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  • [GUIDE] Static IP's and Portforwarding: Latency Reduction

    So rather than type everything up myself I have found a spot on guide for giving yourself a Static IP address. This is required for portforwarding. So before the link I will explain Dynamic IP's and Static IP's.

    Dynamic IP's are IP addresses asigned by a home router (typically.) Most home networks run using dynamic as there is no setup required, its all done by the router.
    Example: 3 computer house. When PC#1 is turned on it gets assigned IP 192.168.1.2. When PC#2 gets turned on it gets assigned IP 192.168.1.3. PC#3 gets turned on it is assigned IP 192.168.1.4. Now lets say PC#1 and PC#2 both get shut down and PC#3 remains on. Now lets say PC#2 gets turned on again. PC#2 will now have IP 192.168.1.2 because it is the first available IP to the router. Next PC#1 gets turned on and now has IP 192.168.1.3, while PC#3 has the same as before since it was never shut down.

    Static IP's are IP addresses that the network administrator assigned specific machines.
    Example: Same 3 computer household. When PC#1 is turned on it HAS IP 192.168.1.50. PC#2 gets turned on it HAS IP 192.168.1.96. PC#3 gets turned on it HAS 192.168.1.200. It wont matter if any machine gets turned off or on or whatever order they get turned on or off. Those IP's remain the same....or Static.

    So before you give yourself a static IP...think of how many machines connect to your router at any given time. Phones, printers, computers all get IP's if they connect to the router. So when you decide on a static IP make the last numbers (xxx.xxx.x.1 through 254) is above the HIGHEST possible number of simultaneous connected devices you can expect. Mine is set to .100 because there is no chance of me having 50+ devices so extra room doesn't hurt.

    So heres the link to the Static IP guide, keep in mind this is only for windows 7. You will need to find any differences if you use a different OS: portforward.com/networking/static-win7.htm

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    So now on to portforwarding...Port Forwarding is basiclly telling your router "any information coming through these ports xxxxxxxxx go straight to this IP." Reducing the time between your router deciding where the packets go, thus miniscule reduciton in latency there. Again there is
    already an excellent guide to this already typed up so I will link it below...or most of the link. Most games if you type "game name, port forwarding" will generally bring up a Game Owner forum post with a list of ports used. Those are the numbers you need to forward.

    Portforward guide: wikihow.com/Set-Up-Port-Forwarding-on-a-Router

    Just as an easy reference here is Planetside 2's ports to have forwarded.
    GM's post in its entirety:

    "This topic has come up several times, so here is a sticky highlighting the ports that the game uses so that you can update your routers/port forwards to successfully play the game.

    Launchpad, Patching, and our Web site/web stats are on the standard ports:
    HTTP (TCP-80)
    HTTPS (TCP-443)

    The PlanetSide 2 Game Client uses the following for login, character select, and the worlds/zones:
    UDP-20040 through UDP-20199

    Voicechat is a SIP based application, that can change and be dynamic. The initial SIP request will be made on:
    HTTPS (TCP-443)

    The actual voice communication is currently on (This can change dynamically):
    UDP-5062

    However please take note that the voice server is dynamic, it could change ports, but that port information will be relayed through the proxy on port HTTPS (TCP-443).

    So in summary, make sure the following are opened (Outbound), and if you are having difficulties make sure you have port forwards enabled for the UDP ports:

    HTTP (TCP-80)
    HTTPS (TCP-443)
    UDP-20040 through UDP-20199
    UDP-5062"


    If people find this guide useful I can do another in selecting the best DNS servers for your area further reducing latency.

    <3

    Regneir

  • #2
    Re: Static IP's and Portforwarding: Latency Reduction

    can I get a kid friendly version of this lol

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Static IP's and Portforwarding: Latency Reduction

      Any confusion I can try and clarify, any specific parts?

