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Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

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  • Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

    Introduction:
    I have heard many complaints over the last few weeks about how long it takes to start missions.

    It has come to my attention that some players think we spend too long at the briefing screen. Other players think there is too much chatter at the briefing screen that is not related to the mission. I can see both complaints, although I think there is a counter argument to each. I am not blameless, and have certainly joked around at the briefing screen on occasion. I am disturbed that the briefing phase may be interfering with the tactical fun of Arma 2 TG.

    As a result, I have done some thinking about how to address these issues, and come up with one possible solution. There may be a way to restructure our briefings to help address both of these two issues. I am presuming, for the moment, that a change that addresses these two issues is indeed desirable. (This premise is open to debate.) I have one alternative, which I have largely stolen from ShackTactical’s playbook, and I give them full credit for it. I will note one exception to this plan: Missions that are inherently time sensitive, for instance, defense missions, where as soon as dysnc clears you are under the gun. In those missions, which are rare, more must be done at the briefing screen.



    The Plan



    Step 1: The Briefing Screen (KISS)

    The briefing screen is used only to allow the commander to 1.) set comsig, 2.) provide the barest outline of his plan, and 3.) provide general information about equipment to allow troops to equip themselves.

    For instance a commander might say the following: “We will be moving in a convoy from our start point at USA BASE number 5, to the objective in FeruzAbad. Convoy will be victor 1 Strykr, victor 2 M2 Humvee, victor 3 command Humvee. Our objective is to secure FeruzAbad, and locate the downed pilot. Squad 1 on 343 channel 1, squad 2 on 343 channel 2. Platoon net channel 1 long range, and channel 6 short range. Air support on channel 2 long range. Every soldier should have a) 1 of each medical supply, b.) earplugs/eye protection, c) weight under 35kg. We may have to move on foot, so be light enough to do that . . . Alright, take us in.”

    While commander is speaking, players should be reading notes, and looking at the briefing provided by the map maker. They should especially take note of which squad they are in, and the correct COMSIG for that squad.

    This is not the time for any player to ask any questions, or for the commander to lay out a plan in detail. I repeat, there is no reason, none, for any questions or concerns to be raised, except if the commander forgets to mention one of these three elements. (1. General outline of plan, 2. Comsig, 3. General information needed for soldiers to equip themselves and load equipment.) If the commander says all three of these, no one should speak at all. Merely having a question as to the details of one of those three elements is not sufficient reason to ask a question at the briefing screen. That is what the in game briefing is for.

    Step 2: Commander Briefing (Briefing in Depth) and Soldiers Kit Up

    Squad leaders, immediately upon dysnc being clear, are ordered to group up on the commander. The commander then, to the squad leaders, outlines his plan in more depth, and gives each squad its orders. Questions are asked by the squad leaders, and alternatives are discussed. (briefly) Squad leaders should limit their questions to only those directly and specifically pertinent to the mission at hand.

    While their squad leaders are being briefed, soldiers should equip themselves for battle, following the general equipment information given by the commander at the map screen. This is designed so that when squad leader returns and briefs his squad, they are ready to go within 30 seconds of the squad briefing. Although the squad leader may make changes to the load outs his men have selected, these should be minor and relatively uncommon. For instance, assigning someone to carry a fast rope, or redistributing a machine gunner’s ammo. Both of these issues can in fact be handled by FTLs or individual soldiers without intervention from the squad leader, provided the FTLs/privates are using their heads and communicating. This load out phase, and getting the men ready, is primarily the duty of the FTLs, and of the individual soldiers.

    Step 3: Squad Leaders Brief their Squads

    Squad leaders then return to their squads, which are still spread out at their different spawn points. When they arrive back at their squads (thus spread out from each other) they brief their squads on their role in the commander’s plan. Individual soldiers can ask questions of their squad leader at this time, to clarify their role, or the expectations of the leadership. When the squad is briefed, the squad leader reports that to the commander.

