dead then a second in command must step up for this to work.
            Usually the guy with the plan. If that doesn't happen it will kill the game.
            I see what you mean can go wrong with a decentralized command. I feel like it doesn't need to be said, but I added in a rule stating "Should an argument arise (it shouldn't) it is the VIP's job to quell the disagreement and if necessary choose the next movement to get things back on track." The VIP is the squad lead, it will be their job to make sure this exercise does not go down a road where someone may leave due to an argument. Should the decentralized leadership prove to be a problem (again it shouldn't) we can impose there be a "head bodyguard" who calls the shots.

            Comment


            • #7
              Its still a good idea. Missions on a smaller scale is still a mission that can be a lot of fun for all. The same fun if it was an alert or maybe a techplant or biolab fight. It brings it back to working well together for anything while watching each others back and the VIP. Maybe more fire teams in this case for you guys that like to leave the team behind so you have 7 on the VIP and the other 4 are for rescue and distraction or flanking purposes.

              If having a VIP means everyone is expendable off the bat, then you lose me again. We are not that good to be running elite squads. We just need to be able to make the call. And the fire teams will make that happen. In the end if we have a sick run you will have 1 or 2 guys left with the VIP. So Vip missions aren't an easy task if some others think they are. It all depends on the VIPs mission is all :)



              FUN FUN

              Comment


              • #8
                Sounds neat. I'll try to remember to show up!



                Comment


                • #9
                  Updated rules on Version 1.

                  Created rules for Version 2.

                  Comment

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