      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Static IP's and Portforwarding: Latency Reduction

        I've been having terrible connection recently, and if this will help might try it, but doesn't portforwarding expose your computer to the internet, making it more vulnerable? Part of the reason it does it the way it does is because of security, right? Or is that only when you host a server of some kind?
        Thanks in advance

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Static IP's and Portforwarding: Latency Reduction

          It does expose those ports, so any negative attack or phishing would be a little easier if it happened to be going through those. Ive been port forwarded on many games for several years now and havent had any issues like that. If the idea is a little off putting, I recommend doing the Static IP part at least (as that is a network setting and wont change security either way.) I will be doing another guide on DNS selection to reduce lag outside the home network.

          The IP and Port forward is merely to reduce the Internal network latency. What I mean by that is the latency between your PC and the router and modem, its usually not much but it mainly adds stability.
          External network I'm referring to your router communicating to the DNS.

          Network communication is something like this: PC ----Information heading to router---> Router ---Information being sent to Default DNS---> Modem --Info Passes through modem to head to DNS --> DNS ----Whatever server the DNS decides is the closest and start of the most efficient path----> Server ----Repeat as many times as determined by the DNS to reach destination ---> Destination ----> Response from destination follows same or similar path back to router and PC.
          Last edited by Regneir; 02-09-2015, 07:02 PM. Reason: Attempting clarity

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Static IP's and Portforwarding: Latency Reduction

            Just to provide a little clarification;

            Dynamic IPs - Also known as DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) is a system that is used not only in homes, but most corporate networks as well. It will introduce NO additional latency in a network connect as it is normally only used when the operating system first starts and needs to obtain an IP address. Once this is set, it should not change unless extenuating circumstances exist (router loses power and forgets DHCP tables). DHCP tables stay fixed even if a client goes away for a period of time. This is called the "lease" period and can usually be configured in your router but is normally set for ~24 hours. DHCP is convenient because you can set options on the router (in the DHCP Pool Configuration) that get set on all your clients when they get their IP, such as NTP source, default gateway, DNS settings, etc. Changing those values in your DHCP configuration then propagate down to all your individual machines. If you want to FORCE your machine to always have the same IP, yet get the other benefits of DHCP, most routers allow you to create a static assignment for a particular machine once it's on the network.

            DNS - No network traffic "passes through" DNS. When you access an Internet service using a fully qualified domain name (FQDN) such as www.tacticalgamer.com, your COMPUTER will send a query off to your ISP's name servers asking them to translate this into an IP address. Network traffic does not route using english names, but IP addresses, so your machine needs to obtain an IP address to begin establishing a connection with the service. Once your ISP's DNS resolvers provide the IP, this address is cached in your machine and does not need to be looked up again for a period of time (referred to as the Time-To-Live, or TTL). DNS does NOT determine the most efficient path to your destination (that's usually managed by BGP), although in some cases logic running behind the DNS servers may give you an IP address result that's nearby to you, it has no control whatsoever over routing of data. The best DNS servers in terms of latency are most likely the ones assigned to you by your ISP as they are "closer" to you than DNS servers on a remote network. There are advantages and disadvantages to using those DNS servers over alternatives; but those usually have to do with site blocking, privacy issues, or specific security concerns.

            Port Forwarding (And if it's necessary) - In most all cases you should not have to forward ANY ports. Port forwarding is designed for ingress protection (protecting your network from outside sources coming in) and not egress protection (protecting your network by limiting a client's ability to connect outbound to the Internet). Basically; you use port forwarding if you're trying to run a server on your INTERNAL network and you want to give the outside world access to that port. IE: You would forward port 80 to an internal IP address if you wanted to run a web server. This should really NOT be done with ports used for game clients, as it is completely unnecessary and may open up vulnerabilities in your network. In this modern day and age, firewalls are stateful, which means that your firewall is more than capable of understanding that return traffic referencing an existing connection is allowed. If you initiate a connection to the outside world, the traffic coming back is explicitly allowed.