    Step 4: Final checks and changes
    Any last minute changes to loadout are made, and the squad leaders arm themselves at the box. Ideally, within 1 minute of the report of briefing complete, the squad is ready to move out. Again, soldiers should already have their personal kit completely ready, and vehicles should be loaded with whatever is generally needed, under orders from the FTLs. All players are doing now is last minute changes.


    What is Required by Map Makers for this Plan:

    SPACEING: Mission makers must start the force in squad sized groups that are very spread out. The entire system is designed around the idea that each squad be far enough from the others that they cannot hear direct chat from other squads, or if they can it is so soft it does not distract. This implies 100 meters of spacing between each squad at mission start. (That is, presume a 100 meter radius around EACH squad, into which no other unit can be placed.) The same rule is applied to the command squad. Without this spacing, the efficiency gained by each part of the force receiving only the information required for its own part of the mission, without distraction or delay from other portions of the briefing, is lost.

    MULTIPLE BOXES: Each squad, to be able to brief itself, and avoid the chaos of 20 voices talking to each other around the ammo box, must be given their own ammo box, located at their spawn location. This allows each squad to equip itself, and brief, all without distracting other squads.

    LIMITED RADIOS: There should be little or no way for an average private to gain a long range radio, except taking it off the dead body of his superior. (Exception: If he is the RCO, Recon, or in another element that requires a long range.) This keeps the long range net clear of unnecessary individual concerns. Remember, the commander is always dialed in to the long range net, and every word spoken on it distracts him from leading the operation. Allowing soldiers only short range radios forces them to address questions to their squad leader, as he is the only one they can reach, and really, the only one they should be able to reach.

    What is Required of Players:

    RESTRAINT: Players must think hard about whether a question or comment needs to be asked before asking it. The burden should be presumed to be on the person asking the question to prove that their question or comment has merit and is worth everyone’s time. This burden is higher the more people must listen to the question. For instance, at the briefing screen, the burden is nearly insurmountable. At the squad briefing, it is lower, but the burden is still on the private to make sure the question is relevant and timely. (Relevant= will help us accomplish the mission, timely = it should be asked now, and not later, in order to be useful.) When you are speaking only to your FTL or your fireteam, the burden is much lower.

    SPEED OFF THE BAT: Every soldier, FTL, Squad Lead, and Commander, must have in their mind that the goal is to get to combat quickly. As quickly as possible. When dysnc is clear, their goal should be to get ready to go, not in a leisurely way, but in a “good men are dying out there in battle and I need to get out there and help them NOW” way. This involves both speedy clicking in the box, and quick thinking. Even a private has to look at his gear, and that of other soldiers and think: “What should I carry for me? Should I help someone else carry their gear instead? Joe looks really heavy, let me take some of his SMAWs. What should I load into the vehicle, given everyone is loading stuff in, and space is not infinite? What should I load in given I do not have all day?”

    Benefits of this system:

    1. Avoids chatter at the briefing screen, where some comments are useful and pertinent to the mission, but many are not timely, even if they are useful.

    2. Creates a structure where squad leaders automatically have a moment to speak to their squad.

    3. Minimizes boredom while other players are discussing parts of the mission that are relevant to them, but not relevant to most of the force. (For instance, if I am a rifleman private in a ground convoy, why do I care what the flight path of the chopper borne troops will be? I don’t. Why do I care about the distribution of AT ammo in another squad? I don’t.)

    4. Allows multiple briefings to go on at once. Multiple discussions between FTLs and privates about ammo distribution while the commander is briefing the squad leaders, and multiple squad briefings afterward.

    5. Briefing is done in game, where players are not trapped idle, and can be gearing up or loading ammo into vehicles. This is superior to the briefing screen where every player is stuck sitting totally useless while one player’s question is answered. Using this method, only the player asking the question and the squad leader answering it are kept busy. Everyone else can be getting ready to move out.

