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  • Saint Avold

    Hi all,

    I wanted to share some photos with you. I went to Saint Avold today in France. It is the largest cemetery for American WWII dead in Europe. Most died in the push from France into Germany in late '44 and early '45. Over 10,000 dead buried here.

    Very sad they mostly died at the very end of the conflict.

    http://www.abmc.gov/cemeteries/cemeteries/lo.php







    Medal of Honor recipients:























    Again, another moving place where our brothers in arms gave the ultimate sacrifice for democracy.

    T
    sigpic

  • #2
    Re: Saint Avold

    Nice T - thank you for sharing

    "You milsim guys are ruining the game."

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    • #3
      Re: Saint Avold

      Nice pics T. Now I know the cemetery you were talking about.
      sigpic

      OLD GUYS RULE!!!!

      Humor is something that thrives between man's aspirations and his limitations. There is more logic in humor than in anything else. Because, you see, humor is truth. Victor Borge


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      • #4
        Re: Saint Avold

        It's very scary to see that many grave sites. And to think that's just a fraction...
        Skud


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        • #5
          Re: Saint Avold

          Makes you think about war and the neccessity of it, doesn't it?
          sigpic

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          • #6
            Re: Saint Avold

            Thanks for sharing TMAN.




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            • #7
              Re: Saint Avold

              And sadly this is not to be the last worldwar in history. Thanks for sharing Tman.

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              • #8
                Re: Saint Avold

                Medal of Honor Citations for the two soldiers whose crosses are pictured here:

                MILLER, ANDREW

                Rank and organization: Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, Company G, 377th Infantry, 95th Infantry Division. Place and date: From Woippy, France, through Metz to Kerprich Hemmersdorf, Germany, 16-29 November 1944. Entered service at: Two Rivers, Wis. Birth: Manitowoc, Wis. G.O. No.: 74, 1 September 1945. Citation: For performing a series of heroic deeds from 16-29 November 1944, during his company's relentless drive from Woippy, France, through Metz to Kerprich Hemmersdorf, Germany. As he led a rifle squad on 16 November at Woippy, a crossfire from enemy machineguns pinned down his unit. Ordering his men to remain under cover, he went forward alone, entered a building housing 1 of the guns and forced 5 Germans to surrender at bayonet point. He then took the second gun single-handedly by hurling grenades into the enemy position, killing 2, wounding 3 more, and taking 2 additional prisoners. At the outskirts of Metz the next day, when his platoon, confused by heavy explosions and the withdrawal of friendly tanks, retired, he fearlessly remained behind armed with an automatic rifle and exchanged bursts with a German machinegun until he silenced the enemy weapon. His quick action in covering his comrades gave the platoon time to regroup and carry on the fight. On 19 November S/Sgt. Miller led an attack on large enemy barracks. Covered by his squad, he crawled to a barracks window, climbed in and captured 6 riflemen occupying the room. His men, and then the entire company, followed through the window, scoured the building, and took 75 prisoners. S/Sgt. Miller volunteered, with 3 comrades, to capture Gestapo officers who were preventing the surrender of German troops in another building. He ran a gauntlet of machinegun fire and was lifted through a window. Inside, he found himself covered by a machine pistol, but he persuaded the 4 Gestapo agents confronting him to surrender. Early the next morning, when strong hostile forces punished his company with heavy fire, S/Sgt. Miller assumed the task of destroying a well-placed machinegun. He was knocked down by a rifle grenade as he climbed an open stairway in a house, but pressed on with a bazooka to find an advantageous spot from which to launch his rocket. He discovered that he could fire only from the roof, a position where he would draw tremendous enemy fire. Facing the risk, he moved into the open, coolly took aim and scored a direct hit on the hostile emplacement, wreaking such havoc that the enemy troops became completely demoralized and began surrendering by the score. The following day, in Metz, he captured 12 more prisoners and silenced an enemy machinegun after volunteering for a hazardous mission in advance of his company's position. On 29 November, as Company G climbed a hill overlooking Kerprich Hemmersdorf, enemy fire pinned the unit to the ground. S/Sgt. Miller, on his own initiative, pressed ahead with his squad past the company's leading element to meet the surprise resistance. His men stood up and advanced deliberately, firing as they went. Inspired by S/Sgt. Miller's leadership, the platoon followed, and then another platoon arose and grimly closed with the Germans. The enemy action was smothered, but at the cost of S/Sgt. Miller's life. His tenacious devotion to the attack, his gallant choice to expose himself to enemy action rather than endanger his men, his limitless bravery, assured the success of Company G.


                MURPHY, FREDERICK C.

                Rank and organization: Private First Class, U.S. Army, Medical Detachment, 259th Infantry, 65th Infantry Division. Place and date: Siegfried Line at Saarlautern, Germany, 18 March 1945. Entered service at: Weymouth, Mass. Birth: Boston, Mass. G.O. No.: 21, 26 February 1946. Citation: An aid man, he was wounded in the right shoulder soon after his comrades had jumped off in a dawn attack 18 March 1945, against the Siegfried Line at Saarlautern, Germany. He refused to withdraw for treatment and continued forward, administering first aid under heavy machinegun, mortar, and artillery fire. When the company ran into a thickly sown antipersonnel minefield and began to suffer more and more casualties, he continued to disregard his own wound and unhesitatingly braved the danger of exploding mines, moving about through heavy fire and helping the injured until he stepped on a mine which severed one of his feet. In spite of his grievous wounds, he struggled on with his work, refusing to be evacuated and crawling from man to man administering to them while in great pain and bleeding profusely. He was killed by the blast of another mine which he had dragged himself across in an effort to reach still another casualty. With indomitable courage, and unquenchable spirit of self-sacrifice and supreme devotion to duty which made it possible for him to continue performing his tasks while barely able to move, Pfc. Murphy saved many of his fellow soldiers at the cost of his own life.

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                • #9
                  Re: Saint Avold

                  Just think of how many young soldiers from every country who never had a chance to have a proper grave, its kinda sad...


                  those soldiers who died in france were lucky, my grandfather lost a cousin in the atlantic, he never had a proper burial
                  sigpic




                  Any problem on Earth can be solved with the careful application of high explosives.

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                  • #10
                    Re: Saint Avold

                    I really doubt that the dead care one bit about their graves.
                    sigpic

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                    • #11
                      Re: Saint Avold

                      Graves are not for the dead.
                      "If you want to build a ship, don't drum up the people to gather wood, divide the work, and give orders. Instead, teach them to yearn for the vast and endless sea."
                      -Antoine De Saint-Exupery

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                      • #12
                        Re: Saint Avold

                        T, thanks for sharing.

                        Warlab, great post, truely awesome.

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