            NOTE ON THE ABOVE: While this primarily applies to your home router/firewall, your local Windows firewall will behave differently depending on it's configuration. These firewall rule changes MAY need to be allowed in your Windows firewall if you're using highly granular rules, but generally they should not be needed and auto-generate. As different people set up their local firewalls in a wide variety of ways; I don't want to dig into that. But when you see these kind of "open these ports" type posts that talk about OUTBOUND traffic, look to your Windows firewall and NOT your router/firewall.
            Last edited by Apophis; 02-11-2015, 06:40 AM.
            Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Static IP's and Portforwarding: Latency Reduction

              Hostile much, merely stating my experience with it and the steps I've taken that have had actually had an effect.

              Firstly the Static IP part is only REQUIRED for port forwarding. So props on understanding the point of me including it there. /sarcasm

              The step 2 would have been DNS selection which as you mentioned is typically best by your ISP. However there is a wonderful little tool called DNSbench that will run test packets through DNS and give you response times of them as well as packet loss (primarily the point of the entire thing.) My ISP's default DNS was losing roughly 15% packets and switching has improved connectivity and overall speed.

              In addition I did answer above that port forwarding DOES expose risk and its up to the individual on whether or not to do it. Also to note it is typically common practice for a lot of people to port forward games as it does have an effect, as stated from my personal experience.

              So to summarize what we agree on and clarity sake:

              Port Forwarding does have risk (Only while the application in question that's been forwarded is running,) and does have an effect from my personal experience.
              Static IP's are REQUIRED to do the Port Forwarding, and as such is the ONLY reason its in this particular guide.
              Assigned DNS's are TYPICALLY your best option, HOWEVER there are instances where they are not THE BEST.


              Also thanks for the non-user friendly explanation on IP's. I may not have necessarily worded myself properly but I also was trying to keep it from being too technical for those who may not know (yeah people still dont know EVERYTHING.)
              Last edited by Regneir; 02-10-2015, 09:26 PM.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Static IP's and Portforwarding: Latency Reduction

                And a side note, if its so misleading and has no value what so ever then delete the thread and send me a PM. Pretty poor administrating which is surprising coming from a group of people who do it well and I tend to respect.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Static IP's and Portforwarding: Latency Reduction

                  Originally posted by Regneir View Post
                  And a side note, if its so misleading and has no value what so ever then delete the thread and send me a PM. Pretty poor administrating which is surprising coming from a group of people who do it well and I tend to respect.
                  Regneir,

                  My apologies as you are 100% correct. There was absolutely no need for me to reply the way I did, and it represented Tactical Gamer poorly. I understand you were simply trying to help others and there is really no excuse for my behavior. I sincerely apologize.

                  I have edited my original reply to get rid of what I never should have put there in the first place.
                  Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Static IP's and Portforwarding: Latency Reduction

                    Originally posted by Regneir View Post
                    Firstly the Static IP part is only REQUIRED for port forwarding. So props on understanding the point of me including it there. /sarcasm

                    The step 2 would have been DNS selection which as you mentioned is typically best by your ISP. However there is a wonderful little tool called DNSbench that will run test packets through DNS and give you response times of them as well as packet loss (primarily the point of the entire thing.) My ISP's default DNS was losing roughly 15% packets and switching has improved connectivity and overall speed.

                    In addition I did answer above that port forwarding DOES expose risk and its up to the individual on whether or not to do it. Also to note it is typically common practice for a lot of people to port forward games as it does have an effect, as stated from my personal experience.

                    So to summarize what we agree on and clarity sake:

                    Port Forwarding does have risk (Only while the application in question that's been forwarded is running,) and does have an effect from my personal experience.
                    Static IP's are REQUIRED to do the Port Forwarding, and as such is the ONLY reason its in this particular guide.
                    Assigned DNS's are TYPICALLY your best option, HOWEVER there are instances where they are not THE BEST.


                    Also thanks for the non-user friendly explanation on IP's. I may not have necessarily worded myself properly but I also was trying to keep it from being too technical for those who may not know (yeah people still dont know EVERYTHING.)
                    You are correct, static IPs are required for port forwarding. But in the case you've described, port forwarding should not be necessary at all. If you get to the point where you feel you NEED to forward ports, I would actually look elsewhere and try and determine the root cause that's preventing and/or causing conflicts in your firewall's ability to properly maintain state. It's very likely an issue with the root cause located on the workstation, not the firewall.