    6. Questions are addressed to squad leaders, and not the commander. Often in our missions I see a barrage of questions directed at the commander at the start of the mission. Everything from “what is the chem light color?” to “what squad am I in?” The commander has other things to think about, and should not be burdened with such questions, that can be addressed to the FTL or squad leader.

    Conclusion:

    What I have laid out above is an alternative briefing method. I would like to solicit the comments of my fellow TG players on these ideas, stolen as they are from Shack Tactical. I would ask that our conversation avoids name calling or pettiness. I did not mean this as a condemnation of anyone, nor does it come from a place of frustration for me. I am simply trying to identify an issue that has been making the game less fun for some players and propose a solution. I hope we can retain that goal on this thread as we discuss.

    Thank you for taking the time to read this and consider it.

    Garthra
    Last edited by Garthra; 10-06-2012, 07:54 PM.
    The question foremost in my mind is "what will bring the most tactical fun to the server?"

  • #2
    Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

    I support this post. Great points.
    |TG-189th| Unkl
    ArmA 3 Game Officer
    Dean of Tactical Gamer University
    189th Infantry Brigade Member
    SUBMIT A RIBBON NOMINATION OR CONTACT AN ARMA ADMIN
    "We quickly advance in the opposite direction and take cover in a house on the SW side of town." - BadStache

    Comment


    • #3
      Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

      Awesome post, my particular favourite parts

      RESTRAINT: Players must think hard about whether a question or comment needs to be asked before asking it. The burden should be presumed to be on the person asking the question to prove that their question or comment has merit and is worth everyone’s time. This burden is higher the more people must listen to the question. For instance, at the briefing screen, the burden is nearly insurmountable. At the squad briefing, it is lower, but the burden is still on the private to make sure the question is relevant and timely. (Relevant= will help us accomplish the mission, timely = it should be asked now, and not later, in order to be useful.) When you are speaking only to your FTL or your fireteam, the burden is much lower.

      SPEED OFF THE BAT: Every soldier, FTL, Squad Lead, and Commander, must have in their mind that the goal is to get to combat quickly. As quickly as possible. When dysnc is clear, their goal should be to get ready to go, not in a leisurely way, but in a “good men are dying out there in battle and I need to get out there and help them NOW” way. This involves both speedy clicking in the box, and quick thinking. Even a private has to look at his gear, and that of other soldiers and think: “What should I carry for me? Should I help someone else carry their gear instead? Joe looks really heavy, let me take some of his SMAWs. What should I load into the vehicle, given everyone is loading stuff in, and space is not infinite? What should I load in given I do not have all day?”
      Just solid gold right there.

      Excellent.


      Comment


      • #4
        Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

        Any ideas are good ideas, the above is good. I have a few things to mention about the topic:

        Briefing in game is not always feasible. There are enough missions that are time sensitive that this would dictate we still brief at the briefing screen. I very much like the idea of the CO briefing the SLs, other leads about their roles in game. There is no better way to tell your team clearly than to have an individual convo with them and assign tasks/roles.

        In terms of changing ammo boxes or radio dispersion, i find problems with this point. Each mission will be played differently, with different kit and different numbers of people. While that CO25 is playable with 10 guys, sometimes the only weapons you get are the ones you spawn with. If by kit/slotting requirements that means someone didn't get a LR radio, why prevent them from doing so? I've seen the comms issues play out a great many times, trying to figure out how to get Air, Ground, Arty, Logistics, each Squad to talk to eachother is a challenge. Take away the flexibility of giving a key person a radio and its not a challenge, its impossible.

        My two cents of briefing and mission launch:

        - CO calls out slots, move to brief.
        - All players read notes.
        - Once all players have read notes (or they are read aloud by the CO) the CO begins creating his assualt plan.
        - At this time, general conversation can occur within reasonable limits. (My theory here: allows time for general server chatting. When else do we get to speak freely? In game a little, but we're a community that should be able to handle 5 minutes of stress relieving jokes or other.)
        - CO calls "Break Break, Command will now brief". Everyone shuts their faces :)
        - CO briefs.
        - Concluding brief, CO asks Leaders by unit if they have questions. After leadership is done, CO may allow squad members to ask any pertinent questions to the mission.
        - Brief ends, mission loads.
        - With ComSigs assigned, SLs can brief their squad and answer anyother questions while gearing up... or paradropping out of a C-130... whatever the situation happens to be. Have fun.
        Q: How many members of Congress does it take to change a light bulb?
        A: None. There is nothing wrong with the light bulb; its conditions are improving every day. Any reports of its lack of incandescence are delusional spin from the liberal media. That light bulb has served honorably, and anything you say undermines the lighting effort. Why do you hate freedom?!?

        Comment


        • #5
          Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

          I feel that time is best spent briefing ingame as everyone gears up and awaits further orders. Because no matter how thorough the briefing at the map screen was, it often still takes upwards of 10-15minutes to finalize the briefing and get all kitted out in game. So if we do the majority of the briefing in game, save time at the map screen, and allow players to get kitted while the briefing is ongoing, we save ourselves time.
          |TG-6th|CorpDuty

          Comment


          • #6
            Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

            I love the posts Garthra is coming out with. These are all great points, and I'd like to add that a good habit of getting into while at the briefing screen (and the slot selection screen, for that matter) is to only allow the commander / administrator to speak, and only allow other conversation to happen via chat. The person in charge, of course, can ask others questions and such... but the essential concept is "only speak when spoken too".

            This will still let people share post-op stories and have a few laughs without getting in the way of the mission essential brief or slotting.

            I've seen it done elsewhere, where 100+ people are all being briefed or slotted. It works flawlessly.

            Otherwise, I like all ideas above.

            I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones. -Albert Einstein

            Comment


            • #7
              Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

              Two big points, since this is not at all a new problem to TG. It's been this way since ArmA1. There's a reason every time I CO, I say, "This is what we're doing. I don't micromanage, so figure it out on the way." There is no problem that absolutely cannot be solved in-game and has to be done on the briefing screen.

              For the CO:
              Hurry up and make up your mind. Formulate your plan while everyone is reading the notes and be decisive. If everyone didn't read the notes and you're ready to move to game, tough luck. They'll get time later.

              For the Players:
              Just be quiet. Period. This doesn't mean you all can't BS around for a bit. It means if the CO wants input, he'll ask for it, and when he says it's time to shut up, do so immediately. That sounds like being a jerk, but it's not. As someone who has run raids in WoW with 40+ people and plenty more in other games with thrice that number, the key for fluidity is keeping your mouth shut.

              Also, like ThirdSin, I oppose the idea of forcing a mapmaker to have to handle a problem that is almost entirely exclusive to TG.

              TG's attitude, for the most part, is "I have to have the kit I want." I took a tactical carbine course just yesterday and used a particular rifle for more than half the day (AR15 platform with an collapsible stock, Aimpoint CCO, foregrip, and tactical light at the 3). Then, randomly, the instructors told us to shoot -- in order -- a bolt-action rifle, a Ruger Mini 14 model 7, an old-school lever-action 30-30, and an AK-47 in a timed event. Get outside your comfort zone, because you need to be a proficient SHOOTER, not a specialist with one gun.

              I'd love to see a mission where everyone has ironsights and no 343s, rucksacks, NV, or GPS, or anything fancy like that and let them learn to deal with it. If you're not comfortable with the least, you don't deserve to use the most.

              Comment


              • #8
                Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

                Briefings are important. I rarely feel like we spend too much time on the screen. (Garthra's post still looks like a good plan regardless.)

                On the other hand, I sometimes despair at playing with TG at all because of the frequency with which we spend the better part of an HOUR (no exaggerations here) starting at ammo crates. This happens even (or especially!) during small missions where outfitting should take minutes. Seriously, if the officers want to go all drill sergeant on people when they're getting ammo, a lot of us would probably bless them for it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

                  Long time, no see. I'll just chip in on this discussion as I find it interesting mostly from a mission maker's point of view.