                    I have seen, and used, DNS Benchmark in the past. It is a useful tool to compare the performance of DNS servers, but in practice the DNS query itself happens well before any data is transmitted and once the lookup is complete, it is no longer a factor. If it takes a long time between when you type a FQDN in a browser and the time is takes your browser to start "Connecting", that's a sign of a DNS issue. But you'll also notice, once that first lookup is complete; everything tends to run fast. Your machine has already cached the results and is no longer relying on remote servers for resolution. The effect of this on gaming is nil. In your case, with your ISP dropping 15% of the packets, It's a really smart move to switch.

                    (One note about testing DNS; DNS lookups are performed over UDP, which is a connectionless protocol. You can use ICMP and send pings, but I've found them to be ultimately unreliable for anything other than determining if a remote machine is "there" or not. ICMP isn't a particularly important protocol for a provider to permit to their DNS infrastructure. It is always possible that the ISP doesn't prioritize ICMP at all, or even drops it at certain thresholds. Additionally; you can use tools that perform lots of recursive queries to measure performance, but ISPs also have the ability to throttle requests if they are coming in unnaturally fast. With numerous mitigation strategies available to the ISP to deal with various forms of denial-of-service, it's usually just a best-guess as to what's going on unless you have detailed knowledge of the ISPs infrastructure. But all things being equal, we can only test with what we have available, so best-guess is usually better than nothing.)

                    As far as port forwarding goes; depending on the ports you're forwarding, this is a persistent risk. The ports don't stop forwarding when the game is off, and those ports can be easily used for nefarious purposes. Without getting into all the crazy tech details, a malicious actor using AUTOMATED tools can identify the ports that are open, and then utilize those as covert channels for other malware. I know that sounds a bit extreme, it's not that you're being specifically targeted with this attack; but when an actor is scanning millions of IPs, this is just a great way for your address to float to the top for further inspection. Remember; common practice does not mean smart practice. Making the effects of the problem go away does not necessarily solve the problem. If the key in your front door is always getting stuck, one solution is to just leave the door unlocked; but the solution you're really looking for is powdered graphite.
                    Diplomacy is the art of saying "good doggie" while looking for a bigger stick.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Static IP's and Portforwarding: Latency Reduction

                      "You are correct, static IPs are required for port forwarding. But in the case you've described, port forwarding should not be necessary at all. If you get to the point where you feel you NEED to forward ports, I would actually look elsewhere and try and determine the root cause that's preventing and/or causing conflicts in your firewall's ability to properly maintain state. It's very likely an issue with the root cause located on the workstation, not the firewall."
                      Good stuff to know, using a bootleg Win 7 Ultimate so some options are a little limited in my case as no windows updates.

                      "As far as port forwarding goes; depending on the ports you're forwarding, this is a persistent risk. The ports don't stop forwarding when the game is off, and those ports can be easily used for nefarious purposes."
                      And I searched for a pretty long time on risks of it being persistent and nearly all answers were 'minimal.' But I suppose this does make sense, even though the port forward is labeled its not necessarily scanning the packets to make sure it matches...opposite in fact, green light all the way. So more risk than I realized.


                      I'm unsure of how to help the few guys suffering lag issues now as these few things are what changed my own. Would there happen to be a place to look for root causes for firewalls and such? I'm not really big on security, mainly there is nothing on my gaming rig I need to protect. But if there is a way to stabilize it so port forwarding isn't necessary in my case I would like to know where to look.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Static IP's and Portforwarding: Latency Reduction

                        Originally posted by Regneir View Post
                        [I]using a bootleg Win 7 Ultimate so some options are a little limited in my case as no windows updates.
                        This, IMO, is a massive security hole. And could be causing some (all?) of your problems. And it is an unnecessary risk to take, as fully legitimate copies are available to be downloaded through DigitalRiver. Although the links seem to be down again as of very recently, hopefully they will be back up soon.
                        "The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." - George Bernard Shaw



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