                  First off, time spent at briefing is a reoccuring complaint I've heard many times before, but I am of the belief that a good briefing carries with it a good game. This goes both for the CO, but also for the mission maker. The better the OPORD supplied by the MM, the easier it is for the CO to actually give the briefing. I currently use an OPORD format by a guy called Beta which is an exact copy of a standard 5-point OPORD: Situation, mission, execution, support and command and signals. I fill out each underlying paragraph in each point because I want to give the mission a realistic feel and to provide as much information as possible within reason. If one has ever tried one of Beta's WAC missions you'll recognize the OPORD format.

                  I myself would consider 10-15 minutes of briefing time enough for most missions, but I don't mind using 20 minutes if the mission scale requires it. There is however time to spare already before the mission is launched. I myself never ever put down weapon crates for my missions. I make the gear script and the weapons provided there is the only weapons a player would find except of the body of a dead enemy. I may provide a ammunition crate or store it within a vehicle (I am quiet fond of MECHINF units), but it would take only a few seconds to realize that there is no other weapons. You have what you have and you'd better make those 7 magazines count, Jack. The whole serenade of the box humping is best solved by mission maker intent and sticking by it. No crate, no humping. I've made several kits on Soviet and post-Soviet units, but also on modern US and Danish Army forces. When I give a MAAWS to combat enemy armour I don't see the need to stick in a javelin in a box.

                  1. Avoids chatter at the briefing screen, where some comments are useful and pertinent to the mission, but many are not timely, even if they are useful.
                  After I've covered the five points in the OPORD I go about questions: PL - PSG - SL - FTLs of the squad - Squad members (If time permits). If time doesn't permit me to reach each player I trust my briefing has been thourough enough for other leaders to answer on the go. On the matter of timely comments it's a question of teaching players the procedure of the briefing screen and not changing the procedure because some people can't be quiet.

                  2. Creates a structure where squad leaders automatically have a moment to speak to their squad.
                  I have no memory of lacking a moment to answer questions or speak to my squad post-briefing and cannont reason for a structure to allow it.


                  3. Minimizes boredom while other players are discussing parts of the mission that are relevant to them, but not relevant to most of the force. (For instance, if I am a rifleman private in a ground convoy, why do I care what the flight path of the chopper borne troops will be? I don’t. Why do I care about the distribution of AT ammo in another squad? I don’t.)
                  Yes, you do! So you won't mistake the friendly helicopters for enemy and cause a blue-on-blue incident with your 12.7mm HMG or stinger missile for that sake. It's called situational awareness. So if the player doesn't shut down his attention because the briefing now covers the airborne element he will know in advance and won't have to ask a leader. I am given company level information during operations in Afghanistan as a section 2IC all the time and it's information that given to the rest of the section at the same time

                  4. Allows multiple briefings to go on at once. Multiple discussions between FTLs and privates about ammo distribution while the commander is briefing the squad leaders, and multiple squad briefings afterward.
                  Solved with proper gear scripts and multiple briefings afterwards the intial PL brief bears the best fruit if everyone has heard the full plan of the CO. You can't really expect a good outcome if you don't have one or the other.

                  5. Briefing is done in game, where players are not trapped idle, and can be gearing up or loading ammo into vehicles. This is superior to the briefing screen where every player is stuck sitting totally useless while one player’s question is answered. Using this method, only the player asking the question and the squad leader answering it are kept busy. Everyone else can be getting ready to move out.
                  Solved with proper gear scripts and/or setting slots as starting in vehicles. Also, I imagine many questions are repeats of each other but to different squad leaders. By using the method I employ a person in 3rd squad who started with 5 question could be down to 1 after 1st and 2nd squad has been through.

                  6. Questions are addressed to squad leaders, and not the commander. Often in our missions I see a barrage of questions directed at the commander at the start of the mission. Everything from “what is the chem light color?” to “what squad am I in?” The commander has other things to think about, and should not be burdened with such questions, that can be addressed to the FTL or squad leader.
                  Again the problem is people and not the briefing screen. If they don't know which squad they are in because they were not paying attention, then they should be paying attention and a simple "Ask your SL in-game" will suffice. If they don't know because they are new, be a good guy and answer it even if it's pvt. Pyle asking the Company Commander.

                  I don't believe the problem is time, but giving way to people complaining about the basic procedure Thirdsin described and not getting rid of the awful weapons crate. A good briefing is paramount to a tactical gaming experience.
                  I don't mean to come off as cross.
                  |
                  | |




                  "Kirov is boss"
                  CO49 Great Bear Part 1, 28APR2012.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

                    The issue round the ammo boxes is one of basic discipline and SL/FTL organisation. Whilst the restriction of kit is one way of combating such a problem its a sledgehammer to crack a nut and isn't necessary in every scenario/mission. It has it's place where the mission maker wants to have more direct control of how the scenario plays out and does alleviate any time spent choosing loadout. However it also removes choice and can dictate tactical decisions, this can be good, it can also be bad.

                    I for one enjoy having some latitude over the specific loadout I have and feel it is part of my game to ensure I select the appropriate weapons platform and equipment. I enjoy having to think about my role in the squad, making sure I choose cross compatible ammunition where appropriate, selecting appropriate optics for my assigned role/terrain/engagement distance. Guess what I rarely spend more than 60 seconds loading out, usually only exceeding that if the SL has to make squad adjustments etc. How, because I don't enjoy wasted time, I enjoy being organised and I realise time spent faffing about is time not spent on the objective. As soon I have heard the mission plan and my role in it, however small, I am working out a template for my loadout, factoring in flexibility etc. That way I am good to go as soon as I hit the crate, I am not window shopping I am collecting the gear I need to do my job.

                    Pre-determined loadouts are great in some circumstances, and can contribute to immersion and control. However I do occasionally tire of finding myself kitted with iron sights and 5 mags on a map like Takistan where I am expected to carry out tasks usually assigned to Long Range Recon Patrols with a 3 day load. Similarly if I consistently going to find myself in 400m+ engagements on open terrain I want to have to the tools to do the job.

                    As regards too many questions flying about in briefings and during the load out/load up phase, well again that's simply discipline. COC isn't just about the flow of orders down, it's about the compartmentalisation of information and the exchange of info back and forth, as many have stated. Simply put, if you have a basic question and its an appropriate moment, ask a squad mate. If you need to ask something important or mission specific, ask your FTL and so on.

                    Last but by no means least, whenever someone asks you something, be polite and be respectful.


                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

                      Here here




                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

                        Originally posted by LordFuzzywig View Post
                        I'd love to see a mission where everyone has ironsights and no 343s, rucksacks, NV, or GPS, or anything fancy like that and let them learn to deal with it. If you're not comfortable with the least, you don't deserve to use the most.
                        TG used to have quite a few of those back in the day, the most notorious of which were "Falcon Missions". Any time you saw his name in mission credits you were lucky if you had chem lights. Similarly, there was a super fun (although difficult) mission created by azzwort which involved a night para-drop from a C130 with no GPS or no NVGs. The first thirty minutes of the mission everybody had to regroup using visual landmarks in Chernarus while dodging enemy patrols that would shoot up flares when they discovered you.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

                          I would like to solicit the comments of my fellow TG players on these ideas, stolen as they are from Shack Tactical.
                          Classy of you to give credit like that. I suspected I knew what the contents of your post would be based on the topic, and I wasn't surprised by what I found. ;)

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

                            Player Discipline v. Changing the Structure

                            Many good points have been raised, and I am glad this is getting a thorough discussion. While I do not agree with all of them, it is good to have a variety of ideas and perspectives.

                            The Argument for Personal Responsibility:
                            Several of the comments seem to have a common theme, which I believe is, basically: “do not change the map or current procedure in order to alter player behavior, let the players adapt their behavior to the current maps and procedure.” It appears people are objecting to my suggestion because it changes the game to fit the reality of the problem we face, and does not place enough emphasis on personal responsibility and people changing their own behaviors. There is some real truth to this argument; however we structure our missions, however many boxes we place, or don't place, or what loadouts we give players, it will in the end come down to players behavior. So why not just cut to the chase and focus on that?


                            Examples
                            Examples of this theme, as I see it, appear below:

                            Originally posted by J.B. View Post
                            On the matter of timely comments it's a question of teaching players the procedure of the briefing screen and not changing the procedure because some people can't be quiet.
                            Again the problem is people and not the briefing screen. If they don't know which squad they are in because they were not paying attention, then they should be paying attention …
                            I don't believe the problem is time, but giving way to people complaining about the basic procedure ThirdSin described

                            Originally posted by Wicks View Post
                            The issue round the ammo boxes is one of basic discipline and SL/FTL organization
                            . . .
                            As regards too many questions flying about in briefings and during the load out/load up phase, well again that's simply discipline. .

                            Originally posted by LordFuzzywig View Post
                            Also, like ThirdSin, I oppose the idea of forcing a mapmaker to have to handle a problem that is almost entirely exclusive to TG.


                            My Response:

                            I believe this is a philosophical difference as to how to approach the problem. A agree that asking more of our players in terms of self-discipline is one solution and will, if properly executed, address these concerns.

                            I sought to raise another approach to increasing speed and decreasing extraneous comments besides simply expecting more of our players because self-discipline will not always be present in a group of people engaging in a leisure activity during their free time. (It is debatable to what extent it even ought to be.) My objective was to offer a potential alternative solution because, at least as far as I can see, 1.) personal restraint alone is not currently solving this, and 2.) does not require an admin or another person to bark at people and enforce discipline on the server - because their time is limited, 3.) does not alter the tone or come across as unwelcoming. The third point is very important because even if there is an enforcer present and willing to perform that role, the act of enforcing discipline could change the atmosphere in the server. The changes could be both desirable (quieter during briefings, things happen quicker on the server/during missions,), and undesirable ones (a less fun feel, new players see TG as a harsh and unwelcoming place, etc.).

                            Simply put; self-discipline will require, to some extent, external discipline from an enforcer. My plan was in part designed to minimize the need for such policing which has several costs:
                            1.) Time for the enforcer/admin
                            1.(b)) May make the enforcer’s/admin's night less fun as most people do not enjoy being the bad guy.
                            2.) Costs atmosphere generally and fun to majority of players; they must either listen to idle chatter or listen to a police officer busting some one. (Or one, and then the other, neither of which is good.)

                            Note: I recognize that my premises are debatable. For instance would a harsher, more disciplined, more military feel with an enforcer role be necessarily a bad thing? That is certainly an open question, and big enough to have its own forum post.

                            In conclusion:
                            We are unlikely to make headway or convince one another on this issue; both approaches will work, the question is which way you want to get there. One could reframe the disagreement more generally as personal responsibility vs. structural incentives to motivate behavior. As with everything in life, personal responsibility is certainly going to be part of it. The question is, how much of the load do we make it carry on TG? And how do we pick up the slack on the remainder? I would argue for a little less here, you would argue for a little more but really we are not so far apart.
                            The question foremost in my mind is "what will bring the most tactical fun to the server?"

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Briefing Blues and One Possible Solution

                              JB, can you elaborate as to what you use as a template for an OPORD?

                              Googling has given me a military related site, which offers an excruciatingly lengthy OPORD template, which is multiple pages long and completely overkill for PC gaming:

                              http://www.armystudyguide.com/conten...er-opord.shtml

                              I would like to use a more standardized template in my missions. Curious as to what you use.
                              "Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new."
                              -Einstein

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